Drew Bott
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iGCSE History (Germany 1919 - 1945) Quiz on Weimar Politics 1924 - 29, created by Drew Bott on 28/10/2019.

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Drew Bott
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Weimar Politics 1924 - 29

Question 1 of 7

1

Who was the German politician most closely associated with the Wiemar Republic's 'revival'?

Select one of the following:

  • Paul von Hindenburg

  • Friedrich Ebert

  • Gustav Stresemann

Explanation

Question 2 of 7

1

What made Gustav Stresemann 'acceptable' to Germans at the time?

Select one of the following:

  • He was a communist

  • He was a moderate nationalist

  • He was a right wing extremist

Explanation

Question 3 of 7

1

What percentage of the vote did the Nazis achieve in 1928?

Select one of the following:

  • 2.6%

  • 26%

  • 36%

Explanation

Question 4 of 7

1

Which Party was Stresemann a member of?

Select one of the following:

  • The SPD (Social Democrats)

  • The NSDAP (National Socialists)

  • The DVP (German Peoples Party)

Explanation

Question 5 of 7

1

Which of the following happened in 1925 that 'indicated' the Republic was becoming more stable politically?

Select one or more of the following:

  • Paul von Hindenburg was elected President

  • Stresemann negotiated the Locarno Treaty

  • The SPD won a majority

  • Hitler polled 13 million votes in the Presidential election

Explanation

Question 6 of 7

1

How many chancellors and coalition governments were there between 1924 and 1929?

Select one of the following:

  • 4 Chancellors and all governments were majority Governments

  • 20 Chancellors and 16 Coalition Governments

  • 16 Chancellors and 20 coalition governments

Explanation

Question 7 of 7

1

What happened in the 1928 Presidential Election?

Select one or more of the following:

  • Hitler won 36% of the vote

  • Hindenburg won 56% of the vote

  • First time round Hindenburg failed to get a majority - so it had to be run again

  • Hindenburg's election was a positive sign for the republic - another victory for moderate nationalism

Explanation