PE - GCSE Glossary

rjapmann
Flashcards by , created about 4 years ago

PE Definitions

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rjapmann
Created by rjapmann about 4 years ago
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Question Answer
Aerobic "With Oxygen" If exercise is not too fast and is steady, the heart can supply all the oxygen muscles need.
########## Aesthetic Appreciation ########## To be able to see the beauty in a performance.
Agility The ability to change the position of the body quickly and to control the movement of the whole body.
Anabolic steroids Drugs that mimic the male sex hormone testosterone and promote bone and muscle growth.
Anaerobic "Without Oxygen". If exercise is done in short, fast bursts the heart cannot supply blood and oxygen to the muscles as fast as the cells use them.
Anorexic Pertaining to anorexia; a prolonged eating disorder due to loss of appetite.
Balance The ability to retain the body's centre of mass (gravity) above the base of support with reference to static (stationary), or dynamic (changing), conditions o f movement, shape and orientation.
Balanced Diet A diet which contains an optimal ration of nutrients.
Beta Blockers Drugs that are used to control heart rate and that have a calming and relaxing effect.
Blood Pressure Blood pressure (BP) is the force exerted by the heat as it pumps blood our of the heart and into the arteries (systolic high pressure) and it is low when it relaxes between beats (diastolic).
Body Compostion The percentage of body weight which is fat, muscle and bone.
Cardiac Output The amount of blood ejected from the heart in one minute.
Cardiovascular Fitness The ability to exercise the entire body for long periods of time.
Cholestrerol Cholesterol is a blood fat which the body needs in moderate amounts.
########## Circuit Training ########## A set of 6 to 10 exercises performed at stations in an organised pattern. Each exercise is performed for a specified number of repetitions or for a prescribed time before moving on the next exercise.
Competence The relationship between: skill, the selection and application of skills, tactics, strategies and compositional ideas; and the readiness of the body and mind to cope with the activity. It requires an understanding of how these combine to produce effective performances in different activities and contexts.
Cooper's Run Test The ability to use two or more body parts together.
Coordination The ability to use two or more body parts together.
Cross Training Using more than one training method.
Diuretics Drugs that elevate the rate of bodily urine excretion.
Ectomorph A somatotype, individuals with narrow shoulders and narrow hips, characterised by thinness.
Endomorph A somatotype, individuals with wide hips and narrow shoulders, characterised by fatness.
Erythropoietin (EPO) A type of peptide hormone that increases the red blood cell count.
########## Exercise ########## A form of physical activity done to maintain or improve health and / or physical fitness.
Fartlek Training This type of training allows an athlete to run at varying speeds, over unmeasured distances, on different, on different terrain. (Fartlek is Swedish for "Speed Play")
########## Fitness ########## The ability to meet the demands of the environment.
FITT Frequency, intensity, time, type ( used to increase the amount of work the body does, in order to achieve overload).
Flexibility The range of movement possible at a joint.
Health A state of complete mental, physical and social wellbeing, and not merely the absence of disease and infirmity.
Health-Related Exercise Exercise which is undertaken primarily to improve health and fitness for life.
Healthy, Active Lifestyle A lifestyle that contributes positively to physical, mental and social wellbeing, and that includes regular physical activity.
Heart Rate The number of times the heart beats each minute.
Hypokinetic Disease A disease related to too little activity. (Hypo means under or too little: kinetic means energy or activity)
Hypertrophy Scientific term for an increase in the size of muscle.
Individual Differences / Needs Matching training to the requirements of an individual
Isometric Contractions Muscles contraction which results in increased tension but the length does not alter, for example when pressing against a stationary object.
Joint A place where two or more bones meet.
Ligaments A tissue that joins bone to bone.
Mesomorph A somatotype, individuals with wide shoulders and narrow hips, characterised by muscularity.
Methods of Training Interval training, continuos training, circuit training, weight training, Farlek training, cross training.
Muscular Endurance The ability to use voluntary muscles many times without getting tired.
Muscle Groups Muscle may be arranged in groups according to location and / or function eg; muscles of the leg.
Muscular Strength The amount of force a muscle can exert against a resistance.
Narcotic Analgesics Drugs that can be used to reduce the feeling of pain.
Obese A term used to describe people who are very overweight.
Optimum Weight Best weight or desirable weight - the best weight a player performs at.
Overfat A way of saying you have more body fat than you should have.
Overweight Having weight in excess of normal (not harmful unless accompanied by overfatness).
Oxygen Debt The amount of oxygen consumed during recovery above that which would have ordinarily been consumed in the same time at rest (this result in a shortfall in the oxygen available).
Par-Q Physical activity readiness questionnaire.
PEP Personal exercise programme.
Peptide hormones Drugs that cause the production of hormones.
########## Performance ########## How well a task is completed.
PESSCL PE and School Sport Club Links
Physical Activity Any form of exercise or movement; physical activity may be planned an structured or unplanned and unstructured ( in PE we are concerned with planned and structured physical activity, such as a fitness class).
Power The ability to do strength performances quickly (power = strength X speed).
########## Progressive Overload ########## To gradually increase the amount of overload so that fitness gains occur, but without potential of injury.
Reaction Time The time between the presentations of a stimulus and the onset of a movement.
Recovery The time required for the repair of damage to the body caused by training or competition.
Rehabilitation Restoring ( an injury ) to its normal functioning state.
Resistance Training Training that uses a resistance or force against which specific muscle groups must work eg: weight training.
Reversibility Any adaption that takes place as a consequence of training will be reversed when you stop training.
RICE Rest. Ice. Compression. Elevate. ( a method of treating injuries).
Role Models A person you can aspire to, to make you in to a better person. Often have qualities that we would like to have.
Self-Esteem Respect for, or a favourable opinion, of oneself.
Skill-Related Fitness Exercise which may be undertaken primarily to improve sporting ability.
SMART Specific. Measurable. Achievable. Realistic. Time-bound.
Socio-Economic Status May be based on a person's income, education, and occupation.
Somatotypes Classification of body type.
########## Specificity ########## Matching training to the requirements of an activity.
Speed The differential rate at which an individual is able to perform a movement or cover a distance in a period of time.
Stimulants Drugs that have an effort on the central nervous system, such as increased mental and / or physical alertness.
Stroke Volume The volume of blood pumped out of the heart by each ventricle during one contraction.
Target Zone The range within which an individual needs to work for aerobic training to take place (60-80 per cent of maximum heart rate).
Tendons A tissue that joins muscles to bone.
Training A well-planned programme which uses scientific principles to improve performance,skill, game ability and motor and physical fitness.
Training Thresholds The boundaries of the target zone.
Underweight Weighing less than is normal, healthy or required.
######## 3 reasons for taking part in physical activity 1. Physical - (improving health and fitness) 2. Mental / Psychological - ( reducing stress and relieving related problems) 3. Social - (making and developing friendships and building teamwork skill)
########## 7 benefits of taking part in physical activity flash card #1 1. To Increase Fitness. 2. To Help the Individual Feel Good. 3. To Relieve Stress and Tension.
########## 7 benefits of taking part in physical activity flash card #2 4. To Increase Self-Esteem and Confidence. 5. To Improve Health. 6. For Enjoyment. 7. For a Mental Challenge.
######### 6 Key Influences on Taking Part flash card #1 1. People - Family, Peers, Role Models. 2. Image - Fashion, Media Coverage. 3. Cultural Factors - Age, Disability, Gender, Race.
########## 6 Key Influences on Taking Part flash card #2 4. Resources - Availability, Location, Access, Time. 5. Health & Wellbeing - Illness, Health Problems 6. Socio - economic Factors - Cost, Perceived Status of the Activity.
########## 4 Parts of the Participation Pyramid (1.Foundation / 2. Participation / 3. Performance / 4. Elite) 1. P.E & Recreational Sports. 2. Sports Clubs & Leisure Centres. 3. Local & Regional Coaching & Training / Entering Competitions. 4. Olympic, Paralympic & Commonwealth Games.
######### 5 Components of Health Related Fitness flash card #1 1. Cardiovascular Fitness 2. Muscular Strength 3. Muscular Endurance 4. Flexibility 5. Body Composition
######### 6 Components of Skill Related Fitness 1. Agility 2. Balance 3.Coordination 4.Power 5.Reaction Time 6. Speed
########## 5 Principles of Training 1. Individual Needs / Difference 2. Moderation 3. Specificity 4. Progressive Overload 5. Rest and Recovery
########## 4 parts of the FITT principle 1. F - Frequency 2. I - Intensity 3. T - Time 4. T - Type
########### 5 Components of a SMART Target 1. S - Specific 2. M - Measurable 3. A - Achievable 4. R - Realistic 5. T - Time-Bound
########### 6 Methods of Training 1. Interval 2. Continuous 3. Fartlek 4. Circuit 5. Weight 6. Cross
########## 2 Training Zones 1. Aerobic Zone 2. Anaerobic Zone
########## 7 Factors of a Balanced Diet 1. Carbohydrates 2. Fats 3. Protein 4. Minerals 5. Vitamins 6. Water 7. Fibre
########## Describe how you used the principles of training in your Personal Exercise Plan. flash card #1 My PEP was to help me to improve my fitness for football. I did Farklek to increase my cardiovascular fitness, Farklek training includes sprints over different terrain, and I included hills as well - good training for a football game
########## Describe how you used the principles of training in your Personal Exercise Plan. flash card #2 I also did Circuit Training because it will improve my local muscular endurance, cardiovascular fitness and circulo-respiratory fitness and Circuit Training develops fitness as well.
########## Discuss the most appropriate training methods for a rugby player flash card #1 The best training methods for a rugby player are sprints and intervals on the field which will tax their anaerobic system. Cardio equipment can also be very useful. Due to the constant demands on their legs while playing rugby, the joints will need time to unload.
########## Discuss the most appropriate training methods for a rugby player flash card #2 To continue to work on their cardiovascular system, they should use cardiovascular equipment to supplement some of their conditioning. When using cardio equipment, l they should use equipment with low impact, like an elliptical or bike....
########## Discuss the most appropriate training methods for a rugby player flash card #3 so that they can work the cardiovascular system without stressing the legs. Cardio equipment may also be used to help tap into the high-intensity anaerobic systems. Due to the fact that you can control the workload (speed, incline, watts, level etc.)
Explain the most important component of fitness for a 400m runner. flash card #1 Fitness training for 400m runners is all about getting your body in the right condition to be able to do the hard track speed training.
Explain the most important component of fitness for a 400m runner. flash card #2 The fitness needed can be attained in a number of ways, but the link is that they are all type of aerobic work, working on the cardio-vascular system and, hopefully, also low intensity work on the muscles needed in your event.
Explain the most important component of fitness for a 400m runner. flash card #3 Circuit Training is important - It is important to consider the muscles used for running so, half squats, calf raises and burpees are all important. However, the core (stomach and back) is also vital as are some upper body exercises for driving your arms.