K218

brechenser567
Flashcards by brechenser567, updated more than 1 year ago
brechenser567
Created by brechenser567 almost 6 years ago
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Block 1 Perspectives on the lives of children and young people Learning guides 1–7 Block 1 begins by introducing you to different elements of K218, and the main focus is on exploring the module themes. These themes are some of the theories and perspectives which underpin K218 – they also highlight the way in which the module advocates that we work with children, young people and their families. The early learning guides go on to look at some fundamental issues for work with children, young people and families including the meaning of ‘childhood’, children’s wellbeing, diversity and inequalities, and values and reflection in practice. Block 2 Critical practice Learning guides 8–14 Block 2 focuses on practice and analyses its key elements. The material will help support effective assessment, planning and engagement. Different ways of researching, reviewing and reflecting on practice are considered. You also have an opportunity to investigate the development of new models of working from the UK and Europe, particularly social pedagogy. You will study key principles and influences on services and practices, such as integrated working, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, and the safeguarding and resilience of children and young people. The focus is on the development, direction, resourcing and actions of universal and specialist services but you will also be able to examine law and social policy specific to your own area of interest.
Block 3 Working with children and young people, families and communities Learning guides 15–20 Block 3 opens with a look at social and cultural movement and change. It goes on to consider a wide range of spaces, or contexts, where the lives of children, young people and families are lived. You investigate the meanings that children and young people, and their carers/parents attribute to the spaces in which they live. This includes community and family spaces, as well as alternative and transitional spaces. At the end of the module you are encouraged to reflect on your learning and consider your next steps as a learner and/or practitioner. Learning outcomes • 1.1 the development of services for children, young people and families within a spatial (UK) and historic context • 1.2 the theories, concepts, ideologies and policies shaping childhood and challenging practice with children, young people and families • 1.3 the political, legal, ethical and rights frameworks guiding practice with children, young people and families across the UK and beyond • 1.4 contemporary research related to children, young people and families and its application to practice • 1.5 the interrelationship of the values of practitioners, service providers, children, young people, families and self with practice • 1.6 diversity among children, young people and families, and how this interrelates with issues of power, inequality, an
Cognitive skills • 2.1 analyse issues, form questions and demonstrate awareness of problems from a range of perspectives • 2.2 evaluate the appropriateness and effectiveness of different practice approaches involving practitioners, children, young people and families • 2.3 apply concepts and theories to interpret, critically evaluate and develop practice with children, young people and families • 2.4 critically select and apply knowledge from experience, research and other sources to develop understanding of issues, to sustain reasoned arguments and to identify and problematise practices involving children, young people and families. Key skills After studying this module, you should be able to: • 3.1 communicate effectively for the intended audience and purpose, and in an appropriate style and level using different media • 3.2 read, select and manipulate information from a range of resources, including electronic sources • 3.3 identify, understand and compare different lines of reasoning, recognising authority of source, possible bias, opinion and perspective • 3.4 write assignments, using an appropriate style and structure to present a logical and coherent argument • 3.5 use ICT tools and numerical skills to organise learning, present written work and gather information for assessment • 3.6 manage own learning through the identification of: learning needs; objective setting; monitoring progress through critical reflection; identifying strengths and weaknesses; and responding to feedback.
Practical and professional skills After studying this module, you should be able to: • 4.1 observe, describe and record accurately and assess evidence and make informed decisions • 4.2 critically evaluate approaches to service provision and use strategies for safe and effective practice • 4.3 practise critical reflection • 4.4 examine and reflect on effective practice with a range of service users and in a variety of settings • 4.5 analyse the factors and processes that facilitate effective interdisciplinary, inter-professional and interagency collaboration and partnership • 4.6 demonstrate sensitivity in relation to the diversity of values and interests of others. Themes K218 has the following themes: 1. Knowledge, skills, values and technologies for collaborative practice. 2. Diversity, inequalities and rights. 3. The spaces and places where children, young people and families live, learn and spend time together. 4. The relationships between children, young people, families, community and society. 5. A critical understanding of policy, practices and services.
1. Relationships between children, young people, families, community and society The module will promote the idea of looking at children and young people not in isolation or even just in the context of their immediate families, but through a careful consideration of the impact of a broad range of factors in their environment, their community and wider society. This ‘web of relationships’can be represented by using a social-ecological model to understand not only their lives but where and how services or policies might intervene to make a difference to them. 2. A critical understanding of policy, practice and services The module will help you critically understand policies (including legislation, guidelines and frameworks), services, for example, organisations that provide education, healthcare, childcare and parenting support) and practices (such as communication and relationship skills, ways of upholding rights and the assessment of children's needs) affecting children and young peoples lives. This critical understanding will involve investigating the strengths, weaknesses of policies, services and practices and a number of alternatives. You will for example study 'social pedagogy' an emerging practice approach more commonly found in Northern Europe. To support critical understanding the module will also introduce specific academiccritical thinking tools such as ‘social constructionism’ that can enable you to question assumptions we make about how things are including; is the ‘current’ or ‘normal’ way of viewing the lives of children, young people and families the right approach?
3. Knowledges, skills, values and technologies for collaborative practice The module will emphasise that practice is composed of three inextricably linked components – knowledge, skills and values. Exploring these is a crucial part of identifying good practice in work with children, young people and families. It is important that we keep coming back to consider these components but also to question ‘whose knowledge?’, ‘why those skills?’ and ‘which values?’. Technology involves the development and application of tools, techniques and systems to solve problems and perform tasks. Knowledge and skills are closely related to the use of technology. Here we specifically think about technologies that bring people together and produce policies, services and practices that can ultimately improve the lives of children and young people. Finally, the idea that this practice should be a ‘collaborative’ activity will be central to the module – shaping services with those who use them rather than on their behalf. 4. Spaces and places where children, young people and families live, learn and spend time together The module will consider the wide range of spaces or contexts where the lives of children, young people and families are affected by socio-economic factors and social policy. You will be encouraged to investigate the different meanings that children and young people and their carers/parents attribute to a whole range of different spaces – not just physical, but also social and discursive.
5. Diversity, inequality, and rights Families will have very different experiences of life. Their current experiences are influenced by a range of factors some involving the past, some related to who they are or where they live and others linked to the availability and accessibility of fundamental resources and rights. Consequently some children, for example those who are disabled, will encounter different issues in their lives from those who are not disabled. In fact, some children and young people and families will experience multiple inequalities and disadvantages. The module will aim to enhance understanding of the realities of inequality and diversity and their implications for practice. Services for children have also been increasingly influenced, and challenged, by an acknowledgement of children’s rights. The place of rights will be explored throughout the module. Bronfenbrenner's original social ecological model 1979. Child at the centre interacting first with its primary care givers , second ( direct) schools (indirect) parents workplace, 3 rd. neighbourhood, and social contacts and finally with cultural beliefs, expectations and values at the societal level.
Social construction Key aspects argue that knowledge is produced through discourse ( through language and social practices) It allows us to deconstruct taken for granted social norms . Questions of power relations ( asking questions such as who's interests are being met ????? Neither static not uncontested Takes the idea that the world is socially constructed by many different stakeholders such as children and young people, families, practitioners and also in everyday media and policy agendas Using both theories together In its broadest sense co-construction is a process of which involves a shared version of reality or practice between various different people. by using both social contructionsm and a social ecological model it provides a way of organising competing theoretical explanations and allows the possibility to broaden the scope beyond pre-determined behavioural goals and consider subjective realities. such as the different levels of influence, adversity, trauma and threat alongside changes in society and what is considered socially normal or what requires de construction
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