(6)The legislative process

Marcus  Danvers
Mind Map by Marcus Danvers, updated more than 1 year ago
Marcus  Danvers
Created by Marcus Danvers over 6 years ago
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A level Governing the UK - 2C ( Parliament) Mind Map on (6)The legislative process, created by Marcus Danvers on 11/13/2013.
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(6)The legislative process
1 Bills emerge from
1.1 An election manifesto promise
1.2 A government department after an election has been won
1.3 The influence of pressure groups
1.4 The influence of experts within their field
2 The White Paper
2.1 Sets out details of a future policy on a particular subject
2.2 Basis for a Bill to be put before Parliament
2.3 Allows for opportunity for government to gather feedback before it is FORMALLY presented
3 The Green Paper
3.1 Consultation document produced by the government
3.2 When considering a new law, this acts as a discussion document
3.3 Allows those within and outside of Parliament to contribute to discussion and provide feedback
4 A Public Bill
4.1 Public Bills change the law as it applies to the general population (e.g. change to national speed limit) and are the most common type of Bill introduced in Parliament. Government ministers propose the majority of Public Bills.
4.2 Introduced by either House of Commons or Lords
4.3 They are largely financial, or involve the public's money - like new taxes or public spending - are always introduced in the Commons.
5 A Private Bill
5.1 Usually promoted by organisations, like local authorities or private companies, to give themselves powers beyond, or in conflict with, the general law.
5.2 Private Bills only change the law as it applies to specific individuals or organisations, rather than the general public.
5.3 Bills can start in either House. The formal stages of Private Bills are broadly the same as Public Bills.
5.4 Parliament requires that Private Bills are publicised through newspaper adverts, official gazettes of local areas, and in writing to all interested parties. People directly affected by a Private Bill - for example, residents near a proposed site for a new cemetery - should also be informed.
5.5 Any group or individual directly affected by a Bill's proposals can object to it through petitions, examined and considered by committees of MPs and of Lords.
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