(10) What is Parliamentary Government

Marcus  Danvers
Mind Map by , created almost 6 years ago

A level Governing the UK - 2C ( Parliament) Mind Map on (10) What is Parliamentary Government, created by Marcus Danvers on 11/27/2013.

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Marcus  Danvers
Created by Marcus Danvers almost 6 years ago
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(10) What is Parliamentary Government
1 A parliamentary system of government is one which government governs in and through Parliament.
2 Criticism of the parliamentary system
2.1 The majority of MPs in the House of Commons came to see their role not as criticizing the government but as defenting government
2.2 This is why parliamentary government is often associated with problems of executive dominance
3 Parliamentary Government in the UK
3.1 Parliamentary elections based on the strength of party representation at Commons
3.2 Personnel of government drawn from Parliament (leaders of the largest party in the Commons)
3.3 Government is RESPONSIBLE to Parliament – rests on the confidence of the Commons and can be removed by defeat of ‘vote of no confidence’
3.4 Government can ‘dissolve’ Parliament – electoral terms are flexible within a 5 year limit (now restricted by fixed-term Parliaments)
3.5 Government based on collective ‘face’ – no Presidency, based on principle of cabinet government
3.6 The Prime Minister, as a Parliamentary ‘officer’, is head of government but NOT the head of state (very much separate).
4 Parliamentary Government, separation of powers comparison
4.1 parliamentary Governement
4.1.1 [Parliament] -} Personnel -} [Government] {- Responsibility
4.2 separation of powers
4.2.1 [Executive] {-} [Judiciary] {-} [Legislature] {-}
4.2.1.1 Checks and Balances
5 Theories of parliamentary power
5.1 The Westminster model
5.1.1 This is the classic view of parliament as the lynch pin of the UK system of government. It implies that parliament deliver both representative government and responsible government. In this view, parliament has significant policy influence
5.1.2 Parliament = representative government + responsible government Parliament = significant policy influence
5.2 The white hall Model
5.2.1 This model suggest that political and constitutional power has shifted firmly from parliament to the executive. Parliament is executively - dominated, and acts as little more than a 'rubber stamp' for government policy
5.2.2 Executive = political + constitutional power Parliament = rubber stamp (no meaningful policy influence)
5.3 The transformative model
5.3.1 It accept that parliament is no longer a policy-making body, but neither is its simple irrelevant. In the current view, parliament a transform policy but only by reacting to executive initiative
5.3.2 Parliament = no longer policy making body Parliament ≠ irrelevant
5.3.3 Parliament = transform policy (reacting to executive initiatives)

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