Untitled_6

shania catania
Note by , created over 6 years ago

form 3 english Note on Untitled_6, created by shania catania on 05/23/2013.

1995
0
0
Tags
shania catania
Created by shania catania over 6 years ago
Frankenstein Critic Quotes
Chloe Day
Using GoConqr to study English literature
Sarah Egan
Using GoConqr to teach English literature
Sarah Egan
AQA GCSE Physics Unit 2.1
Matthew T
Philosophy & Ethics G581 Key Philosophers (OCR)
A K
To Kill A Mockingbird GCSE English
naomisargent
How does Shakespeare present villainy in Macbeth?
maxine.canvin
English Literature Key Terms
charlotteoom
A View from the Bridge Quotes
Emma Payne
Gatsby notes on symbolism and themes
Maria-Rodriguez

Page 1

5 There vs Their vs They're Common Mistakes - English Grammar A common mistake not only for students learning English but also for native speakers is the difference between There, Their and They're in written English. This happens because both words sound the same when they are spoken. Words that sound the same but have different meanings (and sometimes spelling) are called homophones. Therefore they're, their and there are Homophones. Which words would make the following sentence correct? They’re/Their/There playing they’re/their/there video games over they’re/their/there. The answer appears at the end of the post so let’s learn the rules meanwhile. What is the difference between There, Their and They're? THERE There is the opposite of Here. It means “in that place” not here. A: Where is my book? – B: It’s over there. I will look for a hotel to stay when I arrive there. There is/There are = to show that something exists. There is a book on the table There are many countries in Europe. THEIR Their is a possessive adjective which is used before a noun. It shows possession, that something belongs to them. Their house is big. All of their friends were crazy. The children put their books in their school bags. THEY’RE They’re is a contraction of they are. e.g. They’re happy = They are happy They’re is usually before an adjective or a verb ending in ING. They’re very interested in the project. I personally think they’re crazy! They’re singing loudly. Example sentence... So now you know the difference let’s try the original question: They’re/Their/There playing they’re/their/there video games over they’re/their/there. The answer is: They’re playing their video games over there. Why? They’re playing (they’re is used before a verb ending in -ing making it the progressive tense) Their video games (their is a possessive used before a noun to show possession) Over there (there because it means not here, in that place) Here is a chart we have created to show you more about the difference: Try are interactive game to practice the difference between There, Their and They're.

5 There vs Their vs They're Common Mistakes - English Grammar A common mistake not only for students learning English but also for native speakers is the difference between There, Their and They're in written English. This happens because both words sound the same when they are spoken. Words that sound the same but have different meanings (and sometimes spelling) are called homophones. Therefore they're, their and there are Homophones. Which words would make the following sentence correct? They’re/Their/There playing they’re/their/there video games over they’re/their/there. The answer appears at the end of the post so let’s learn the rules meanwhile. What is the difference between There, Their and They're? THERE There is the opposite of Here. It means “in that place” not here. A: Where is my book? – B: It’s over there. I will look for a hotel to stay when I arrive there. There is/There are = to show that something exists. There is a book on the table There are many countries in Europe. THEIR Their is a possessive adjective which is used before a noun. It shows possession, that something belongs to them. Their house is big. All of their friends were crazy. The children put their books in their school bags. THEY’RE They’re is a contraction of they are. e.g. They’re happy = They are happy They’re is usually before an adjective or a verb ending in ING. They’re very interested in the project. I personally think they’re crazy! They’re singing loudly. Example sentence... So now you know the difference let’s try the original question: They’re/Their/There playing they’re/their/there video games over they’re/their/there. The answer is: They’re playing their video games over there. Why? They’re playing (they’re is used before a verb ending in -ing making it the progressive tense) Their video games (their is a possessive used before a noun to show possession) Over there (there because it means not here, in that place) Here is a chart we have created to show you more about the difference:

62 This - That - These -Those English Grammar Notes - Demonstrative Pronouns Singular Plural Here This These There That Those These words are called demonstrative pronouns and they are used to show the relative distance between the speaker and the noun. We use this (singular) and these (plural) to refer to something that is here / near. Examples: This is my car. (singular) These are our children. (plural) We use that (singular) and those (plural) to refer to something that is there / far. Examples: That is our house. (singular) Those are my shoes. (plural) Note that the verb changes (i.e. singular / plural) depending on the pronoun that you use. You can also use demonstrative pronouns with a noun. Examples: This party is boring. (singular) That city is busy. (singular) These chocolates are delicious. (plural) Those flowers are beautiful. (plural) If an action is near in time we tend to use this / these. If an action has finished or is in the past we use that / those. Examples: This is a good meal. (at the time of eating) Those girls we met last night were silly. (an event that happened in the past). The expressions this is / that is are also common when you talk on the phone or you introduce people. Examples: "Hello, this is Peter." Carol, this is my friend Simon. Simon, this is Carol.

62 This - That - These -Those English Grammar Notes - Demonstrative Pronouns Singular Plural Here This These There That Those These words are called demonstrative pronouns and they are used to show the relative distance between the speaker and the noun. We use this (singular) and these (plural) to refer to something that is here / near. Examples: This is my car. (singular) These are our children. (plural) We use that (singular) and those (plural) to refer to something that is there / far. Examples: That is our house. (singular) Those are my shoes. (plural) Note that the verb changes (i.e. singular / plural) depending on the pronoun that you use. You can also use demonstrative pronouns with a noun. Examples: This party is boring. (singular) That city is busy. (singular) These chocolates are delicious. (plural) Those flowers are beautiful. (plural) If an action is near in time we tend to use this / these. If an action has finished or is in the past we use that / those. Examples: This is a good meal. (at the time of eating) Those girls we met last night were silly. (an event that happened in the past). The expressions this is / that is are also common when you talk on the phone or you introduce people. Examples: "Hello, this is Peter." Carol, this is my friend Simon. Simon, this is Carol.

New Page

New Page

New Page

New Page