Deontology Edexcel A Level

Question 1 of 17

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What is the nature of deontology?

Select one of the following:

  • consequentialist, subjective, teleological, intrinsic value on consequences

  • objective, absolutist, intrinsic value on actions

Question 2 of 17

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Tick the different types of deontology.

Select one or more of the following:

  • monistic (e.g. Kant)

  • pluralistic (e.g. W.D. Ross)

  • Divine Command Law (e.g. Decalogue)

  • contractualism (e.g. rules in school)

  • duty (e.g. obligations)

Question 3 of 17

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Deontological constraints are rules or laws that make sure we refrain from doing wrong actions.

Select one of the following:

  • True
  • False

Question 4 of 17

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What does Kant believe about reason and the moral law?

Select one or more of the following:

  • There is an objective moral law that exists in the universe. "Moral rules exist and they are binding" (Bowie's Ethical Studies). We use reason to work out the moral law. Reason is so important that Kant refers to it as the "sovereignty of reason".

  • Kant takes an a priori approach because we use reason to work out the moral law logically and no experience is needed. It is also synthetic because Kant believes that even though we don't use experience, the conclusion is not contained within the premises.

  • Kant takes an a priori approach because we use reason to work out the moral law logically and no experience is needed. It is also analytic because Kant believes that even though we don't use experience, the conclusion is contained within the premises.

  • There is an objective moral law that exists in nature.

Question 5 of 17

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How is Kant different from Hume?

Select one or more of the following:

  • Kant focuses on practical reason whereas Hume focuses on sentiments.

  • Kant is a rationalist and Hume is an empiricist.

  • Kant is an empiricist and Hume is a rationalist.

  • Kant focuses on theoretical reason.

Question 6 of 17

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Kant believes that God leads to morality.

Select one of the following:

  • True
  • False

Question 7 of 17

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What does Kant believe about good will and duty?

Select one or more of the following:

  • For Kant, good will is when we use our will in a moral way. Good will is our motive and will always lead to moral acts since good will is unquestionably good and has intrinsic value.

  • Good will is not the only motive we can use. For example we could use the virtue of courage to motivate us to act morally.

  • According to Kant, we also need duty in order to avoid prudent self-interest. Therefore, we must do duty for duty's sake and not for any other reason.

  • Kant believes we should use natural inclination to help us act morally since it revolves around feelings.

  • Kant believes that all acts are good because of the right motives of good will and duty, which are dispassionate and universal.

Question 8 of 17

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Nagel says we are bound to duty when we make promises.

Select one of the following:

  • True
  • False

Question 9 of 17

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What is the difference between the hypothetical imperative and the categorical imperative?

Select one of the following:

  • The hypothetical imperative is conditional and involves consequences. Whereas the categorical imperative is unconditional and based on self less duty without feeling.

  • The hypothetical imperative uses hypothetical reason whilst the categorical imperative uses categorical reason.

  • We are morally bound by the hypothetical imperative whereas the categorical imperative is optional.

Question 10 of 17

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Tick the three formulations of the categorical imperative.

Select one or more of the following:

  • the law of nature / universalisability

  • formula of end in itself

  • formula of the kingdom of ends

Question 11 of 17

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According to Kant, there are four types of duty. Perfect duties are inflexible and there are no exceptions. Imperfect duties are more flexible and offer some choice as to how to fulfil them.
1. Perfect duty to ourselves: We have a duty to preserve our life and not commit suicide.
2. Perfect duty to others: We have a duty to not make false promises to others and treat people meaningfully.
3. Imperfect duty to ourselves: We have a duty to develop our talents but we can decide which ones to develop and to what degree.
4. Imperfect duty to others: We have a duty to help others, such as giving to charity, but we can decide how much we help.

Select one of the following:

  • True
  • False

Question 12 of 17

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What is the summum bonum?

Select one of the following:

  • the supreme or highest good / "virtue crowned with happiness" (Bowie's Ethical Studies) / God-given gift after we die / immortality of the soul

  • eudaimonia once we reach heaven

  • the punishment we receive if we don't follow our duty

Question 13 of 17

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Tick FOUR strengths of Kant's Deontology.

Select one or more of the following:

  • Everyone is equal because the categorical imperative focuses on having universal and fair moral commands that treat people with value.

  • Kant's Deontology is accessible to everyone because it uses reason.

  • Kant is cold and inhumane, making moral decision making simpler.

  • We are not dictated by God since morality leads to God. This perhaps promotes a more positive relationship with God, who rewards and praises us in the after-life rather than ordering us around.

  • By not focusing on feelings and emotions, we remain rational and are in control when making moral decisions.

  • Kant's Deontology doesn't consider the circumstances around the moral action.

Question 14 of 17

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W.D. Ross is an example of pluralistic deontology because there are 7 prima facie duties. Ross allows some flexibility in deontology because we can decide which of the 7 prima facie duties to use in certain situations, using our intuition. We don't just rely on one duty like Kant.

Select one of the following:

  • True
  • False

Question 15 of 17

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Tick FOUR weaknesses of Kant's Deontology.

Select one or more of the following:

  • Although Kant says we are autonomous moral agents, we are only free as long as we obey the the rules of the categorical imperative. This seems quite restrictive.

  • MacIntyre: We can use the universalisability principle in the categorical imperative to justify anything we want. This could lead to absurd rules and confusion.

  • Barclay: We need clear rules in order to avoid chaotic anarchy in society.

  • Nagel and Williams: Kant ignores the circumstances surrounding a moral action. We might think we are doing the morally right thing by following our duty but we may be causing harm. It isn't clear.

  • Kant's theory isn't well suited to the real world where complex decisions need to be made. Kant's Deontology is just too restrictive to be accessible to many in the modern world.

Question 16 of 17

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Tick FOUR weaknesses of Kant's Deontology.

Select one or more of the following:

  • Although Kant says we are autonomous moral agents, we are only free as long as we obey the the rules of the categorical imperative. This seems quite restrictive.

  • MacIntyre: We can use the universalisability principle in the categorical imperative to justify anything we want. This could lead to absurd rules and confusion.

  • Barclay: We need clear rules in order to avoid chaotic anarchy in society.

  • Nagel and Williams: Kant ignores the circumstances surrounding a moral action. We might think we are doing the morally right thing by following our duty but we may be causing harm. It isn't clear.

  • Kant's theory isn't well suited to the real world where complex decisions need to be made. Kant's Deontology is just too restrictive to be accessible to many in the modern world.

Question 17 of 17

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Hume would argue that Kant commits the is-ought gap. This can be seen as an AO2 weakness but here is the nuance (the subtlety): You could argue that Kant avoids the is-ought gap. Kant clearly makes an 'ought' statement but he doesn't actually make an 'is' statement. Instead, Kant uses rationality and suggests that an 'ought' implies a 'can'. Kant avoids the descriptive 'is' statements and argues that if we ought to carry out an action than we CAN and are morally obliged too.

Select one of the following:

  • True
  • False
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Deontology Edexcel A Level

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Quiz by , created over 1 year ago

Revision quiz for the Deontology topic of Unit 3 Ethics (A2 Religious Studies Developments Edexcel)

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Created by fstok over 1 year ago
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