English Quiz

Question 1 of 24

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Allusion is defined as:

Select one of the following:

  • two lines working as a unit

  • a brief reference to a person, event or place.

  • a form of word play between similar sounding words

  • words that imvolve one of the five senses

Question 2 of 24

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In which of the following examples did the author use allusion?

Select one of the following:

  • The moon smiled down on the sleepy town.

  • Her smile was like the Mona Lisa's.

  • Her smile lit up the whole room like rays of sunshine.

  • The book babbled to the deer as they took a drink.

Question 3 of 24

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What does a Boolean search do?

Select one of the following:

  • Allows you to specify the relationships between keywords and phrases on the internet

  • Allows you to specify a more general search on the internet

  • Allows you to skip all commercial (shopping sites)

  • It's a special kind of search engine

Question 4 of 24

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Choose all the correct answers: Which of the following are Boolean search terms?

Select one or more of the following:

  • So

  • Yet

  • Nor

  • Not

  • And

  • But

  • Or

Question 5 of 24

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Choose all the correct answers. When evaluating a website ask yourself the following questions:

Select one or more of the following:

  • Is the information biased?

  • Is the information commercial?

  • How reliable is the information?

  • When was the site created?

  • Who created the site?

  • What is the purpose of the site?

Question 6 of 24

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When writing and email to someone for information, your email should be all of the following?

Select one or more of the following:

  • Include a date

  • Polite and specific

  • Including a statement of intent

  • Should have the experts address

  • Include contact Information

  • Should be graciousness for the experts time

  • Provide interview questions in an attachment or as a google doc link

  • Should have formal style and tone

  • Should use specialized vocabulary and literary devices

Question 7 of 24

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An introductory paragraph for an informational paper includes all of the following:

Select one or more of the following:

  • Attention Grabber

  • Figurative Language

  • Odd statements

  • Background Information

  • Thesis Statement

  • Statistics

  • Formal Style and Objective Tone

Question 8 of 24

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Choose all of the following which are good attention grabbers for an informational paper?

Select one or more of the following:

  • dialogue

  • anecdotes

  • rhetorical question

  • Action

  • Foreshadowing

  • fragment

  • startling fact, odd statement, statistic

  • flashback

  • igurative Language

Question 9 of 24

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What makes a good thesis for an informational paper? Include all correct answers.

Select one or more of the following:

  • Teachers have influenced my life.

  • Going to college prepares a person for the future and it is increasingly expensive.

  • There are many different types of students in college today.

  • Students have developed a variety of techniques to conceal inadequate study from their instructors and they often get away with it.

Question 10 of 24

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Choose all of the following that makes a good thesis statement for an informational paper?

Select one or more of the following:

  • A thesis should be as specific as possible

  • A thesis be persuasive

  • A good thesis provides the structure of the paper.

  • A good thesis provides lots of specific evidence

  • A thesis statement should lead to evidence.

Question 11 of 24

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Which of the following is correct?

Select one of the following:

  • In the end, Severin was unable to trace Odysseus’ journey. He concluded that “the geographies of folklore and navigation overlapped” (Severin 245).

  • In the end, Severin was unable to trace Odysseus’ journey. He concluded that, “the geographies of folklore and navigation overlapped” (Severin 245).

  • In the end, Severin was unable to trace Odysseus’ journey. He concluded that, “The geographies of folklore and navigation overlapped” (Severin 245).

  • In the end, Severin was unable to trace Odysseus’ journey. He concluded that, “The geographies of folklore and navigation overlapped” (245).

Question 12 of 24

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For an informational paper, you want to consider all of the following for body paragraphs.

Select one or more of the following:

  • Process order

  • Main ideas from outline into the paper

  • sufficient and well-chosen evidence

  • try to include refuting arguements

  • logical order and transitions

  • domain-specific vocabulary explained

  • look for opportunities to include action

  • look for opportunities to include graphics

Question 13 of 24

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When considering a conclusion for an informational paper, you should do all of the following:

Select one or more of the following:

  • Sum up the answer you have found to your essay prompt

  • leave your audience with something to think about, such as the overall importance of your topic

  • leave your audience with something to think about, such as unanswered questions

  • leave your audience with something to think about, such as ideas for new research

  • Put in any ideas that you forgot to include in your body paragraphs

  • leave your audience with something to think about, such as a possible sequal

  • Include a nice climactic ending.

Question 14 of 24

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Choose all the correct answers for the following question: Which sentence(s) are punctuated properly?

Select one or more of the following:

  • After you ran out of money you called your parents, but only my sister was home, unfortunately.

  • I’m a not-so-rich person, but I can do the following: offer you a small loan, offer you some temporary work or help you find a new job.

  • "Yes I'll go to the store," said Dr. Winston, the guy with the top hat.

Question 15 of 24

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Choose all the correct answers for the following question: What constitues plagiarism?

Select one or more of the following:

  • Using George Washington's birthday, without citing.

  • Using Proverbs, without citing

  • Quoting word-for-word a passage and citing the author.

  • Putting the information in your own words and not citing.

Question 16 of 24

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Which is an example of a properly cited passage. Knox, Bernard. Introductuion. The Odyssesy of Homer. Trans. Robert Fagles.

Select one of the following:

  • The third-century-B.C. geographer Eratosthenes, for example, thought that Homer’s story was totally imaginary (Knox 25).

  • The great Alexandrian geographer Eratosthenes said that trying to identify Odysseus’ ports of call would be a wild goose chase.

  • The third-century-B.C. geographer Eratosthenes, for example, thought that Homer’s story was totally imaginary (Knox, 25).

  • The great Alexandrian geographer Eratosthenes said that trying to identify Odysseus’ ports of call would be a wild goose chase. (Knox)

Question 17 of 24

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What things do readers look for to identify characterization?

Select one or more of the following:

  • What characters do

  • What characters say

  • What other people say about the character

  • What the author says about the character

  • What my friend says about the character

Question 18 of 24

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Which sentence is correct?

Select one of the following:

  • The boys, while playing checkers, is arguing.

  • The boys, while playing checkers, has been arguing.

  • The girls, even though they are sleepy, want to stay up later.

Question 19 of 24

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Which sentence best displays parallel structure?

Select one of the following:

  • The orchestra played a great concert tonight.

  • They played loudly, they played softly, they played brilliantly.

  • The programs included both Mozart and Beethoven.

  • The applause, when the concert was over, lasted for ten minutes.

Question 20 of 24

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Which sentence best displays parallel structure?

Select one of the following:

  • The wedding guests felt that it was both a long ceremony and very dull.

  • The wedding guests felt that the ceremony was long and also dull.

  • Science used to be taught by the textbook method, but now it is taught by the experimental method.

Question 21 of 24

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What narrative point of view does the author use in lines 21-28?

Over the last three decades, fast food
has infiltrated every nook and cranny of
American society. An industry that began
with a handful of modest hot dog and
5 hamburger stands in southern California
has spread to every corner of the nation,
selling a broad range of foods wherever
paying customers may be found. Fast
food is now served at restaurants and
10 drive-throughs, at stadiums, airports,
zoos, high schools, elementary schools,
and universities, on cruise ships, trains,
and airplanes, at gas stations, and even
at hospital cafeterias. Americans now
15 spend more money on fast food than on
higher education, personal computers,
computer software, or new cars. They
spend more on fast food than on movies,
books, magazines, newspapers, videos,
20 and recorded music—combined.

Pull open the glass door, feel the rush of
cool air, walk in, get in line, study the
backlit color photographs above the
counter, place your order, hand over a
25 few dollars, watch teenagers in uniforms
pushing various buttons, and moments
later take hold of a plastic tray full of food
wrapped in colored paper and cardboard.
The whole experience of buying fast food
30 has become so routine, like brushing
your teeth or stopping for a red light. It
has become a social custom as
American as a small, rectangular, handheld,
frozen, and reheated apple pie.

35 Hundreds of millions of people buy fast
food every day without giving it much
thought, unaware of the subtle and not
so subtle ramifications of their
purchases. They rarely consider where
40 this food came from, how it was made,
what it is doing to the community around
them. They just grab their tray off the
counter, find a table, take a seat, unwrap
the paper, and dig in. The whole
45 experience is transitory and soon
forgotten. People should know what lies
behind the shiny, happy surface of every
fast food transaction. They should know
what really lurks between those sesame50
seed buns. As the old saying goes: You
are what you eat.

Select one of the following:

  • First person

  • Second person

  • Third person, limited

  • Third person, omniscient

Question 22 of 24

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Which word best describes the author's tone in lines 31-34?

Over the last three decades, fast food
has infiltrated every nook and cranny of
American society. An industry that began
with a handful of modest hot dog and
5 hamburger stands in southern California
has spread to every corner of the nation,
selling a broad range of foods wherever
paying customers may be found. Fast
food is now served at restaurants and
10 drive-throughs, at stadiums, airports,
zoos, high schools, elementary schools,
and universities, on cruise ships, trains,
and airplanes, at gas stations, and even
at hospital cafeterias. Americans now
15 spend more money on fast food than on
higher education, personal computers,
computer software, or new cars. They
spend more on fast food than on movies,
books, magazines, newspapers, videos,
20 and recorded music—combined.

Pull open the glass door, feel the rush of
cool air, walk in, get in line, study the
backlit color photographs above the
counter, place your order, hand over a
25 few dollars, watch teenagers in uniforms
pushing various buttons, and moments
later take hold of a plastic tray full of food
wrapped in colored paper and cardboard.
The whole experience of buying fast food
30 has become so routine, like brushing
your teeth or stopping for a red light. It
has become a social custom as
American as a small, rectangular, handheld,
frozen, and reheated apple pie.

35 Hundreds of millions of people buy fast
food every day without giving it much
thought, unaware of the subtle and not
so subtle ramifications of their
purchases. They rarely consider where
40 this food came from, how it was made,
what it is doing to the community around
them. They just grab their tray off the
counter, find a table, take a seat, unwrap
the paper, and dig in. The whole
45 experience is transitory and soon
forgotten. People should know what lies
behind the shiny, happy surface of every
fast food transaction. They should know
what really lurks between those sesame50
seed buns. As the old saying goes: You
are what you eat.

Select one of the following:

  • cheerful

  • ironic

  • optimistic

  • sad

Question 23 of 24

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What type of conclusion is being used in the following model?

If this state continues to permit landowners to drain wetlands, we will see a tremendous decline in the numbers and variety of wildlife.

Select one of the following:

  • Restate Controlling Idea

  • Ask a Question

  • Make a Recommendation

  • Make a Prediction

Question 24 of 24

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What types of transitions are being used in the following model?

*Because* a tree fell across the electric wires Monday night, we lost our electricity for four hours. At first, the lights went out. *Then*, we found a flashlight in a drawer. *Next*, we went to our camping supplies to find our lanterns. *Soon* we were playing Monopoly as a family.

Select one of the following:

  • Spatial Relationships

  • Time or Sequence

  • Degree of importance

  • Cause and Effect

  • Compare and Contrast

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English Quiz

Niat Habtemariam
Quiz by , created about 3 years ago

College Credit English (English) Quiz on English Quiz, created by Niat Habtemariam on 15/11/2013.

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Niat Habtemariam
Created by Niat Habtemariam about 3 years ago
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