Changing Health Behaviour Exam - Enactive Mastery Test

Question 1 of 24

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Which 3 of the following are methods we learned to influence attitude?

Select one or more of the following:

  • Gain frame vs loss frame arguments

  • Cognitive vs affective arguments

  • Moderators: argument quality and involvement

  • Presentation of risk information

  • Narrative techniques

  • Fear appeals

  • Enactive mastery

  • Modelling/vicarious experience

  • Social support

  • Action planning

Question 2 of 24

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Which 3 of the following are methods we learned to influence risk perception?

Select one or more of the following:

  • Presentation of risk information

  • Narrative techniques

  • Fear appeals

  • Gain frame vs loss frame arguments

  • Cognitive vs affective arguments

  • Moderators: argument quality and involvement

  • Enactive mastery

  • Modelling/vicarious experience

  • Social support

  • Action planning

Question 3 of 24

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Which 3 of the following are methods we learned to influence social influence and self-efficacy?

Select one or more of the following:

  • Enactive mastery

  • Modelling/vicarious experience

  • Social support

  • Presentation of risk information

  • Narrative techniques

  • Fear appeals

  • Gain frame vs loss frame arguments

  • Cognitive vs affective arguments

  • Moderators: argument quality and involvement

  • Coping planning

Question 4 of 24

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Which 3 of the following are methods we learned to influence bad habits and the intention-behaviour gap?

Select one or more of the following:

  • Action planning

  • Coping Planning

  • Retraining

  • Enactive mastery

  • Modelling/vicarious experience

  • Social support

  • Presentation of risk information

  • Narrative techniques

  • Fear appeals

  • Cognitive vs affective arguments

Question 5 of 24

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Fill the blank spaces to complete the text.

From which 2 theories is enactive mastery derived? Se theory and
Sy theory

Question 6 of 24

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Central elements of enactive mastery
1. Enactive mastery is a method that can be described as ‘( learning by doing, figuring something out, copying another person )’. When a person learns to ‘master’ a certain task by performing it and achieve success. When a person succeeds, the person build a belief in their own ( efficacy, power, confidence ). Failure can do the opposite and can undermine it. (Bandura, 1997) Example: When you were little you were learned how to tie your shoes, by doing it. After you ‘master’ this task, you believe that you can tie your shoes yourself.

Question 7 of 24

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Central elements of enactive mastery
2. Pre-existing (ideas people have about themselves) - can bias processing of SE information. ƒ If someone has pre-existing beliefs about their own self-efficacy or capability, it’s to challenge these beliefs. ƒ If someone has the behaviour, it is more difficult to challenge existing beliefs about self-efficacy.

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    self-knowledge
    self-knowledge
    skills
    skills
    information
    information
    difficult
    difficult
    straightforward
    straightforward
    easy
    easy
    experience with
    experience with
    read about
    read about
    had friends
    had friends

Question 8 of 24

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Central elements enactive mastery
Repeated failure will ----------- SE.

Select one or more of the following:

  • boost

  • damage

Question 9 of 24

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Central elements - enactive mastery
Task ( difficulty, enjoyment, interest ) ƒ
Easy tasks: if too easy, people think they can do anything, but then they can’t handle it when something turns out to be challenging - they don’t know how to manage that - so easy tasks have ( no effect, a big impact ) on self-efficacy beliefs. ƒ
Difficult tasks: will affect self-efficacy beliefs, if you fail sometimes in difficult situations, you learn even more from it.
FOR INTERVENTIONS TASK SHOULD ( NOT BE TOO EASY, BE INTERESTING, REQUIRE NO REAL EFFORT ) BUT SHOULD BE A BIT CHALLENGING.

Question 10 of 24

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Selecting enactive mastery over alternative methods
Enactive mastery is more influential because it produces stronger and more generalized ( efficacy, behavioural, positive ) beliefs than only using the method ( vicarious, observational, imaginative ) experiences (experience by watching, hearing or reading someone else doing a task/behaviour), cognitive simulations ( or verbal instruction (getting instruction by a tutorial for instance). (( Bandura, Jones, Swinburn ) 1997)

Question 11 of 24

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Enactive mastery is not relevant for this target group because they are incapable of self-appraisal

Select one of the following:

  • very young children

  • addicts

  • adolescents

Question 12 of 24

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Enactive mastery - which of the following are parameters for use?

Select one or more of the following:

  • Non simulated situation - the person feels that what they achieved was a success, and they really did it themselves (i.e. they weren’t just told about the experience).

  • ACTIVE LEARNING PROCESS - people process the information they gain - “I can do it, it wasn’t that hard.” They appraise their specific behaviour.

  • one who wishes to persuade must appear credible, trustworthy, confident and non-threatening. "I believe the other people I have seen doing this behaviour are just like me, so I can do it too."

  • individual needs to be committed to the goal. "I really want to make this change."

  • High risk situations require practice of coping response. Helping people to plan what they will do when things get really difficult.

Question 13 of 24

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Choose 3 factors which contribute to self-efficacy formation through enactive mastery

Select one or more of the following:

  • effort

  • task difficulty

  • natural setting

  • relaxed atmosphere

  • charismatic role models

  • financial rewards

  • very positive feedback from peers

Question 14 of 24

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Enactive mastery
Mastering a task which is far from where the target group is right now is really challenging - a complex set of behaviours that make up the target behaviour. Important to ( break it down into smaller elements, push participants as much as possible, make noticeable progress very fast, remind participants of their faults )
Using graded tasks = small steps, getting gradually more difficult - helps people ( avoid failure, enjoy the experience, improve their attitude ) and helps people ( learn as they go along, quickly become experts, show others how to do the behaviour ).

Question 15 of 24

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Interventions should aim to demand an intermediate level of effort expenditure when using enactive mastery. Why?

Select one or more of the following:

  • Because if it takes people little effort to achieve a difficult task, it will boost their self-efficacy.

  • Because if it takes people a lot of effort to achieve an easy task, it will lower their self-efficacy.

  • Because if people have to make an intermediate level of effort, the lazy participants will work harder to keep up with the others.

Question 16 of 24

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( Enactive mastery, Vicarious learning, Coping planning ) is a source of self-efficacy (learning by doing it yourself).

You get experience of successes in performing a specific behaviour - see that you’re capable of doing it.

Having experience of performing a behaviour tells you how well you’re doing, and then you think you can do similar other tasks - can be translated to other ( comparable, enjoyable, really difficult ) behaviours.

Question 17 of 24

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Central elements of enactive mastery
CONTEXT - In conditions, successes will help boost SE - failure will SE. e.g. I still trained for the 10km even though I was really busy and stressed - I still did it!! But if I failed, I will blame the stressful situation - so I won’t feel like I failed.

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    adverse
    adverse
    easy
    easy
    familiar
    familiar
    not reduce
    not reduce
    increase
    increase

Question 18 of 24

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Central elements of enactive mastery
CONTEXT - success has more influence on beliefs than success achieved with help - IF PEOPLE CAN SEE, ‘HEY, I DID IT’ that’s more effective than saying, ‘WELL, I COULD ONLY DO THAT BECAUSE SOMEONE HELPED ME’. People should attribute success to .

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    Self-achieved
    Self-achieved
    Vicarious
    Vicarious
    Extraordinary
    Extraordinary
    efficacy
    efficacy
    social
    social
    health
    health
    themselves
    themselves
    their peers
    their peers
    health promoters
    health promoters

Question 19 of 24

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According to the Social Cognitive Theory (from Bandura), we are not just influenced by our circumstances, but we contribute to them.

Select one or more of the following:

  • Self-efficacy is what an individual believes he or she can accomplish using his or her skills under certain circumstances.

  • Self-efficacy is a feeling that someone will inevitably succeed.

  • Self-efficacy is making a greater effort and sacrifice than other participants.

  • Self-efficacy is effectiveness to perform a task based on skills and experience.

Question 20 of 24

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According to the , if I believe I can do something, then I am more motivated to do it, and I am more to do it, so self-efficacy functions as a self-fulfilling prophecy. Self-efficacy has influence over people's ability to , their motivation and their , as people will often attempt to learn and perform only those tasks for which they believe they will be successful.

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    Self-Efficacy Theory
    Self-Efficacy Theory
    Theory of Planned Behaviour
    Theory of Planned Behaviour
    I-Change Model
    I-Change Model
    likely
    likely
    able
    able
    satisfied
    satisfied
    learn
    learn
    self-appraise
    self-appraise
    give feedback
    give feedback
    performance
    performance
    enjoyment
    enjoyment
    social network
    social network

Question 21 of 24

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Which 2 of the following are the main determinants of the intention to perform a behaviour?

Select one or more of the following:

  • self-efficacy

  • outcome expectation

  • subjective norm

  • attitude

  • threat appraisal

Question 22 of 24

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Enactive Mastery
Success can result in more ( perseverance, disinterest, laziness ) in trying to accomplish the task – ( failure, too much success, competition ) can undermine this.

Question 23 of 24

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Enactive mastery -
Mastery expectations can transfer from one behaviour/task to another and result in ( more generalized, weaker, contradictory ) self-efficacy beliefs.

Question 24 of 24

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Central elements of enactive mastery
3. help in building self-efficacy, through cognitive processes and .
Not ‘objective’ success, but of success is important.ƒ biases in your own personal appraisal, based on previous experience - if I think, “Oh, I tried that so many times, but I don’t think I can do it,” negative self-perception - I interpret all information about this behaviour through this self-perception. VERY DIFFICULT TO .

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    Successes
    Successes
    Competitors
    Competitors
    Failures
    Failures
    Models
    Models
    appraisal
    appraisal
    rewards
    rewards
    stronger social network
    stronger social network
    perception
    perception
    presentation
    presentation
    appreciation
    appreciation
    OVERCOME SELF-PERCEPTION
    OVERCOME SELF-PERCEPTION
    REDUCE PERSONAL BIAS
    REDUCE PERSONAL BIAS
    INTERPRET BEHAVIOURAL INFORMATION
    INTERPRET BEHAVIOURAL INFORMATION
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Changing Health Behaviour Exam - Enactive Mastery Test

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Quiz by , created about 1 year ago

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Created by alison.uu about 1 year ago
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