GCSE Psychology UNIT 1. TOPIC A.

Question 1 of 10

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On your retina, cones can detect the different colours of light and rods can detect intensity of light and movement.

Select one of the following:

  • True
  • False

Question 2 of 10

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Which is the definition of continuity?

Select one of the following:

  • Things which are close together are seen as a group

  • things that look alike are seen as a group

  • we tend to fill in the gaps to make incomplete things seem whole

  • we tend to separate scenes into objects and their surroundings

  • we link things together that appear to form an unbroken line

Question 3 of 10

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Which is the definition for proximity?

Select one of the following:

  • Things which are close together are seen as a group

  • Things that look alike are seen as a group

  • we tend to fill in the gaps to make incomplete things seem whole

  • we tend to separate scenes into objects and their surroundings

  • we link things together that appear to form an unbroken line

Question 4 of 10

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Which is the definition of figure ground?

Select one of the following:

  • Things which are close together are seen as a group

  • Things that look alike are seen as a group

  • we tend to fill in the gaps to make incomplete things seem whole

  • we tend to separate scenes into objects and their surroundings

  • we link things together that appear to form an unbroken line

Question 5 of 10

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Check the correct box(s).
Correctly identify parts of "Bartletts (1932) Schemas and remembering stories" experiment that are correct.

Select one or more of the following:

  • All of the tests used a folk tale called "War of the Ghosts" that was used because if was from a different culture to ours and hence was unfamiliar to the participant.

  • Bartlett found that he should have used a familiar fairy tale story instead of a folk tale. This is because it is unfair to test peoples memories on something they are not familiar with since their results would have been effected. This is a weakness of the experiment.

  • Bartlett used a technique called the repeated reproduction task; this is when a participant is given some information, such as a story to read, then it is taken away and they are asked to reproduce it.

  • Bartlett found that, although the task appeared difficult, many more people than expected recalled the story accurately. Bartlett found that this was a weakness that disproved his hypothesis which is why his experiment holds little reliability.

  • Bartlett concluded that unfamiliar material changes when it is recalled. It becomes shorter, simpler and more stereotyped. This may be due to the effect of schema on memory.

Question 6 of 10

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Schemas can effect eyewitness testimony.

Select one of the following:

  • True
  • False

Question 7 of 10

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What is the independent variable in an experiment?

Select one of the following:

  • The term used to describe what is being manipulated (changed/varied) in a study or experiment.

  • The term used to describe what is being measured in an experiment.

Question 8 of 10

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What is the dependent variable in an experiment?

Select one of the following:

  • The term used to describe what is being manipulated (changed/varied) in a study or experiment.

  • The term used to describe what is being measured in an experiment.

Question 9 of 10

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Can a person who is blind in one eye use stereopsis as a cue to depth?

Select one of the following:

  • Yes, but only if they're blind in their weaker eye

  • No, stereopsis is a binocular depth cue which requires both eyes

  • Yes, stereopsis is a monocular depth cue so it only requires one eye to work

Question 10 of 10

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What is a distortion illusion?

Select one of the following:

  • The perception of objects that are genuinely not there but the observer "sees" them to be there. Sometimes they perceive edges and believe that a shape exists when really it doesn't. An example of this is the Kanizsa Triangle.

  • These make objects look bigger, smaller, longer, shorter or a different shape entirely. It occurs when our perception is deceived by some aspect of the stimulus.

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GCSE Psychology UNIT 1. TOPIC A.

Chelsea Lowe
Quiz by , created over 2 years ago

This is a quick quiz based on topic A of unit 1 in psychology at GCSE level! Just a quick little way of recalling your knowledge and a quick revision tool! *Note: I am with the edexcel exam board so questions will be based around those topics!

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Chelsea Lowe
Created by Chelsea Lowe over 2 years ago
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