Middle Ages Medicine Quiz

Aimee Robbins
Quiz by Aimee Robbins, updated more than 1 year ago
Aimee Robbins
Created by Aimee Robbins almost 2 years ago
3
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Description

GCSE History Quiz on Middle Ages Medicine Quiz, created by Aimee Robbins on 09/26/2018.

Resource summary

Question 1

Question
Illness in the [blank_start]Middle Ages[blank_end] was explained in many ways; many of which were very unjustified and had no scientific explanation. Firstly, the Four [blank_start]Humours[blank_end] ([blank_start]phlegm[blank_end], black bile, yellow bile and blood) were the reason behind illness. If they were [blank_start]unbalanced[blank_end], you were ill and due to [blank_start]Hippocrates[blank_end] and Galen's theories, they used Treatment of [blank_start]Opposites[blank_end]. You'd be [blank_start]bled[blank_end] to reduce blood, cleaned using an enema or made to cough up blood to reduce [blank_start]black bile[blank_end], made sick (often using salt water) to reduce [blank_start]yellow bile[blank_end] and [blank_start]coughed[blank_end] to reduce phlegm. This obviously didn't work.
Answer
  • Middle Ages
  • phlegm
  • Humours
  • unbalanced
  • Hippocrates
  • Opposites
  • bled
  • black bile
  • yellow bile
  • coughed

Question 2

Question
God was a believed cause of illness.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 3

Question
There were people who believed God caused disease. Why did they think God sent it?
Answer
  • To send them all to Hell.
  • To select people he wanted to go to heaven and chose the ones to send to Hell.
  • To punish them for their sins and allow them to go to Heaven, after repaying their sins.

Question 4

Question
Many other people believed that 'bad air' caused disease and that smelling the foul streets would cause illness. What was their name for 'bad air'?
Answer
  • Miasma
  • 'Miamsa'
  • 'Miassma'
  • 'Mank airo'

Question 5

Question
[blank_start]Jews[blank_end] were blamed for disease, especially the [blank_start]Plague[blank_end], and accused of poisoning the [blank_start]wells[blank_end], leading to many of them being burned to [blank_start]death[blank_end].
Answer
  • Jews
  • Christians
  • Wise Women
  • Healers
  • Plague
  • Cold
  • Flu
  • wells
  • streets
  • homes
  • mud
  • death
  • pain
  • agony
  • submission

Question 6

Question
People did still believe in the [blank_start]four humours[blank_end], so when really bad diseases were contracted, some blamed [blank_start]'evil humours'[blank_end]. Not only were they out of balance, but they were all against you and you have to [blank_start]release the evil[blank_end].
Answer
  • four humours
  • 'evil humours'
  • release the evil

Question 7

Question
What was God said to be controlling, which would influence your contraction of diseases?
Answer
  • The planets
  • The animals
  • The air
  • The streets

Question 8

Question
There were many ways to prevent disease in the Middle Ages, including the [blank_start]flagellant[blank_end] technique (publicly punishing yourself, begging for [blank_start]forgiveness[blank_end]) and people would go pilgrimages to pray at the tombs of [blank_start]saints[blank_end]. To avoid the disgusting streets, [blank_start]rakers[blank_end] were recruited to clean streets and people would carry [blank_start]herbs[blank_end] to stop the smell affecting them. The biggest prevention was praying, since people strongly believed [blank_start]God[blank_end] was responsible for everything. Kings and bishops ordered [blank_start]services[blank_end] when disease broke out, praying for the deaths to cease, furthermore, people stopped any activities they felt to be insulting [blank_start]God[blank_end]. Some would fast, sacrificing themselves to show God they are [blank_start]sorry[blank_end] for their [blank_start]sins[blank_end].
Answer
  • flagellant
  • forgiveness
  • saints
  • rakers
  • herbs
  • God
  • services
  • God
  • sorry
  • sins

Question 9

Question
Some people believed that God was the only person who could stop disease and they didn't believe in treatment.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 10

Question
A treatment for the plague was to pop the buboes and put potatoes around them, before burying them.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 11

Question
Wise [blank_start]women[blank_end] were the doctors of [blank_start]poor[blank_end] people, who lived on the outskirts of a village using natural resources from around her home to make [blank_start]herbal remedies[blank_end]. Due to having [blank_start]poor[blank_end] customers, she'd often trade her services for [blank_start]food[blank_end] or household jobs. Later on, they were unfortunately blamed for [blank_start]witchcraft[blank_end], due to living alone, mixing medical potions and being renowned for not being able to always prevent death and owning a black [blank_start]cat[blank_end].
Answer
  • women
  • men
  • children
  • poor
  • rich
  • herbal remedies
  • potions
  • antibiotics
  • poor
  • rich
  • food
  • water
  • clothes
  • witchcraft
  • wizardry
  • murder
  • cat
  • dog
  • horse
  • cow

Question 12

Question
The germs from midwives hands caused the death of many parents and complications of the time killed many kids.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 13

Question
Who were midwives for the poor, who couldn't afford to pay someone?
Answer
  • Relatives
  • Neighbours

Question 14

Question
Hospitals were for people who couldn't [blank_start]look after[blank_end] themselves and rarely admitted the [blank_start]sick[blank_end] to prevent the spread of [blank_start]diseases[blank_end]. They were also incredibly [blank_start]small[blank_end] and were used by people who were most likely to [blank_start]die[blank_end] in there.
Answer
  • look after
  • sick
  • diseases
  • small
  • die

Question 15

Question
Physicians trained at university for 8 years.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 16

Question
Only the rich were physicians, as they were the ones who could afford university.
Answer
  • True
  • False
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