Perinatal Adaptions Lecture I

Matthew Coulson
Quiz by Matthew Coulson, updated more than 1 year ago
Matthew Coulson
Created by Matthew Coulson over 2 years ago
4
1

Description

Perinatal adaptions I lecture given on the monday morning of week 5

Resource summary

Question 1

Question
In neonates, the patent blood vessel that shunts blood from the pulmonary artery to the aorta is known as the [blank_start]ductus arteriosus[blank_end]
Answer
  • ductus arteriosus

Question 2

Question
At what point in gestation do the alveoli develop? [blank_start]36 weeks[blank_end] gestation
Answer
  • 36 weeks
  • 30 weeks
  • 34 weeks

Question 3

Question
Later in the pregnancy, the amniotic fluid is mostly made up of which fluid produced by the foetus? Foetal [blank_start]urine[blank_end]
Answer
  • urine

Question 4

Question
Which organ(s), which allow processing of amniotic fluid when swallowed by the foetus, plays an important role in amniotic fluid recycling?
Answer
  • The kidneys
  • The liver
  • The stomach
  • The pancreas

Question 5

Question
Which maternal antibody is passed from mother to baby via the placenta?
Answer
  • IgG
  • IgA
  • IgE
  • IgD

Question 6

Question
The ductus venosus allows bypassing of which organ by the foetal blood before birth? The [blank_start]liver[blank_end]
Answer
  • liver

Question 7

Question
The foramen ovale, which closes after birth, causes a [blank_start]right to left[blank_end] shunting of blood whilst the foetus is still inside the uterus
Answer
  • right to left
  • left to right

Question 8

Question
No blood whatsoever is transported to the lungs in the growing foetus
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 9

Question
In adults, the remnant of the ductus venosus is called the [blank_start]ligamentum teres[blank_end] of the liver
Answer
  • ligamentum teres

Question 10

Question
In adults, the remnant of the ductus arteriosus is known as the [blank_start]ligamentum arteriosus[blank_end]
Answer
  • ligamentum arteriosus

Question 11

Question
Unlike anywhere else in the body, [blank_start]oxygen[blank_end] acts as a vasoconstrictor in the ductus arteriosus thus contributing towards its closure following birth. [blank_start]A reduction[blank_end] in the level of prostaglandins in the blood also contributes towards ductus arteriosus closure following birth
Answer
  • A reduction
  • An increase
  • oxygen
  • nitrogen
  • carbon dioxide

Question 12

Question
Oxygen typically acts as a [blank_start]vasodilator[blank_end] in the body's blood vessels
Answer
  • vasodilator
  • vasoconstrictor

Question 13

Question
The foramen in the foetal heart allowing right to left shunting of blood via the atria is called the foramen [blank_start]ovale[blank_end]
Answer
  • ovale

Question 14

Question
Which form of fat is produced in excess by the foetus in the final stages of pregnancy in order to facilitate thermogeneration upon entrance to the world?
Answer
  • White fat
  • Brown fat

Question 15

Question
Fat Types: [blank_start]White fat[blank_end] = Good for energy storage [blank_start]Brown fat[blank_end] = Good for quick breakdown and energy release (e.g. thermogeneration)
Answer
  • Brown fat
  • White fat

Question 16

Question
The fat pad that typically generates between the scapulae of the foetus in late pregnancy typically consists of which type of fat? [blank_start]Brown[blank_end] fat
Answer
  • Brown
  • White

Question 17

Question
One of the main worries for the baby during late pregnancy/labour/birth is the development of hypoxia. Hypoxia in a foetus would likely lead to ...
Answer
  • Metabolic acidosis
  • Metabolic alkalosis
  • Respiratory acidosis
  • Respiratory alkalosis

Question 18

Question
Persistence of the foetal circulation (patent foramen ovale/ductus arteriosus/etc) can lead to the pulmonary vessels not opening properly thus causing persistent pulmonary [blank_start]hypertension[blank_end] of the newborn (PPHN)
Answer
  • hypertension
  • hypotension

Question 19

Question
Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension of the Newborn is investigated by measuring the oxygen saturations of the hands and feet. In a case of PPHN: The [blank_start]hands[blank_end] will have a near normal O2 saturation The [blank_start]feet[blank_end] will have an abnormal O2 saturation
Answer
  • feet
  • hands
  • hands
  • feet

Question 20

Question
Management of PPHN is via multiple processes, one of which is ventilation using oxygen and which other vasodilating molecule? [blank_start]Nitric oxide[blank_end]
Answer
  • Nitric oxide

Question 21

Question
Inotropes such as [blank_start]adrenaline[blank_end] are also given in order to raise the [blank_start]systemic[blank_end] blood pressure above the [blank_start]pulmonary[blank_end] pressure thus allowing the blood to force itself into the pulmonary circulation, hopefully solving the problem.
Answer
  • adrenaline
  • oxytocin
  • oxygen
  • magnesium sulphate
  • systemic
  • pulmonary
  • pulmonary
  • systemic

Question 22

Question
Transient [blank_start]tachypnoea[blank_end] occurs in infants when there is insufficient clearing of fluid from the foetal lungs
Answer
  • tachypnoea

Question 23

Question
Neonates typically do not shiver in order to produce heat. Preterm neonates are therefore more likely to become hypothermic due to a lower content of [blank_start]brown fat[blank_end]
Answer
  • brown fat
  • white fat
  • glycogen

Question 24

Question
The dark green substance forming the first faeces of a newborn infant is called the [blank_start]meconium[blank_end]
Answer
  • meconium

Question 25

Question
When something touches a neonate's mouth, it instinctively opens it's mouth and tries to latch onto it. What is this reflex called? The [blank_start]rooting[blank_end] reflex
Answer
  • rooting

Question 26

Question
Noramly breastfeeding should involve the neonate's tongue pushing the nipple against the [blank_start]soft[blank_end] palate in order to facilitate lactation
Answer
  • soft
  • hard

Question 27

Question
Foetal blood is [blank_start]more[blank_end] concentrated in haemoglobin than adult blood
Answer
  • more
  • less

Question 28

Question
For which of the following reasons does Foetal Haemoglobin have a higher affinity for oxygen?
Answer
  • It does not interact with 2,3-DPG
  • It does interact with 2,3-DPG
  • It does not respond to changes in temperature
  • It does respond to changes in temperature
  • It does not respond to changes in CO2 content of the foetal blood
  • It does respond to changes in CO2 content of the foetal blood

Question 29

Question
Foetal haemoglobin is produced in the [blank_start]liver[blank_end] Adult haemoglobin is produced in the [blank_start]bone marrow[blank_end]
Answer
  • liver
  • bone marrow

Question 30

Question
Newborns can typically become anaemic as the foetal haemoglobin is broken down faster than the adult haemoglobin can be produced to replace it
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 31

Question
Haemoglobin breakdown yields which substance? [blank_start]Bilirubin[blank_end]
Answer
  • Bilirubin

Question 32

Question
Accumulation of bilirubin in the foetal circulation causes neonatal [blank_start]jaundice[blank_end]
Answer
  • jaundice

Question 33

Question
Foetal jaundice is a case of accumulation of [blank_start]unconjugated[blank_end] bilirubin
Answer
  • unconjugated
  • conjugated
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