test 1

vidyadhar
Quiz by vidyadhar, updated more than 1 year ago
vidyadhar
Created by vidyadhar over 6 years ago
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Question 1

Question
The sum of the factors of a number is 124. What is the number?
Answer
  • Number lies between 40 and 50
  • Number lies between 50 and 60
  • Number lies between 60 and 80
  • More than one such number exists

Question 2

Question
The product of 4 consecutive even numbers is always divisible by
Answer
  • 600
  • 768
  • 864
  • 384

Question 3

Question
Sum of first 25 terms in AP is 525, sum of the next 25 terms is 725, what is the common difference?
Answer
  • 8/25
  • 4/25
  • 6/25
  • 1/5

Question 4

Question
The pie-chart shows the percentage distribution of the expenditure incurred in publishing a book. Study the pie-chart and the answer the questions based on it. 1. If for a certain quantity of books, the publisher has to pay Rs. 30,600 as printing cost, then what will be amount of royalty to be paid for these books?
Answer
  • 19,450
  • 21,200
  • 22,950
  • 26,150

Question 5

Question
Q4 continues 2. What is the central angle of the sector corresponding to the expenditure incurred on Royalty?
Answer
  • 15º
  • 24º
  • 54º
  • 48º

Question 6

Question
Q4 continues The price of the book is marked 20% above the C.P. If the marked price of the book is Rs. 180, then what is the cost of the paper used in a single copy of the book?
Answer
  • 36
  • 37.5
  • 45
  • 45.62

Question 7

Question
Q4 continues If 5500 copies are published and the transportation cost on them amounts to Rs. 82500, then what should be the selling price of the book so that the publisher can earn a profit of 25%?
Answer
  • 187.50
  • 191.50
  • 175
  • 180

Question 8

Question
Q4 continues Royalty on the book is less than the printing cost by:
Answer
  • 5%
  • 33(1/5)%
  • 20%
  • 25%

Question 9

Question
LOGICAL REASONING : Mr Bankatlal acted as a judge for the beauty contest. There were four participants, viz. Ms Andhra Pradesh, Ms Uttar Pradesh, Ms West Bengal and Ms Maharashtra. Mrs Bankatlal, who was very anxious about the result, asked him about it as soon as he was back home. Mr Bankatlal just told that the one who was wearing the yellow saree won the contest. When Mrs Bankatlal pressed for further details, he elaborated as follows: 1. All of them were sitting in a row. 2. All of them wore sarees of different colours, viz. green, yellow, white, red. 3. There was only one runner-up and she was sitting beside Ms. Maharashtra. 4 .The runner-up was wearing the green saree. 5. Ms West Bengal was not sitting at the ends and was not the runner up. 6 .The winner and the runner-up are not sitting adjacent to each other. 7 .Ms Maharashtra was wearing white saree. 8 .Ms Andhra Pradesh was not wearing the green saree. 9 .Participants wearing yellow saree and white saree were at the ends. Question 1: Who wore the red saree?
Answer
  • Ms Andhra Pradesh
  • Ms West Bengal
  • Ms Uttar Pradesh
  • Ms Maharashtra

Question 10

Question
Q9 continues Mr Bankatlal acted as a judge for the beauty contest. There were four participants, viz. Ms Andhra Pradesh, Ms Uttar Pradesh, Ms West Bengal and Ms Maharashtra. Mrs Bankatlal, who was very anxious about the result, asked him about it as soon as he was back home. Mr Bankatlal just told that the one who was wearing the yellow saree won the contest. When Mrs Bankatlal pressed for further details, he elaborated as follows: 1. All of them were sitting in a row. 2. All of them wore sarees of different colours, viz. green, yellow, white, red. 3. There was only one runner-up and she was sitting beside Ms. Maharashtra. 4 .The runner-up was wearing the green saree. 5. Ms West Bengal was not sitting at the ends and was not the runner up. 6 .The winner and the runner-up are not sitting adjacent to each other. 7 .Ms Maharashtra was wearing white saree. 8 .Ms Andhra Pradesh was not wearing the green saree. 9 .Participants wearing yellow saree and white saree were at the ends. Question 2: Ms. West Bengal was sitting adjacent to
Answer
  • Ms Andhra Pradesh and Ms Maharashtra
  • Ms Uttar Pradesh and Ms Maharashtra
  • Ms Andhra Pradesh and Ms Uttar Pradesh
  • Ms Uttar Pradesh

Question 11

Question
Q9 continues Mr Bankatlal acted as a judge for the beauty contest. There were four participants, viz. Ms Andhra Pradesh, Ms Uttar Pradesh, Ms West Bengal and Ms Maharashtra. Mrs Bankatlal, who was very anxious about the result, asked him about it as soon as he was back home. Mr Bankatlal just told that the one who was wearing the yellow saree won the contest. When Mrs Bankatlal pressed for further details, he elaborated as follows: 1. All of them were sitting in a row. 2. All of them wore sarees of different colours, viz. green, yellow, white, red. 3. There was only one runner-up and she was sitting beside Ms. Maharashtra. 4 .The runner-up was wearing the green saree. 5. Ms West Bengal was not sitting at the ends and was not the runner up. 6 .The winner and the runner-up are not sitting adjacent to each other. 7 .Ms Maharashtra was wearing white saree. 8 .Ms Andhra Pradesh was not wearing the green saree. 9 .Participants wearing yellow saree and white saree were at the ends. Question 3: Which saree was worn by Ms Andhra Pradesh?
Answer
  • yellow
  • red
  • green
  • white

Question 12

Question
Q9 continues Mr Bankatlal acted as a judge for the beauty contest. There were four participants, viz. Ms Andhra Pradesh, Ms Uttar Pradesh, Ms West Bengal and Ms Maharashtra. Mrs Bankatlal, who was very anxious about the result, asked him about it as soon as he was back home. Mr Bankatlal just told that the one who was wearing the yellow saree won the contest. When Mrs Bankatlal pressed for further details, he elaborated as follows: 1. All of them were sitting in a row. 2. All of them wore sarees of different colours, viz. green, yellow, white, red. 3. There was only one runner-up and she was sitting beside Ms. Maharashtra. 4 .The runner-up was wearing the green saree. 5. Ms West Bengal was not sitting at the ends and was not the runner up. 6 .The winner and the runner-up are not sitting adjacent to each other. 7 .Ms Maharashtra was wearing white saree. 8 .Ms Andhra Pradesh was not wearing the green saree. 9 .Participants wearing yellow saree and white saree were at the ends. Question 4: Who was the runner-up?
Answer
  • Ms Andhra Pradesh
  • Ms West Bengal
  • Ms Uttar Pradesh
  • Ms Maharashtra

Question 13

Question
Data Interpretation Answer the questions based on the following information. Mulayam Software Co., before selling a package to its clients (refer thegiven scheule) Question 1: Due to overrun in ‘design’, the design stage took 3 months, i.e. months 3, 4 and 5. The number of people working on design in the fifth month was 5. Calculate the percentage change in the cost incurred in the fifth month. (Due to improvement in ‘coding’ technique, this stage was completed in months 6-8 only.)
Answer
  • 225%
  • 150%
  • 275%
  • 240%

Question 14

Question
Question 2: With reference to the above question, what is the cost incurred in the new ‘coding’ stage? (Under the new technique, 4 people work in the sixth month and 5 in the eighth.)
Answer
  • Rs. 1,40,000
  • Rs. 1,50,000
  • Rs. 1,60,000
  • Rs. 1,70,000

Question 15

Question
Question 3: What is the difference in cost between the old and the new techniques?
Answer
  • Rs. 30,000
  • Rs. 60,000
  • Rs. 70,000
  • Rs. 40,000

Question 16

Question
Question 4: Under the new technique, which stage of software development is most expensive for Mulayam Software Co.?
Answer
  • Testing
  • Specification
  • Coding
  • Design

Question 17

Question
Question 5: Which five consecutive months have the lowest average cost per man-month under the new technique?
Answer
  • 1-5
  • 9-13
  • 11-15
  • None of these

Question 18

Question
how many numbers of zeros in following expression? 2^11 x 125^3 x 7^11+ 3 ^12 x 7^11×2^10×5^1 + 11^12 x 2^13 x 5^5^5
Answer
  • 3
  • 5
  • 1
  • 10

Question 19

Question
PROGRESSION Sum of first 12 terms of a GP is equal to the sum of the first 14 terms in the same GP. Sum of the first 17 terms is 92, what is the third term in the GP?
Answer
  • 92
  • -92
  • 46
  • 231

Question 20

Question
Read this passage and answer the questions that follow. There are two theories that have often been used to explain ancient and modern tragedy. Neither quite explains the complexity of the tragic process or the tragic hero, but each explains important elements of tragedy, and, because their conclusions are contradictory, they represent extreme views. and of the limitation of human effort. But this theory of tragedy is an oversimplification, primarily because it confuses the tragic condition with the tragic process: the theory does not acknowledge that fate, in a tragedy, normally becomes external to the hero only after the tragic process has as a heroism that creates the splendor and exhilaration that is unique to tragedy. The tragic hero quality of an honest person, but the external antagonist of the criminal. Secondarily, this theory of tragedy does not distinguish tragedy from irony. Irony does not need an exceptional central figure: the original destiny never quite fades out of the tragedy. as a rule, the more ignoble the hero the sharper the irony, when irony alone is the objective. It is heroism that creates the splendor and exhilaration that is unique to tragedy. The tragic hero normally has an extraordinary, often a nearly divine, destiny almost within grasp, and the glory of the original destiny never quite fades out of the tragedy. The second theory of tragedy states that the act that sets the tragic process in motion must be primarily a violation of normal law, whether human or divine; in short, that the tragic hero must have a flaw that has an essential connection with sin. Again it is true that the great majority of tragic heroes do possess hubris, or a proud and passionate mind that seems to make the hero’s downfall morally explicable. But such hubris is only the precipitating agent of catastrophe, just as in comedy the cause )f the happy ending is usually some act of humility often performed by a noble character who is meanly disguised. This theory of tragedy as morally explicable runs into the question of whether an innocent sufferer in a tragedy, such as Iphigenia, or Socrates in Plato Apology, is a tragic figure. They are, of course, even though it is not very easy to find crucial moral flaws in them. Cordelia shows sincerity and high spirit in refusing to flatter her faber, and Cordelia is 30 hanged. Tragedy, in short, is ambiguous and cannot be reduced to the opposition between human effort. and external fate, just as it cannot be reduced to the opposition between good and evil. question 1 : The primary purpose of the passage is. to
Answer
  • compare and criticize two theories of tragedy.
  • develop a new theory of tragedy.
  • summarize the thematic content of tragedy.
  • reject one theory of tragedy and offer another theory in its place.
  • distinguish between tragedy and iron

Question 21

Question
Q20 continues There are two theories that have often been used to explain ancient and modern tragedy. Neither quite explains the complexity of the tragic process or the tragic hero, but each explains important elements of tragedy, and, because their conclusions are contradictory, they represent extreme views. and of the limitation of human effort. But this theory of tragedy is an oversimplification, primarily because it confuses the tragic condition with the tragic process: the theory does not acknowledge that fate, in a tragedy, normally becomes external to the hero only after the tragic process has as a heroism that creates the splendor and exhilaration that is unique to tragedy. The tragic hero quality of an honest person, but the external antagonist of the criminal. Secondarily, this theory of tragedy does not distinguish tragedy from irony. Irony does not need an exceptional central figure: the original destiny never quite fades out of the tragedy. as a rule, the more ignoble the hero the sharper the irony, when irony alone is the objective. It is heroism that creates the splendor and exhilaration that is unique to tragedy. The tragic hero normally has an extraordinary, often a nearly divine, destiny almost within grasp, and the glory of the original destiny never quite fades out of the tragedy. The second theory of tragedy states that the act that sets the tragic process in motion must be primarily a violation of normal law, whether human or divine; in short, that the tragic hero must have a flaw that has an essential connection with sin. Again it is true that the great majority of tragic heroes do possess hubris, or a proud and passionate mind that seems to make the hero’s downfall morally explicable. But such hubris is only the precipitating agent of catastrophe, just as in comedy the cause )f the happy ending is usually some act of humility often performed by a noble character who is meanly disguised. This theory of tragedy as morally explicable runs into the question of whether an innocent sufferer in a tragedy, such as Iphigenia, or Socrates in Plato Apology, is a tragic figure. They are, of course, even though it is not very easy to find crucial moral flaws in them. Cordelia shows sincerity and high spirit in refusing to flatter her faber, and Cordelia is 30 hanged. Tragedy, in short, is ambiguous and cannot be reduced to the opposition between human effort. and external fate, just as it cannot be reduced to the opposition between good and evil. question 2 :The author states that the theories discussed in the passage “represent extreme views” because their conclusions are
Answer
  • unpopular
  • complex
  • paradoxical
  • contradictory
  • imaginative

Question 22

Question
There are two theories that have often been used to explain ancient and modern tragedy. Neither quite explains the complexity of the tragic process or the tragic hero, but each explains important elements of tragedy, and, because their conclusions are contradictory, they represent extreme views. and of the limitation of human effort. But this theory of tragedy is an oversimplification, primarily because it confuses the tragic condition with the tragic process: the theory does not acknowledge that fate, in a tragedy, normally becomes external to the hero only after the tragic process has as a heroism that creates the splendor and exhilaration that is unique to tragedy. The tragic hero quality of an honest person, but the external antagonist of the criminal. Secondarily, this theory of tragedy does not distinguish tragedy from irony. Irony does not need an exceptional central figure: the original destiny never quite fades out of the tragedy. as a rule, the more ignoble the hero the sharper the irony, when irony alone is the objective. It is heroism that creates the splendor and exhilaration that is unique to tragedy. The tragic hero normally has an extraordinary, often a nearly divine, destiny almost within grasp, and the glory of the original destiny never quite fades out of the tragedy. The second theory of tragedy states that the act that sets the tragic process in motion must be primarily a violation of normal law, whether human or divine; in short, that the tragic hero must have a flaw that has an essential connection with sin. Again it is true that the great majority of tragic heroes do possess hubris, or a proud and passionate mind that seems to make the hero’s downfall morally explicable. But such hubris is only the precipitating agent of catastrophe, just as in comedy the cause )f the happy ending is usually some act of humility often performed by a noble character who is meanly disguised. This theory of tragedy as morally explicable runs into the question of whether an innocent sufferer in a tragedy, such as Iphigenia, or Socrates in Plato Apology, is a tragic figure. They are, of course, even though it is not very easy to find crucial moral flaws in them. Cordelia shows sincerity and high spirit in refusing to flatter her faber, and Cordelia is 30 hanged. Tragedy, in short, is ambiguous and cannot be reduced to the opposition between human effort. and external fate, just as it cannot be reduced to the opposition between good and evil. question 3 : Which of the following comparisons of the tragic with the ironic hero is best supported by information contained in the’ passage?
Answer
  • A tragic hero’s fate is an external condition, but an ironic hero’s fate is an internal one.
  • A tragic hero must be controlled by fate, but an ironic hero cannot be.
  • A tragic hero’s moral flaw surprises the, audience, but an ironic hero’s sin does not.
  • A tragic hero and an ironic hero cannot both be virtuous figures in the same tragedy.
  • A tragic hero is usually extraordinary, but an ironic hero may be cowardly or even villainous.

Question 23

Question
Q20 continues There are two theories that have often been used to explain ancient and modern tragedy. Neither quite explains the complexity of the tragic process or the tragic hero, but each explains important elements of tragedy, and, because their conclusions are contradictory, they represent extreme views. and of the limitation of human effort. But this theory of tragedy is an oversimplification, primarily because it confuses the tragic condition with the tragic process: the theory does not acknowledge that fate, in a tragedy, normally becomes external to the hero only after the tragic process has as a heroism that creates the splendor and exhilaration that is unique to tragedy. The tragic hero quality of an honest person, but the external antagonist of the criminal. Secondarily, this theory of tragedy does not distinguish tragedy from irony. Irony does not need an exceptional central figure: the original destiny never quite fades out of the tragedy. as a rule, the more ignoble the hero the sharper the irony, when irony alone is the objective. It is heroism that creates the splendor and exhilaration that is unique to tragedy. The tragic hero normally has an extraordinary, often a nearly divine, destiny almost within grasp, and the glory of the original destiny never quite fades out of the tragedy. The second theory of tragedy states that the act that sets the tragic process in motion must be primarily a violation of normal law, whether human or divine; in short, that the tragic hero must have a flaw that has an essential connection with sin. Again it is true that the great majority of tragic heroes do possess hubris, or a proud and passionate mind that seems to make the hero’s downfall morally explicable. But such hubris is only the precipitating agent of catastrophe, just as in comedy the cause )f the happy ending is usually some act of humility often performed by a noble character who is meanly disguised. This theory of tragedy as morally explicable runs into the question of whether an innocent sufferer in a tragedy, such as Iphigenia, or Socrates in Plato Apology, is a tragic figure. They are, of course, even though it is not very easy to find crucial moral flaws in them. Cordelia shows sincerity and high spirit in refusing to flatter her faber, and Cordelia is 30 hanged. Tragedy, in short, is ambiguous and cannot be reduced to the opposition between human effort. and external fate, just as it cannot be reduced to the opposition between good and evil. question 4. The author contrasts an honest person and a criminal primarily in order to
Answer
  • prove that fate cannot be external to the tragic hero.
  • establish a criterion that allows a distinction to be made between irony and tragedy.
  • develop the distinction between the tragic condition and the tragic process.
  • introduce the concept of sin as the cause of tragic action.
  • argue that the theme of omnipotent external fate is shared by comedy and tragedy.

Question 24

Question
Q20 continues There are two theories that have often been used to explain ancient and modern tragedy. Neither quite explains the complexity of the tragic process or the tragic hero, but each explains important elements of tragedy, and, because their conclusions are contradictory, they represent extreme views. and of the limitation of human effort. But this theory of tragedy is an oversimplification, primarily because it confuses the tragic condition with the tragic process: the theory does not acknowledge that fate, in a tragedy, normally becomes external to the hero only after the tragic process has as a heroism that creates the splendor and exhilaration that is unique to tragedy. The tragic hero quality of an honest person, but the external antagonist of the criminal. Secondarily, this theory of tragedy does not distinguish tragedy from irony. Irony does not need an exceptional central figure: the original destiny never quite fades out of the tragedy. as a rule, the more ignoble the hero the sharper the irony, when irony alone is the objective. It is heroism that creates the splendor and exhilaration that is unique to tragedy. The tragic hero normally has an extraordinary, often a nearly divine, destiny almost within grasp, and the glory of the original destiny never quite fades out of the tragedy. The second theory of tragedy states that the act that sets the tragic process in motion must be primarily a violation of normal law, whether human or divine; in short, that the tragic hero must have a flaw that has an essential connection with sin. Again it is true that the great majority of tragic heroes do possess hubris, or a proud and passionate mind that seems to make the hero’s downfall morally explicable. But such hubris is only the precipitating agent of catastrophe, just as in comedy the cause )f the happy ending is usually some act of humility often performed by a noble character who is meanly disguised. This theory of tragedy as morally explicable runs into the question of whether an innocent sufferer in a tragedy, such as Iphigenia, or Socrates in Plato Apology, is a tragic figure. They are, of course, even though it is not very easy to find crucial moral flaws in them. Cordelia shows sincerity and high spirit in refusing to flatter her faber, and Cordelia is 30 hanged. Tragedy, in short, is ambiguous and cannot be reduced to the opposition between human effort. and external fate, just as it cannot be reduced to the opposition between good and evil. question 5. According to the. author, Cordellia is an example of a figure who
Answer
  • transcended both the laws of ‘fate and the laws of society.
  • sinned, but whose sin did not set the tragic process in motion.
  • disobeyed a moral law, but was not punished for doing so.
  • submitted willingly to fate, even though her submission caused her death.
  • did not set the tragic process in motion, but is still a tragic figure.

Question 25

Question
Q20 continues There are two theories that have often been used to explain ancient and modern tragedy. Neither quite explains the complexity of the tragic process or the tragic hero, but each explains important elements of tragedy, and, because their conclusions are contradictory, they represent extreme views. and of the limitation of human effort. But this theory of tragedy is an oversimplification, primarily because it confuses the tragic condition with the tragic process: the theory does not acknowledge that fate, in a tragedy, normally becomes external to the hero only after the tragic process has as a heroism that creates the splendor and exhilaration that is unique to tragedy. The tragic hero quality of an honest person, but the external antagonist of the criminal. Secondarily, this theory of tragedy does not distinguish tragedy from irony. Irony does not need an exceptional central figure: the original destiny never quite fades out of the tragedy. as a rule, the more ignoble the hero the sharper the irony, when irony alone is the objective. It is heroism that creates the splendor and exhilaration that is unique to tragedy. The tragic hero normally has an extraordinary, often a nearly divine, destiny almost within grasp, and the glory of the original destiny never quite fades out of the tragedy. The second theory of tragedy states that the act that sets the tragic process in motion must be primarily a violation of normal law, whether human or divine; in short, that the tragic hero must have a flaw that has an essential connection with sin. Again it is true that the great majority of tragic heroes do possess hubris, or a proud and passionate mind that seems to make the hero’s downfall morally explicable. But such hubris is only the precipitating agent of catastrophe, just as in comedy the cause )f the happy ending is usually some act of humility often performed by a noble character who is meanly disguised. This theory of tragedy as morally explicable runs into the question of whether an innocent sufferer in a tragedy, such as Iphigenia, or Socrates in Plato Apology, is a tragic figure. They are, of course, even though it is not very easy to find crucial moral flaws in them. Cordelia shows sincerity and high spirit in refusing to flatter her faber, and Cordelia is 30 hanged. Tragedy, in short, is ambiguous and cannot be reduced to the opposition between human effort. and external fate, just as it cannot be reduced to the opposition between good and evil. question 6. In the author’s opinion, an act of humility in comedy is most analogous to
Answer
  • a catastrophe in tragedy.
  • an ironic action in tragedy.
  • a tragic hero’s pride and passion
  • a tragic hero’s aversion to sin.
  • a tragic hero’s pursuit of an unusual destiny.
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