Random Vocabulary bis

Manuel Lujan
Quiz by Manuel Lujan, updated more than 1 year ago
Manuel Lujan
Created by Manuel Lujan about 6 years ago
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Description

Vocabulary

Resource summary

Question 1

Question
I wanted to do more than [blank_start]bring in[blank_end] (be the reason that someone receives an amount of money) [blank_start]revenue[blank_end] (income from business activities or taxes).
Answer
  • bring in
  • revenue

Question 2

Question
In 1993, Phillips [blank_start]stepped off[blank_end] (gave up) the partnership track.
Answer
  • stepped off

Question 3

Question
It took Galston six months to [blank_start]work up the nerve[blank_end] (muster courage) to walk into the Oval Office, meet with the president, and walk away from his job.
Answer
  • work up the nerve

Question 4

Question
Phillips, Casy and Galston had to [blank_start]reckon with[blank_end] (consider or anticipate) the [blank_start]fallout[blank_end] (unpleasant effects) from success.
Answer
  • reckon with
  • fallout

Question 5

Question
"What do I love to do?"; "How am I comfortable behaving?"; "What can I achieve?" If you [blank_start]untangle[blank_end] (to solve a complicated situation or problem) those questions, and compare the answers with your natural talents and abilities, you'll start down the [blank_start]path[blank_end] to success.
Answer
  • untangle
  • path

Question 6

Question
Amith had led an [blank_start]accomplished[blank_end] (very skilfully done) and [blank_start]wide-ranging[blank_end] (dealing with a large variety of subjects) career.
Answer
  • accomplished
  • wide-ranging

Question 7

Question
"My throat feels [blank_start]constricted[blank_end]" (narrowed), she complains.
Answer
  • constricted

Question 8

Question
Daniel Alkon, author of Memory's Voice, [blank_start]likens[blank_end] (compares, show similarities) the process [blank_start]to[blank_end] a tape recording.
Answer
  • likens
  • to

Question 9

Question
We also must be psychologically ready to [blank_start]encounter[blank_end] (deal with) memories that are recalled.
Answer
  • encounter

Question 10

Question
[blank_start]Half-baked[blank_end] (not practical for not being wholly prepared) [blank_start]pop[blank_end] (for many people but without knowledge) psychologists with the barest knowledge of transference and counter-transference don't realise that it can be damaging to get clients to cry or scream on the table.
Answer
  • Half-baked
  • pop

Question 11

Question
She took up karate, which allowed her to apply her new sense of [blank_start]groundedness[blank_end] (condition of being sensible and confident) and power. What had been a [blank_start]meek[blank_end] (humble and submissive) personality in a soft body started developing into a confident individual in a strong body.
Answer
  • groundedness
  • meek

Question 12

Question
Her jaw [blank_start]quivers[blank_end] (shakes). She whimpers.
Answer
  • quivers

Question 13

Question
Marcie later [blank_start]recalled[blank_end] (remembered) the images she saw. "My mother was [blank_start]yanking[blank_end] (pulling) me around the room by my hair. She was so angry, so hostile..."
Answer
  • recalled
  • yanking

Question 14

Question
What is this [blank_start]phenomenon[blank_end] (event, fact) called "body memory", and what [blank_start]triggers[blank_end] (activates) its [blank_start]recall[blank_end] (recollection)? Of what value is it to a person's [blank_start]well-being[blank_end] (health, welfare)? Are there possible dangers in [blank_start]eliciting[blank_end] (calling forth) it?
Answer
  • phenomenon
  • triggers
  • recall
  • well-being
  • eliciting

Question 15

Question
In a situation where we feel it's not permissible to show certain feelings, we unconsciously [blank_start]clench[blank_end] (tighten, contract) the muscles that normally would be used in expressing those emotions.
Answer
  • clench

Question 16

Question
The body becomes "armored" -it [blank_start]locks in[blank_end] (shuts in, imprisons) the memories or emotions.
Answer
  • locks in

Question 17

Question
As in Marcie's case, holding patterns can be [blank_start]embedded[blank_end] (fixed) even before we're capable of mentally perceiving what is happening.
Answer
  • embedded

Question 18

Question
If you suspect that buried memories [blank_start]underlie[blank_end] (are the cause of) an [blank_start]ailment[blank_end] (illness, condition) and you are tempted to have a bodyworker help [blank_start]uproot[blank_end] (expel, eject) those memories, you should proceed with care.
Answer
  • underlie
  • ailment
  • uproot

Question 19

Question
Transference is a re-experiencing in a present relationship of certain feelings, thoughts, or fantasies that ocurred in a [blank_start]prior[blank_end] (earlier) relationship.
Answer
  • prior

Question 20

Question
She finds her work genuinely satisfying -even though she's not [blank_start]on track to[blank_end] (making progress and likely to achieve) make partner.
Answer
  • on track to

Question 21

Question
We could have grown it much bigger. But rather than grow the business, we [blank_start]shrank[blank_end] (made smaller) it back down to 2.
Answer
  • shrank

Question 22

Question
For four years, my days were broken into 15 of 20 minute segments. Each segment involved stress, fun, and sometimes both. The adrenaline was always [blank_start]pumping[blank_end] (flowing).
Answer
  • pumping

Question 23

Question
He built a [blank_start]thriving[blank_end] (very successful) firm.
Answer
  • thriving

Question 24

Question
He is, [blank_start]to put it mildly[blank_end] (not being as strong or extreme as it could be), a driven guy.
Answer
  • to put it mildly

Question 25

Question
There was a second problem I missed being able to [blank_start]call my own shots[blank_end] (be in charge, be in authority).
Answer
  • call my own shots

Question 26

Question
Say ([blank_start]conservatively[blank_end] (purposedly showing less amount or degree for the sake of caution)) that you work 40 hours a week, 50 weeks a year, for 50 years. That's 100,000 working hours over the course of a career.
Answer
  • conservatively

Question 27

Question
If you must use the Internet, [blank_start]encrypt[blank_end] (put into code) your -email and never give your real name when registering at websites.
Answer
  • encrypt

Question 28

Question
All this may sound paranoic, but in fact, it is advice being offered by the more [blank_start]zealous[blank_end] (marked by active interest and enthusiasm) of today's privacy campaigners.
Answer
  • zealous

Question 29

Question
In an increasingly wired world, people are continually creating information about themselves that is recorded and often sold or [blank_start]pooled[blank_end] (shared, gathered).
Answer
  • pooled

Question 30

Question
The goal of privacy [blank_start]advocates[blank_end] (supporters) is not extreme.
Answer
  • advocates

Question 31

Question
That is a clue to how fast things have changed. To try to restore the privacy that was universal in the 1970s is to [blank_start]chase a chimera[blank_end] (try to achieve something impossible).
Answer
  • chase a chimera

Question 32

Question
Attempts to [blank_start]restrain[blank_end] (control) the [blank_start]surveillance[blank_end] (close observation) society through new laws will intensify.
Answer
  • restrain
  • surveillance

Question 33

Question
Privacy protection services may offer a brief [blank_start]respite[blank_end] (reprieve, temporary relief) for those determined, whatever the trouble o cost, to protect themselves.
Answer
  • respite

Question 34

Question
20 years [blank_start]hence[blank_end] (from now) most people will find that the privacy they take for granted today will be just as [blank_start]elusive[blank_end] (impossible to catch or achieve) as the privacy of the 1970 now seems.
Answer
  • hence
  • elusive

Question 35

Question
Privacy is doomed for the same reason that is has been [blank_start]eroded[blank_end] (deteriorated) so fast over the past two decades. People may prefer to [blank_start]forsake[blank_end] (abandon) the huge benefits that the new information economy promises. But they will not, in practice, be offered that choice.
Answer
  • eroded
  • forsake

Question 36

Question
Privacy is a [blank_start]residual[blank_end] (remaining after the rest has gone) value, hard to define or protect in the abstract. The [blank_start]cumulative[blank_end] (increasing by addition) effect of these [blank_start]bargains[blank_end] (agreements between parties fixing obligations to both of them) will be the end of privacy.
Answer
  • residual
  • cumulative
  • bargains

Question 37

Question
Someone who is an expert in a subject, and is often asked to talk to the public about that subject is a [blank_start]pundit[blank_end].
Answer
  • pundit

Question 38

Question
Someone who uses money to start businesses and make business deals, usually with considerable daring, skill, and financial risk is an [blank_start]entrepreneur[blank_end].
Answer
  • entrepreneur

Question 39

Question
To do what most other people do is to [blank_start]follow the herd[blank_end].
Answer
  • follow the herd

Question 40

Question
I [blank_start]stopped short[blank_end] (come to a sudden and unexpected stop) of telling him what I really thought.
Answer
  • stopped short

Question 41

Question
I have respect for everyone who has [blank_start]had the guts to[blank_end] (been brave enough to) travel here to work despite the adversity.
Answer
  • had the guts to

Question 42

Question
They see too that [blank_start]blue-chip[blank_end] (making profit) companies are returning bumper profits.
Answer
  • blue-chip

Question 43

Question
To be like a [blank_start]pawn[blank_end] in somebody else's [blank_start]game[blank_end] is to be manipulated by someone.
Answer
  • pawn
  • game

Question 44

Question
She [blank_start]lodged[blank_end] (posed, presented [something such as a complaint]) a complaint with the city council.
Answer
  • lodged

Question 45

Question
She did not [blank_start]endorse[blank_end] (express approval) federal legalization of the drug for either medical or recreational use.
Answer
  • endorse

Question 46

Question
She was mildly [blank_start]duplicitous[blank_end] (dishonest, hypocritical), encouraging a doomed project perhaps without telling its makers it was doomed, gossipy about salaries and billing.
Answer
  • duplicitous

Question 47

Question
[blank_start]Restrain[blank_end] can also mean to restrict or hold back someone else, to prevent someone from doing what they're intending to do. Prison guards have to [blank_start]restrain[blank_end] a prisoner who is trying to attack one of his fellow inmates. That prisoner might even be put in handcuffs — a kind of [blank_start]restraint[blank_end]. You can [blank_start]restrain[blank_end] yourself, for example if you're watching a Broadway show and suddenly feel the urge to sing along. Your fellow audience members would be grateful for your [blank_start]restraint[blank_end], especially if you've got a terrible voice.
Answer
  • Restrain
  • restrain
  • restraint
  • restrain
  • restraint

Question 48

Question
Although the violence has [blank_start]subsided[blank_end] (weakened) considerably from its peak in 2011, human rights organisations still accuse the Bahraini authorities of abuses.
Answer
  • subsided

Question 49

Question
Stories about science and religion [blank_start]elicit[blank_end] (call forth) plenty of comments, especially our stories about how religion is being forced upon students in public schools.
Answer
  • elicit

Question 50

Question
Still, he says that he [blank_start]relished[blank_end] (enjoyed) the chance to play someone different.
Answer
  • relished

Question 51

Question
When a fee is charged for the privilege of driving on a road or crossing a bridge, it's called a [blank_start]toll[blank_end]. Another kind of [blank_start]toll[blank_end] is the charge to make a long distance telephone call. Occasionally, [blank_start]toll[blank_end] refers to a different kind of cost — a loss of human life: the human [blank_start]toll[blank_end] of an earthquake or war. Finally, there's the [blank_start]toll[blank_end], or deep ringing sound, of a bell.
Answer
  • toll
  • toll
  • toll
  • toll
  • toll

Question 52

Question
To [blank_start]hold up[blank_end] one's [blank_start]end[blank_end] is to carry one's share of the burden; to do one's share of the work..
Answer
  • hold up
  • end

Question 53

Question
However distasteful Putin’s actions may be, the West should recognize the spiritual yearning that [blank_start]underlies[blank_end] (is the cause of) his power — the soft side of hard.
Answer
  • underlies

Question 54

Question
Their price would have to [blank_start]shrink[blank_end] (decrease) by more than half, to roughly $5,000 per patient per year, to make the $150,000 level.
Answer
  • shrink

Question 55

Question
A comment or behaviour is [blank_start]out of line[blank_end] when it's in a way other people do not approve.
Answer
  • out of line

Question 56

Question
To help (a child, an animal, a plant, etc.) to grow or develop is to [blank_start]nurture[blank_end].
Answer
  • nurture

Question 57

Question
To be in a difficult situation in which a very small mistake could have very bad results is to [blank_start]walk a tightrope[blank_end].
Answer
  • walk a tightrope

Question 58

Question
To be [blank_start]glum[blank_end] is to be sad and in low spirits.
Answer
  • glum

Question 59

Question
[blank_start]Roughly[blank_end] is a synonym of approximately.
Answer
  • Roughly

Question 60

Question
The action, state or effect of improving or becoming less severe is "[blank_start]amelioration[blank_end]".
Answer
  • amelioration

Question 61

Question
If you do something [blank_start]in the heat of the moment[blank_end], you do it at a time when you are too angry or excited to think carefully.
Answer
  • in the heat of the moment

Question 62

Question
To [blank_start]do the trick[blank_end] is to work, to do what is needed in order to achieve something.
Answer
  • do the trick

Question 63

Question
To [blank_start]contend[blank_end] something is to claim that it is true.
Answer
  • contend

Question 64

Question
To begin to understand a difficult situation and start to find a way of dealing with it is to [blank_start]get a grip on[blank_end] it.
Answer
  • get a grip on
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