B7 Quiz - The Skeleton, Movement and Exercise

Leah Firmstone
Quiz by Leah Firmstone, updated more than 1 year ago
Leah Firmstone
Created by Leah Firmstone about 4 years ago
305
18

Description

GCSE Biology (B7 - Further Biology) Quiz on B7 Quiz - The Skeleton, Movement and Exercise, created by Leah Firmstone on 01/14/2016.

Resource summary

Question 1

Question
Label the skeleton with the correct bones.
Answer
  • Cranium
  • Rib
  • Vertebrae
  • Ulna
  • Radius
  • Pelvis
  • Femur
  • Patella
  • Tibia
  • Fibula

Question 2

Question
What are the functions of our skeleton?
Answer
  • Protection of organs
  • Production of blood
  • Movement
  • Transportation of blood
  • Regulation of body reactions

Question 3

Question
Haematopoiesis is the name given to the production of blood cells.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 4

Question
The skeleton is made up of bone [blank_start]tissues[blank_end] and cartilage - these consist of [blank_start]living[blank_end] cells. [blank_start]Blood[blank_end] brings nutrients and oxygen to these cells like any other. Bone is continually [blank_start]broken down[blank_end] and rebuilt. [blank_start]Weight[blank_end]-bearing exercises [blank_start]stimulate[blank_end] bone growth, whilst inactivity makes [blank_start]bone[blank_end] weak and less [blank_start]dense[blank_end].
Answer
  • tissues
  • living
  • Blood
  • broken down
  • Weight
  • stimulate
  • bone
  • dense

Question 5

Question
Bone is tissue that can contract and relax to cause movement.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 6

Question
Ligaments are...
Answer
  • strong, fibrous, elastic connective tissues that connect bones to each other in a joint.
  • strong, fibrous, flexible connective tissue that joins muscles to bone.

Question 7

Question
When muscles contract, they get [blank_start]shorter[blank_end]. Muscles are attached to bones by [blank_start]tendons[blank_end], so when the muscle contracts, it [blank_start]pulls[blank_end] on the bone and so enabling movement [blank_start]of[blank_end] the bone is part of a joint. Muscles can only cause bones to move by [blank_start]contracting[blank_end]. This means that a muscle can only move a bone in one [blank_start]direction[blank_end] so muscles work in [blank_start]antagonistic[blank_end] pairs - one muscle contracts while the other [blank_start]relaxes[blank_end]. To move in the [blank_start]opposite[blank_end] way, the relaxed muscle contracts while the contracted muscle relaxes.
Answer
  • shorter
  • tendons
  • pulls
  • if
  • contracting
  • direction
  • antagonistic
  • relaxes
  • opposite

Question 8

Question
Label the diagram of a joint, and match the part of the joint to its definition.
Answer
  • Cartilage
  • Synovial Fluid (diagram)
  • Synovial Fluid
  • Tendons
  • Tendon
  • Ligament

Question 9

Question
What is arthritis?
Answer
  • When core body temperature falls too low.
  • When cartilage wears down at the ends of bones in a joint grind together when it is moved.
  • A separation of two bones where they meet at a joint.

Question 10

Question
Which joints only allow backwards and forwards movement?
Answer
  • Hinge joints
  • Ball and socket joints
  • Fixed joints
  • Pivot joints

Question 11

Question
What type of joint allows bones to rotate around each other by 360 degrees?
Answer
  • Ball and socket joint
  • Pivot joint
  • Hinge joint
  • Fixed joint

Question 12

Question
A fixed joint is held together by rough fibres, and they are several bones fused together to form a rigid structure.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 13

Question
Before starting a new exercise programme, it is important to find out the following things: Current symptoms - eg pain in left knee may indicate an existing [blank_start]injury[blank_end]. Current medication - eg using an inhaler for asthma may suggest that gentle [blank_start]exercise[blank_end] will be better than strenuous exercise. Alcohol and tobacco consumption - which may affect the cardiovascular and respiratory [blank_start]systems[blank_end]. Level of current physical [blank_start]activity[blank_end] - to prevent over-exertion which may cause injury. Family [blank_start]medical[blank_end] history - eg if a close family member died of a heart attack then care should be taken before strenuous exercise is recommended. Previous treatments - eg surgery after a dislocated shoulder may [blank_start]limit[blank_end] the range of movement. All treatments and exercise programmes carry some [blank_start]risk[blank_end]. For example, lifting weights in the gym can damage your back and doing a lot of running can damage your knees and other [blank_start]joints[blank_end]. It is up to the individual and the healthcare professional to [blank_start]balance[blank_end] these risks against the benefits of the treatment or exercise programme and decide what to do.
Answer
  • injury
  • exercise
  • systems
  • activity
  • medical
  • limit
  • risk
  • joints
  • balance

Question 14

Question
BMI = weight (kg) / [height (m)]^2 BMI can be use to tell you the proportion of your weight and height, and to categorise people.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 15

Question
In order to know whether a new [blank_start]training[blank_end] programme has made a positive impact on fitness, it is important to [blank_start]record[blank_end] measurements regularly. These measurements could include: the type and duration of exercise done on different days over a [blank_start]period[blank_end] of time a food [blank_start]diary[blank_end] so that nutrition can also be evaluated [blank_start]resting[blank_end] heart rate blood [blank_start]pressure[blank_end] breathing [blank_start]rate[blank_end] duration of [blank_start]recovery[blank_end] period after completing a particular exercise or workout BMI [blank_start]percentage[blank_end] body fat weight [blank_start]lost[blank_end] or gained Recording more than one type of measurement is important because some measurements of fitness may show an [blank_start]improvement[blank_end], but others may not. It is important to consider the [blank_start]accuracy[blank_end] of each type of measurement of fitness, and whether it can be repeated under the same [blank_start]conditions[blank_end], in order to evaluate its reliability. For example, if blood pressure was being monitored a [blank_start]misleading[blank_end] figure could be attained. Values should be obtained using a [blank_start]specific[blank_end] method - such as sitting down with the arm at chest height - to ensure repeatability was accurate. If this method was not followed then the result would not be [blank_start]reliable[blank_end]. Values could also be altered if the person was stressed. Another example would be monitoring your BMI. This value could vary on an [blank_start]hourly[blank_end] basis depending on your food and fluid intake. To ensure accuracy, the reading should be taken at the same [blank_start]time[blank_end] of day to make results usefully comparable.
Answer
  • training
  • record
  • period
  • diary
  • resting
  • pressure
  • rate
  • recovery
  • percentage
  • lost
  • improvement
  • accuracy
  • conditions
  • misleading
  • specific
  • reliable
  • hourly
  • time

Question 16

Question
Which of the following are common sporting injuries?
Answer
  • Ankle sprain
  • Damage to ligaments inc. torn ligaments
  • Torn tendons
  • Dislocations
  • Concussions
  • Infections
  • Burns

Question 17

Question
The acronym for treatments for minor sporting injuries is RIDE.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 18

Question
A physiotherapist is a [blank_start]healthcare[blank_end] professional who [blank_start]specialises[blank_end] in treating people who have skeletal-[blank_start]muscular[blank_end] injuries. Physiotherapists work out programmes of movements and [blank_start]exercises[blank_end] for patients to follow in order to increase their [blank_start]range[blank_end] of movement, [blank_start]flexibility[blank_end] and strength after an injury.
Answer
  • flexibility
  • specialises
  • healthcare
  • muscular
  • exercises
  • range

Question 19

Question
Heart rate is measured in beats per [blank_start]minute[blank_end]. Generally speaking, the lower someone’s resting [blank_start]heart[blank_end] rate, the fitter they are. A teenager or adult has a [blank_start]typical[blank_end] resting heart rate of 60-80 beats per minute. Heart rate [blank_start]increases[blank_end] during exercise to transport oxygen and glucose to the muscles and to remove [blank_start]waste[blank_end] products. After exercise, the heart rate begins to return to [blank_start]normal[blank_end] and this is called the recovery period. The [blank_start]shorter[blank_end] the recovery period, the fitter the individual.
Answer
  • minute
  • heart
  • typical
  • increases
  • waste
  • normal
  • shorter

Question 20

Question
The heart does not return to its normal rate immediately to ensure that all the carbon dioxide that has built up around the muscle cells is removed.
Answer
  • True
  • False
Show full summary Hide full summary

Similar

GCSE Biology B2 (OCR)
Usman Rauf
B7.1-3 - Peak Performance
franimal
Biology- Genes and Variation
Laura Perry
Biology Revision - Y10 Mock
Tom Mitchell
F211- Module 1 Cells, exchange and transport
eilish.waite
B7.5 - New technologies
franimal
Cell Structure
megan.radcliffe16
Biology- Genes, Chromosomes and DNA
Laura Perry
Biology B1.3
raffia.khalid99
P.7.1-4 - Studying the Universe
franimal
C7 Quiz - Energetics
Leah Firmstone