Approaches Quiz- Psychology (A2)

Grace Fawcitt
Quiz by , created over 2 years ago

AQA Psychology Psychopathology quiz for A2/A Level. For approaches such as behaviourism, cognitive approach, SLT and biological approach from AS, see the 'Approaches Quiz- Psychology (AS)' Covers all new topics in the AQA Psychology textbook, including researchers, evaluations and theories. Made for my own benefit, so not all questions will help you out, but feel free to use. Click 'Review All Answers' at the end to see explanations and expansions of answers.

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Grace Fawcitt
Created by Grace Fawcitt over 2 years ago
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Question 1

Question
Which researcher investigated the psychodynamic approach?
Answer
  • Freud
  • Rogers
  • Baddeley
  • Skinner
  • Pavlov

Question 2

Question
Label the image below of an iceberg with the correct terms for Freud's iceberg analogy
Answer
  • Conscious
  • Unconscious
  • Preconscious
  • Subconscious
  • Conscience
  • Unconscience
  • Preconscious
  • Subconscious
  • Unconscious
  • Conscience
  • Unconscience
  • Postconscious
  • Postconscious
  • Unconscious
  • Preconscious
  • Conscious
  • Subconscious
  • Conscience
  • Unconscience
  • Postconscious
  • Conscious

Question 3

Question
Conscious: the information we [blank_start]are aware of[blank_end] in the present moment Preconscious: thoughts and feelings which we may become aware of during dreams or [blank_start]Freudian slips[blank_end] (e.g. calling teacher 'mum' instead of 'miss') Unconscious: the [blank_start]majority[blank_end] of our mind. It stores all of our [blank_start]instinctive drives[blank_end] that have a significant effect on our behaviour and personality. It also represses [blank_start]traumatic[blank_end] memories (including, according to Freud, those experienced based on the Oedipus and Electra theory of childhood incestuous thoughts)
Answer
  • are aware of
  • are not aware of
  • repress
  • Freudian slips
  • Pavlovian slips
  • Freud's slippers
  • Skinner's slips
  • majority
  • minority
  • instinctive drives
  • current thoughts
  • conscious feelings
  • conscious drives
  • traumatic
  • happy
  • useful

Question 4

Question
Freud describes personality as a tripartite, meaning there are 3 parts: 1. The id: this part operates on our [blank_start]pleasure[blank_end] principle and is based on [blank_start]unconscious[blank_end] drives and instincts. It develops at [blank_start]childbirth[blank_end], and is characterised by a need for immediate gratification. 2. The ego: the ego mediates between the id and the superego. It operates on the [blank_start]reality[blank_end] principle and develops at around [blank_start]2 years old[blank_end]. The main way in which it reduces the conflict between the id and the superego is by using [blank_start]defence[blank_end] mechanisms. 3. The superego: this part operates on the [blank_start]morality[blank_end] principle and forms at about [blank_start]5 years old[blank_end]. It is our internalised sense of [blank_start]right and wrong[blank_end], and it punishes the ego for wrongdoing via guilt.
Answer
  • pleasure
  • reality
  • morality
  • surreality
  • obscurity
  • reality
  • surreality
  • obscurity
  • morality
  • pleasure
  • morality
  • reality
  • obscurity
  • surreality
  • pleasure
  • unconscious
  • conscious
  • childbirth
  • 2 years old
  • 5 years old
  • 2 weeks old
  • 2 years old
  • 5 years old
  • 16 years old
  • 2 weeks old
  • defence
  • offense
  • attack
  • 5 years old
  • 2 years old
  • 2 weeks old
  • 16 years old
  • right and wrong
  • respect
  • black and white

Question 5

Question
Fill in the blanks of the diagram of Freud's psychosexual stages, including the stage, age, description, and consequences of unresolved conflict
Answer
  • Oral
  • Anal
  • Phallic
  • Latent
  • Genital
  • 0-1
  • 1-3
  • 3-5
  • 5- puberty
  • puberty onwards
  • mouth
  • anus
  • genital area
  • N/A- repressed
  • Conscious sexual desires
  • smoking
  • sarcasm
  • perfectionist
  • thoughtless
  • narcissist
  • sometimes homosexual
  • heterosexual relationships
  • friendships

Question 6

Question
Defence mechanisms for the [blank_start]ego[blank_end] 1. Repression: forcing a [blank_start]traumatic[blank_end] memory out of the conscious mind 2. Denial: Refusing to acknowledge some aspect of [blank_start]reality[blank_end] 3. Displacement: Transferring feelings from the [blank_start]true[blank_end] source of a distressing emotion to [blank_start]a substitute[blank_end] object
Answer
  • ego
  • id
  • superego
  • traumatic
  • happy
  • childhood
  • funny
  • old
  • reality
  • death
  • abnormality
  • fantasy
  • true
  • false
  • a substitute
  • the same

Question 7

Question
Name two advantages of the psychodynamic approach
Answer
  • Good explanatory power
  • Easy to generalise (use of case studies)
  • Can be easily falsified
  • Practical application

Question 8

Question
Name four disadvantages of the psychodynamic approach
Answer
  • Lacks explanatory power
  • Unfalsifiable
  • The case studies were too subjective
  • The case studies were too objective
  • Psychoanalysis can be harmful
  • Too deterministic
  • Lacks determinism

Question 9

Question
The humanistic approach believe in [blank_start]subjectivity[blank_end] and [blank_start]self[blank_end]-determination. In essence, all humans are [blank_start]unique[blank_end], and should be treated as such; trying to fit people into categories is [blank_start]unnatural[blank_end]. This approach is therefore classed as a [blank_start]person[blank_end]-centred approach.
Answer
  • subjectivity
  • objectivity
  • self
  • social
  • group
  • psycho
  • unique
  • the same
  • unnatural
  • natural
  • person
  • group

Question 10

Question
Self-actualisation: the [blank_start]innate[blank_end] desire to grow [blank_start]psychologically[blank_end] and fulfil one's potential. This is classed as a '[blank_start]growth[blank_end] need' on Maslow's hierarchy of needs.
Answer
  • innate
  • acquired
  • psychologically
  • physiologically
  • growth
  • deficiency

Question 11

Question
Label Maslow's hierarchy of needs (see explanation for examples)
Answer
  • Physiological needs
  • Biological needs
  • Safety needs
  • Insecurity needs
  • Belonging/love needs
  • Hatred/passion needs
  • Esteem needs
  • Estimation needs
  • Self-actualisation
  • Self-realisation

Question 12

Question
In Maslow's hierarchy of needs, there are 4 [blank_start]deficiency[blank_end] needs (physiological, safety, belonging/love, esteem). In order to move up the hierarchy, you must [blank_start]satisfy[blank_end] each need. For example, you cannot satisfy the safety need if the physiological need isn't satisfied. There is also a [blank_start]growth[blank_end] need, self-actualisation, which is achieved when [blank_start]all[blank_end] needs are satisfied. People in extreme poverty and privation often can't satisfy their physiological needs, let alone self-actualise. This can lead to [blank_start]restlessness[blank_end] and [blank_start]dissatisfaction[blank_end].
Answer
  • deficiency
  • efficiency
  • growth
  • satisfy
  • dissatisfy
  • growth
  • strength
  • actual
  • all
  • 3
  • some
  • restlessness
  • restfulness
  • dissatisfaction
  • satisfaction

Question 13

Question
Characteristics of a self-actualised person 1. Good perception of [blank_start]reality[blank_end] 2. Can [blank_start]accept[blank_end] themselves and others as they are 3. [blank_start]Problem[blank_end]-centred, not ego-centred 4. [blank_start]Appreciative[blank_end] of life experiences 5. Have [blank_start]peak[blank_end] experiences 6. Maintain profound [blank_start]relationships[blank_end] 7. [blank_start]Creative[blank_end] 8. [blank_start]Independent[blank_end]
Answer
  • reality
  • abnormality
  • surreality
  • accept
  • reject
  • Problem
  • Self
  • Appreciative
  • Hateful
  • peak
  • depressing
  • relationships
  • rivalries
  • Creative
  • Unimaginative
  • Independent
  • Dependent

Question 14

Question
Which researcher investigated humanistic therapy?
Answer
  • Freud
  • Maslow
  • Rogers

Question 15

Question
Rogers claimed that, in order for a person to self-actualise, their view of themselves must be [blank_start]congruent[blank_end] to their ideal self (the person they want to be). If the gap between the self and the ideal self is too [blank_start]large[blank_end], [blank_start]incongruence[blank_end] occurs, and [blank_start]negative[blank_end] feelings of self-worth ensue. For example, if Person A's ideal self is a mechanic with 2 kids and a happy relationship with their partner while living in the UK, but their current self is unemployed with no kids or relationship and they live in Antarctica, incongruence would occur.
Answer
  • congruent
  • incongruent
  • different
  • large
  • small
  • incongruence
  • congruence
  • negative
  • positive

Question 16

Question
Rogers created [blank_start]client[blank_end]-centred therapy to [blank_start]reduce[blank_end] the gap between the self and the ideal self for clients. He found that many adult experiences, such as low self-esteem, are the result of early childhood experiences and a lack of [blank_start]unconditional[blank_end] love on their parents' part. Because of this, Rogers aimed to provide his clients with unconditional [blank_start]positive[blank_end] regard. This meant the atmosphere of the therapy was warm and [blank_start]non-judgemental[blank_end], and the client is encouraged to discover their own solutions.
Answer
  • client
  • group
  • self
  • ego
  • reduce
  • increase
  • unconditional
  • conditional
  • positive
  • negative
  • non-judgemental
  • judgemental
  • analytical

Question 17

Question
Name two advantages of the humanistic approach
Answer
  • Belief in holism increases validity
  • Positive approach
  • Good application to all cultures
  • Easy to test

Question 18

Question
Name three disadvantages of the humanistic approach
Answer
  • Untestable concepts
  • Cultural bias
  • Negative approach to humanity
  • Too reductionist
  • Limited application