11MAI Standard IB Memorise Me!

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Frances Hughes
Flashcards by Frances Hughes, updated more than 1 year ago
Frances Hughes
Created by Frances Hughes almost 5 years ago
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Question Answer
In arithmetic an sequence... the difference between one term and the next is a constant (d)
In a geometric sequence... ...each term is found by multiplying the previous term by a constant (r)
What is this formula for? What does each variable stand for? nth term of a geometric sequence u(1) is the first term r is the common ratio (what you multiply one term by to get the next, this could also be a positive or negative fraction or decimal)
What is this formula for? What does each variable stand for? nth term of an arithmetic sequence u(1) is the first term d is the common difference (what you add to one term to get the next, this could be positive or negative)
What is this formula for? What does each variable stand for? Percentage Error V(A) is the approximate value, V(E) is the exact (or correct) value The vertical lines mean absolute value (give positive answer)
What is this format called? What do the last two lines mean? Standard form or Scientific Notation n is between 1 and 10 (not including 10). n is an integer (positive or negative whole number, or zero)
Simple Interest means... you get the same amount of money every year (% of the initial amount). Use arithmetic sequences.
What is this formula for? What does each variable stand for?
What is this formula for? What does each variable stand for?
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