Understanding New Requirements for Leadership of School Improvement

diane zack
Slide Set by , created about 2 years ago

Using Literature to Understand New Requirements for Leadership of School Improvement

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diane zack
Created by diane zack about 2 years ago
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Slide 1

    Understanding New Requirements for Leadership of School Improvement Goal:  To use research articles to communicate an understanding of Leadership as related to the following framework. The critical leadership characteristics needed to promote continuous school improvement The organizational factors that impede or ameliorate leadership efforts Defining what is meant by instructional leadership
    Caption: : Diane Zack
    Diane Zack Lesson 05 Assignment

Slide 2

    Understanding Leadership of School
    Part 1:  Literature on Leadership as Related to the Given Framework   Part 2:  Synthesis of the Literature as Related to the Given Framework   Part 3:  My Understanding of What Constitutes "Instructional Leadership"

Slide 3

    Understanding Leadership of School
    Part 1:  Literature on Leadership as Related to the Given Framework

Slide 4

    Caption: : New Requirements for Leadership in School Improvement (Leithwood et al., 2007)
    Caption: : Leithwood, K., Mascall, B., Strauss, T., Sacks, R. Memon, N., & Yashkina, A. (2007): Distributing Leadership to Make Schools Smarter: Taking the Ego Out of the System. Leadership and Policy in Schools, 6(1), 37–67.
    The Literature on Leadership

Slide 5

    The Literature on Leadership
    Caption: : Wahlstrom, K. L., Paul, S. T., & Michlin, M. L. (2009). Perception vs. reality: Principal actions and teacher views on instructional leadership. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association. San Diego, CA.
    Caption: : New Requirements for Leadership in School Improvement (Wahlstrom et al., 2009)

Slide 6

Slide 7

Slide 8

    Understanding Leadership of School
    Part 2:  Synthesis of the Literature as Related to the Given Framework

Slide 9

Slide 10

Slide 11

Slide 12

    Understanding Leadership of School
    Part 3:    My Understanding of What Constitutes "Instructional Leadership"

Slide 13

    My Understanding of What Constitutes "Instructional Leadership"
              I believe that "Instructional Leadership" is an activity which, as Wahlstrom et al., (2009) suggests is directly linked to instruction.  It is the capacity of a person, not necessarily an administrator, to encourage changes to instructional practices within a school.   Within a district, the leader will have increased opportunities to implement school improvements if the structure of the environment allows for open dialog, professional respect, trust, professional growth, and a shared mission or vision firmly focused on student learning (Wahlstrom et al, 2009; Leithwood et al., 2007; Kennedy et al., 2011).                 Diane Zack

Slide 14

    Lesson 05 Diane Zack
    Leithwood, K., Mascall, B., Strauss, T., Sacks, R. Memon, N., & Yashkina, A. (2007): Distributing Leadership to Make Schools Smarter: Taking                 the Ego Out of the System. Leadership and Policy in Schools, 6(1), 37–67. Kennedy, A., Deuel, A., Nelson, T.H., & Slavit, D. (2011). Requiring collaboration or distributing leadership? Phi Delta Kappan, 92(8), 20–24. Spillane, J. (2009). Managing to lead: Reframing school leadership and management, Phi Delta Kappan, 91(3), 70–73. Wahlstrom, K. L., Paul, S. T., & Michlin, M. L. (2009). Perception vs. reality: Principal actions and teacher views on instructional leadership.                   Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association. San Diego, CA.