BELIEFS IN SOCIETY// RELIGIOUS ORGANISATIONS

elliesteel2
Flashcards by elliesteel2, updated more than 1 year ago
elliesteel2
Created by elliesteel2 almost 6 years ago
39
2

Description

A Level SOCIOLOGY// BELIEFS IN SOCIETY Flashcards on BELIEFS IN SOCIETY// RELIGIOUS ORGANISATIONS, created by elliesteel2 on 05/26/2015.

Resource summary

Question Answer
Religion and social change: Conservative force; FUNCTIONALISM Religion doesn’t change society but that is a good thing because religion is crucial to society functioning and it being healthy Evaluation: Pro:Religion does have positive functions which help keep society together. Con: They ignore the reality that religion has been a source of conflict and division Con:Marxism and Feminism say religion doesn’t change this to preserve inequality
Religion and social change: Conservative force; MARXISM Religion doesn’t change society, this is a bad thing because religion is a tool used by the bourgeoisie to exploit the Proletariat Evaluation: Pro:Religion can be divisive and oppressive. Con: Ignores the functional aspects that religion gives to its believers Con: Feminism says not oppressive to working class but women.
Religion and social change: Conservative force; FEMINISM Religion doesn’t change society, this is a bad thing because religion is used by men to dominate over women in social life Evaluation Pro: Highlights the reality that some religion treat men and women differently. Con:Not all religions are patriarchal – evangelical, Sikhism, Buddhism Con: Functionalism says religion is good for society
Religion and social change: RADICAL FORCE// Neo-Marxism Religion is a radical force because Gramsci and Maduro say religion could be used to change society if the working class go to them for support
Religion and social change: RADICAL FORCE// Max Weber 1. The Protestant Ethic The idea that Calvinists believers no longer work to survive but as a calling to get into god’s good graces 2. The Spirit of Capitalism To spend money on yourself is frowned upon so believers reinvest money in their businesses 3. Social change The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism actually change society economically
Religion and social change: RADICAL FORCE// Steve Bruce – Religion and social protest movements The Black civil rights movement This movement in the 50’s and 60’s changed racial segregation in America. Christianity and Martin Luther King were crucial in gaining public support for the movement which ended segregation in 1964. - the black clergy were able to shame whites into changing the law by appealing to their shared Christian values of equality. - Churches and meeting places were sanctuaries and prayers and hymns a source of unity
Religion and social change: RADICAL FORCE// Steve Bruce – Religion and social protest movements The Christian Right This is a politically and morally conservative, protestant fundamentalist movement. They wish to make abortion, homosexuality and divorce illegal. They campaign for traditional family values and gender roles and for creationism to be taught in schools. Main problem: They go against mainstream American liberal, democratic values
Religious Organisations S.C.R.E.A.M// Churches Troeltsch (1912) Size of organisation: large Commitment: low Relationship to society: accepts wider society Examples: Roman Catholic Church Church of England Attracts: higher classes due to conservative ideology Membership: inclusive
Religious Organisations S.C.R.E.A.M// Sects Troeltsch (1912) Size of organisation: small Commitment: high Relationship to society: hostile to wider society Examples: Jehovah Witness Evangelical Christianity Attracts: poor and oppressed Membership: exclusive
Religious Organisations S.C.R.E.A.M// Denominations Niebuhr (1929) Size of organisation: medium Commitment: some restrictions but less than sects Relationship to society: accepts wider society Examples: Methodists Baptists Attracts: those who believe the original message has been lost Membership: less exclusive than sect but doesn’t appeal to all of society
Religious Organisations S.C.R.E.A.M// Cults Niebuhr (1929) Size of organisation: small Commitment: low Relationship to society: accepts wider society Examples: Scientology Transcendental meditation Attracts: people who have moved away from meta-narratives to the power within themselves Membership: inclusive
Religious Organisations: Types of religious organisation// Roy Wallis – New Religious Movements (1984) Wallis says a new type of religious movement has emerged in the 60’s and 70’s which previous definitions cannot account for 1. World-rejecting NRM Jim Jones, Children of God and the Moonies all reject society’s norms and values for a religious alternative. 2. World accommodating Neo-Pentecostalists and the Subud choose to neither reject or accept society’s values but prefer to focus on religious matters. 3. World affirming Scientology and Transcendental meditation accept the world and offer success in mainstreams goals like relationships. These are often called psychological religions
Religious Organisations: Types of religious organisation// Denomination or death Neibuhr says the life of a sect is often short lived they either die out or abandon their extreme beliefs in order to become a denomination.
Religious Organisations: Types of religious organisation// Sectarian Cycle 1. A split between organisations. 2. A charismatic leader takes charge. 3. Second generation more disinterested than the first. 4. Sect becomes more world-accepting to each tension. 5. Radical members start a new sect which has a more original message.
Religious Organisations: Types of religious organisation// Explanations for growth 1. Marginality Troeltsch and Weber both highlight that sects tend to draw from the poor and oppressed in society for whom they offer a religious justification for their misfortune. 2. Relative deprivation This refers to the subjective sense of being spiritually deprived in relation to other people and wanting this fulfilled. 3. Social change People may turn to sects as a result of rapid social change in society. Changing social norms and values leads to insecurity, some may turn to sects as a solution to this.
Religious Organisations: Types of religious organisation// Heelas – New Age Movements These are a collection of beliefs prominent since the 1980’s. These include beliefs in UFO’s and aliens, astrology, tarot cards, crystals, various forms of alternative medicine like holistic healing and psychotherapy, yoga, meditation and magic. Self-spirituality: New Age seeking the spiritual have turned away from external religions such as churches and instead look inside themselves. Detraditionalisation The New Age rejects the authority of traditional sources such as priests or sacred texts in favour of personal experience and discovering the truth within yourself.
Religious Organisations: Types of religious organisation// Reasons for growth of NAM’s Heelas (1996) NAM’s linked with:- 1. A source of identity 2. Consumer culture 3. Rapid social change 4. Decline in organised religion
Religious Organisations: Types of religious organisation// Reasons for growth of NAM’s POST MODERNITY John Drane argues their growth is due to postmodernism and a growth in meta-narratives. This loss of faith leads them inwards.
Religious Organisations: Types of religious organisation// Reasons for growth of NAM’s Bruce says NAM’s linked to individualism of late modernity not postmodernism
Religious Organisations: Types of religious organisation// NAM'S feautures 1. No organised structure 2. No leaders or text 3. Emphasis on environment 4. Very individualistic 5. Any-one can join and choose commitment.
Show full summary Hide full summary

Similar

Theories of Religion
Heloise Tudor
Sociology- Beliefs in Society (Theories)
Rachel Pearce
Sociology: beliefs in society
Kalyanii Garrido
Sociology- Beliefs in Society
Rachel Pearce
Functionalist Theory of Religion
leeya_chowdhury
Secularisation
Gabzay
Factors Affecting Religiosity
Gabzay
Beliefs in Society-UNFINISHED
colzierose
Functionalism and religion
amy.wade16
RELIGIOUS FUNDAMENTALISM
ashiana121
FUNCTIONALIST
ayesha.nicolee