Exam Prep Mult/DIv

Jordyn Pitman
Flashcards by Jordyn Pitman, updated more than 1 year ago
Jordyn Pitman
Created by Jordyn Pitman about 5 years ago
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EDCURRIC 204 Exam Prep
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Question Answer
Partitive/Sharing Division Definition You know the number of groups and you are trying to find the amount inside each group. Number of shares are known.
Partitive/Sharing Division Example 20 biscuits altogether. They are equally shared between 5 dogs, how many biscuits does each dog get? 20/5 = 4 biscuits each.
Quotative/Measuring Division Definition You know the amount in each group, you are trying to find out how many groups there are. Size of the share is known.
Quotative/Measuring Division Example 20 biscuits altogether. Each dog gets an equal amount of 4 biscuits each. How many dogs get a share of the biscuits? 20/4 = 5 dogs.
Multiplication/Division Properties Commutative Associative Distributive Inverse/Reversibility
Commutative Definition Change the order of factors.
Associative Definition Doubling, halving, thirding and trebling. Division: Factorising Multiplication: Proportional adjustment
Distributive Definition Splitting factors and using tidy numbers. Division: Chunking Multiplication: Place value partitioning Both: Rounding and compensating
Inverse Definition Doing and undoing. Reversing.
Counting All (CA) Features Counting using units of one. Multiplication: forming sets and counting objects by one Division: Sharing objects one by one or forming sets and counting by one.
Advanced Counting (AC) - Early Additive (EA) Stage 4 - Stage 5 Composite counting. Multiplication: skip counting or repeated addition. Division: sharing or subtraction by skip counting.
Advanced Additive (AA) Stage 6 Known facts and deriving. Multiplication: knowing facts and using commutative, associative and distributive properties to find unknown facts. Division: sharing, repeated subtraction through reverse multiplication (inverse).
Problem Types Equal groups Rate Comparison Part-Whole Cartesian Product Rectangular area
Equal Groups Sharing and forming of equal groups.
Rate Use of measurable units such as time.
Comparison Comparing a quantity to find another.
Part-Whole Uses more than one method to find whole answer e.g ratio andmultiplication
Cartesian Product Combinations made from two different quantities
Rectangular Area Two factors combined to make a product. Changing the order of factors doesn't change the product.
Factorisation Division proportional adjustment: 136/8 = 136/2/2/2 = 68/2 = 34/2 = 17
Number Knowledge Division: 130/5 = 130/10 x2 = 13x2 = 26
Chunking Division place value partitioning: 136/8 = 80/8 + 56/8 = 10+7 = 17
Rounding and Compensating Division Division: 136/8 = 160/8 -24/8 = 20-3 = 17
Place Value Partioning Multiplication: 38x5 = 30x5 +8x5 = 150+40 = 190
Proportional Adjustment Multiplication: 38x5 = 19x10 = 190
Rounding and Compensating Multiplication: 38x5 = 40x5 - 2x5 = 200-10 = 190
Division is The inverse of multiplication and repeated subtraction.
Multiplication is The inverse of division and repeated addition.
Place value partitioning extra examples 3x37= 3x30 + 3x7 5x42= 5x40 + 5x2 4x29= 4x20 + 4x9
Rounding and Compensating extra examples 6x24= 6x25 - 6x1 3x29= 3x30 - 3x1 7x19= 7x20 - 7x1
Proportional Adjustment extra examples 8x12= 4x24 = 2x48
Young-Loveridge (2005) key points _____________________________________________
Young-Loveridge (2005) Implications _____________________________________________
Neill (2008) key points _____________________________________________
Neill (2008) Implications _____________________________________________
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