Chapter 3 - Book 1

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Flashcards by selinaward, updated more than 1 year ago
selinaward
Created by selinaward about 7 years ago
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Childhood a development approach

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Childhood has been studied using a more scientific approach since the 19th and 20th century Researchers became increasingly interested in studying the developmental stages of childhood, alongside various other factors affecting the health and social welfare of children
Wild Boy of Averyron - influential stories that originated a more scientific approach to research Young boy found living feral in the woods. Researchers made different conclusions as to weather the boy would be able to learn normal human behaviour including communication. They also debated as to whether his behavior was due to a lack of human interaction and companionship because he had learnt no normal human behaviors nor did he show any interest in other humans
Wild Boy of Averyron - supported John Locke’s belief children learn through a combination of experience, positive teaching and guidance from adults, all of which this boy this was lacking in
Developmental scientists research in order to discover and explain new observations whilst testing the competing claims and adequacy of existing theories surrounding childhood scientific approaches leave little room for misinterpreting or bias analysis of information because children’s development is based on their own ability and this is very difficult to manipulate Issues could include - what to bench mark development against, circumstances, environment, age and gender
Development approaches use a combination of different factors to benchmark their findings against “development” itself is hard to measure as it is based on various situations, experiences and also cultural, gender and class expectations. For example, comparing minority and majority world development in children would not be fair representation
Charles Darwin - one of the first and most significant researcher to write and record early child development theories 1840’s studied his own son William, nicknamed “Doddy" combination of different observations to measure and test Doddy’s physical and mental capabilities
Jean Piaget (1896-1980) was arguably one of the most influential developmental theorists to study intellectual and social development in children Piaget’s theory was that children develop their cognitive ability over a set period of time, he summarised these stages as; Sensori-motor (0-2yrs), Pre-operational (2-6 yrs), Concrete operational (6-12yrs) and formal operational (12yrs+). These stages are often used in education and health practices today and many childhood practices are based on an understanding that children develop cognitively according to their age
Lev Vygotsky (1986) was a Russian psychologist who dismissed aspects of Piaget’s theory on child development linked to cognitive ability argued a more sociocultural view that child development was influenced by various aspects of their environment such as their relationships, their agency and the ways they process thought Vygotsky believed such social and cultural influences played a vital role in their development and that such developments mean child development cannot be generalised for all children
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