Resource summary

Computer Performance
  1. cores
    1. A quad-core processor is a chip with four independent units called cores that read and execute central processing unit (CPU) instructions such as add, move data, and branch. Within the chip, each core operates in conjunction with other circuits such as cache, memory management, and input/output (I/O) ports.
      1. A multi-core processor is a computer processor integrated circuit with two or more separate processing units, called cores, each of which reads and executes program instructions, as if the computer had several processors.[1] The instructions are ordinary CPU instructions (such as add, move data, and branch) but the single processor can run instructions on separate cores at the same time, increasing overall speed for programs that support multithreading or other parallel computing techniques.[2] Manufacturers typically integrate the cores onto a single integrated circuit die (known as a chip multiprocessor or CMP) or onto multiple dies in a single chip package. The microprocessors currently used in almost all personal computers are multi-core. A multi-core processor implements multiprocessing in a single physical package. Designers may couple cores in a multi-core device tightly or loosely. For example, cores may or may not share caches, and they may implement message passing or shared-
    2. RAM
      1. RAM (pronounced ramm) is an acronym for random access memory, a type of computer memory that can be accessed randomly; that is, any byte of memory can be accessed without touching the preceding bytes. RAM is found in servers, PCs, tablets, smartphones and other devices, such as printers.
        1. Random-access memory (RAM /ræm/) is a form of computer memory that can be read and changed in any order, typically used to store working data and machine code.[1][2] A random-access memory device allows data items to be read or written in almost the same amount of time irrespective of the physical location of data inside the memory. In contrast, with other direct-access data storage media such as hard disks, CD-RWs, DVD-RWs and the older magnetic tapes and drum memory, the time required to read and write data items varies significantly depending on their physical locations on the recording medium, due to mechanical limitations such as media rotation speeds and arm movement.
        2. cache
          1. The cache (pronounced "cash") is a space in your computer's hard drive and in RAM memory where your browser saves copies of previously visited Web pages. Your browser uses the cache like a short-term memory.
            1. In computing, a cache is a hardware or software component that stores data so that future requests for that data can be served faster; the data stored in a cache might be the result of an earlier computation or a copy of data stored elsewhere. A cache hit occurs when the requested data can be found in a cache, while a cache miss occurs when it cannot. Cache hits are served by reading data from the cache, which is faster than recomputing a result or reading from a slower data store; thus, the more requests that can be served from the cache, the faster the system performs.
            2. clock speed
              1. the operating speed of a computer or its microprocessor, expressed in cycles per second (megahertz).
                1. The clock rate typically refers to the frequency at which the Clock generator of a processor can generate pulses, which are used to synchronize the operations of its components,[1] and is used as an indicator of the processor's speed. It is measured in clock cycles per second or its equivalent, the SI unit hertz (Hz). The clock rate of the first generation of computers was measured in hertz or kilohertz (kHz), the first personal computers (PCs) to arrive throughout the 1970s and 1980s had clock rates measured in megahertz (MHz), and in the 21st century the speed of modern CPUs is commonly advertised in gigahertz (GHz). This metric is most useful when comparing processors within the same family, holding constant other features that may affect performance. Video card and CPU manufacturers commonly select their highest performing units from a manufacturing batch and set their maximum clock rate higher, fetching a higher price.[citation needed]
                Show full summary Hide full summary

                Similar

                Hitler and the Nazi Party (1919-23)
                Adam Collinge
                History of Medicine: Ancient Ideas
                James McConnell
                GCSE French - The Environment
                Abby B
                4 Lesson Planning Tips for Teachers
                Micheal Heffernan
                Repaso Revalida PR 2016
                Rodrigo Lopez
                APARATO RESPIRATORIO
                Ariana Chavez
                Mapa Conceptual Comportamientos del Consumidor
                kariina jaime
                Visual Basic
                Javier Emmanuel
                máquinas y estructuras
                Agustina Moyano
                Mapa Conceptual Comportamientos del Consumidor
                Rosario Pellejero
                Atomic numbers and mass numbers quiz
                Brigitte Bunge