3 approaches to Argument

Shoonie
Mind Map by Shoonie, updated more than 1 year ago
Shoonie
Created by Shoonie over 6 years ago
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Description

This MindMap talks about the 3 approaches to argument and goes into detail about what they need and what their components mean.

Resource summary

3 approaches to Argument
  1. Classical
    1. 6 components of the classical approach: intro, state your case, proposition, refutation, substiantion and proof, conclusion.
      1. purpose of intro: captures the attention of the audience and urges the audience to consider your case.
        1. stating your case: clarify your issue and give necessary background.
          1. proposition: state your central proposition or thesis. present the subtopics or supportive points.
            1. refutation: analyze the opposition's argument and summarize it. point out faulty reasoning.
              1. substantiation and proof: develop your own case. use ethos, pathos, and logos. use good evidence like examples.
                1. conclusion: summarizes your most important points and can include appeals to feelings or values.
              2. Rogerian
                1. components to the Rogerian approach include: an intro, a neutral statement of opposite beliefs, a neutral statement and explanation, an analysis, a proposal.
                  1. the intro: briefly and objectively defines the issue or problem.
                    1. stating the opponents view: demonstrates the writer clearly understands the opponent's point of view.
                      1. neutral statement and explanation of your argument: demonstrates your position and why it is valid.
                        1. analysis: demonstrates that the two positions have in common and what goals and values they share.
                          1. proposal: a statement that resolves the issue in s way that shows the interests of both sides of the argument.
                        2. Toulmin
                          1. basic components: claim, grounds, warrants, backing, qualifier, rebuttal.
                            1. Claim: a statement that you are asking the other person to accept.
                              1. grounds: the basis of a real persuasion. it is made up of hard data and hard facts.
                                1. warrants: links data and other grounds to a claim.
                                  1. backing: gives the additional support to the warrant by answering questions.
                                    1. qualifier: indicates the strength of the leap from the data to the warrant and could limit how universally the claim applies.
                                      1. rebuttal: a counter agreement proposed by the opposition.
                                        1. Toulim uses GASCAP (generalization, analogy, sign, casualty, authority, principle).
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