English Literary Terminology

Fionnghuala Malone
Flashcards by , created over 5 years ago

AS/ A Level English Flashcards on English Literary Terminology, created by Fionnghuala Malone on 04/20/2014.

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Fionnghuala Malone
Created by Fionnghuala Malone over 5 years ago
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Question Answer
Anaphora Reference back to something that came earlier in a sentence
Cataphora Reference forward to something that comes later in a sentence
Assonance Repetition of vowel sounds
Caesura A break in a line of poetry (mid-line)
Collocation Words that occur together so frequently that there are more or less predicatble
Connotation Word association: Red = Anger Green = Envy Blue = Depression
Consonance Repetition of consonants in the middle or end of words
Eye Rhyme Where two words look like they rhyme but they don't
Feminine Rhyme Have 2 or more syllables
Interior Monologue The presentation of a character's thoughts in a narrative text, enabling the reader to understand the character more fully
Verbal Irony Saying one thing but meaning the oppositte
Dramatic Irony When the audience know something the character does not
Irony of a situation When an outcome of the reverse of what might normally be expected
Juxtaposition the setting of things next to each other for literary effect
Masculine rhymes Have one syllable
Metaphor a comparison where the two things are identified completely: The blanket of fog descended. (An extended metaphor is where the poet continues to use and develop the image as the poem progresses.)
Metre regular patterns of stressed and unstressed syllables used in poetry. The most famous is iambic pentameter or blank verse used frequently by Shakespeare.
Onomatopoeia the sound of the word imitates the original object
Peripeteia a turning point in the plot of a literary text; a reversal of fortune in the circumstances of a ‘hero’ or other character in a text
Semantic Field A group of words all coming from the same category
Sibilance Consonant sounds characterized by hissing
Simile A comparison using like or as
Soliloquy Speech delivered by a character alone onstage talking to themselves