English Midterm

Noelani Buonomo
Mind Map by Noelani Buonomo, updated more than 1 year ago
Noelani Buonomo
Created by Noelani Buonomo about 4 years ago
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academy of the holy angels sophomore midterms 2016 english II HH
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Resource summary

English Midterm
1 Works
1.1 Navajo Origin Legend
1.1.1 Viewed the winds as a source of life
1.1.1.1 Winds=Breath
1.1.2 Worshiped Nature
1.1.3 Showed the creation of the first man and first woman
1.2 Earth on the Turtle's Back
1.2.1 Personification
1.2.1.1 Gives the animals human traits
1.2.2 Determination and Compassion

Annotations:

  • If you are perceived as weak, determination and hard work will bring you where you want to go.
1.2.3 Nature

Annotations:

  • nature can be good for us, do not harm nature, use it for your benefit but also give back to the earth as well and do not harm it.
1.3 Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano
1.3.1 Made society face the cruelties of slavery and contributed to the banning of slave trade.
1.3.2 Descriptive, horrifying journey on the slave ships
1.4 To My Dear And Loving Husband
1.4.1 Last line captures central idea

Annotations:

  • "That when we live no more, we may live ever" Her poem was a way to immortalize her husband's love for her and her love for her husband
1.4.2 Title worded almost like a letter

Annotations:

  • Communicates not only to the world but also to her husband. Compares herself to other women. Seems like she's talking to her husband. Uses Apostrophe.
1.4.3 Repetition- If ever, if ever, if ever

Annotations:

  • Wants to repeat over and over how much she loves him
1.4.4 Puritan perspective
1.4.4.1 Wants to show she's a good, religious wife

Annotations:

  • It shows belief in heaven and shows the reader that she is a good, Puritan wife
1.5 Huswifery

Annotations:

  • Edward Taylor
1.5.1 Metaphysical Poetry

Annotations:

  • Classifies groups that share common characteristics using strong imagery and complicated plots.
1.5.2 Conceits

Annotations:

  • Elaborate, unusual metaphors that compare unlike things. Writing about housework, but not about real housework- actually about God and him.
1.5.3 Seems like he's talking about housework, but it's a metaphor for relationship with God

Annotations:

  • Giving imagery for religion- says he wants God to use him like a spinning wheel to make something God will be proud of.
1.6 To His Excellence, George Washington
1.6.1 Supports the Revolution
1.6.2 Praises efforts of George Washington
1.7 Sinners in the Hands of An Angry God
1.7.1 Terrified listeners
1.7.2 Sermon
1.7.3 Described hell vividly; threatening
1.7.4 Says it is only the power of God that hold sinners above hell; people must change their ways
1.8 Crisis No. 1
1.8.1 Series of essays by Thomas Paine
1.8.2 Read to soldiers in the Revolutionary War
1.8.3 Argued for independence and freedom
1.9 Speech to the Virginia Convention
1.9.1 Argued for the fight for full independence from Britain
1.9.2 Says peaceful arguement didn't work, so what else is there to try?
1.9.3 Patrick Henry
1.9.4 "Give me liberty, or give me death!"
1.10 Ben Franklin's Autobiography
1.10.1 Created 13 virtues that he wanted to obtain and a daily schedule
1.10.2 Moral questions
1.10.2.1 What good do I wish to do today?
1.10.2.2 What good have I done today?
1.10.3 Knows most will give up when a task proves too grueling- speckled ax anecdote
1.10.4 Gave up trying to obtain all the virtues, but happy he went through the experience of trying to do it
1.10.5 Wanted moral perfection
1.11 Poor Richard's Almanac
1.11.1 Aphorisms
1.11.1.1 Short wise sayings meant for moral instruction or practical advice
1.12 The Tide Rises, The Tide Falls
1.12.1 “The day returns, but nevermore returns the traveler to the shore…”
1.12.1.1 Shows that the earth will keep turning even after one is dead.
1.12.2 Romanticism
1.12.3 Exemplifies the ebbing of day and night (day and night represent life and death)
1.12.4 While it is talking about death, the poem also retains a sense of calm
1.12.4.1 The rhyme pattern and the meter adds to the calming feeling of the poem
1.12.4.2 “soft white hands” as an analogy for the sea foam and waves
1.13 Thanatopsis
1.13.1 Becoming one with nature, nature will always lift your spirits
1.13.2 Death- uses sleep as a metaphor for death
1.13.2.1 Making it seem peaceful, a natural process
1.13.3 Blank verse makes it sound more natural
1.14 The Raven
1.14.1 Evokes a feeling of fear
1.14.2 Solitude- narrarator is alone
1.14.3 Psycological torment
1.14.4 Lenore
1.14.4.1 Doomed character- "nevermore" will she return
1.15 Hop-Frog
1.15.1 Gothic Elements
1.15.1.1 Macabre
1.15.1.2 Remote setting
1.15.1.3 Malevolence
1.15.2 Poetic justice
1.15.2.1 King dies on chains, king used to restrain Hop Frog
1.16 The Devil and Tom Walker
1.16.1 After selling soul, Tom becomes a usury (lending money at unreasonably high interest rates)
1.16.2 Poetic Justice- deserved a specific type of punishment.
1.16.3 Allegory- everything is symbolic
1.16.4 Highly archetypal
1.17 Nature
1.17.1 Natural setting
1.17.1.1 Symbolizes leaving stress behind and entering into a more simple space.

Annotations:

  • RWE equates this with youth (innocence)
1.17.2 Cast off- a person "sheds" their years and becomes anew in nature
1.17.3 Transparent eyeball

Annotations:

  • not really there just a disembodied thing who is taking everything in
1.17.3.1 He's there but it's not about him- not self-centered, no ego.
1.17.3.2 Put the experience first rather than be obsessed with yourself in the experience.
1.17.4 Oneness- immersion
1.18 Self-Reliance
1.18.1 Live in an authentic way and don't conform to society
1.18.2 Individuality
1.18.3 "Foolish consistency"
1.18.3.1 Doing something just because other people told you to
1.19 Concord Hymn
1.19.1 Battle of Lexington and Concord
1.19.2 "Shot heard round the world"- synechdoche
1.19.3 Rememberance of deaths of ancestors
1.19.4 Stylized for more formal setting
1.19.5 Those who fought in battle are long gone but memory lives on
1.20 Walden
1.20.1 Thoreau warns against the dangers of commitment
1.20.2 Wanted to prove that he could live simply and purposefully
1.20.3 Embraced life of solitude and inward reflection
1.20.4 Freedom in simplicity
1.21 Civil Disobedience
1.21.1 Government is just a tool; the best government is one that doesn't govern
1.21.2 Government imposes on the people
1.21.3 People must demand respect of the government
1.21.4 calls for better government
2 Authors
2.1 Edgar Allen Poe
2.1.1 Born in Boston
2.1.2 Could never escape from poverty. Miserable Life
2.1.3 Gothic works
2.1.4 His wife was only source of happiness.
2.1.4.1 She died, leaving Poe devastated. Inspiration for doomed female characters

Annotations:

  • Doomed female characters- Madeline (Fall of the House of Usher) Lenore (The Raven) Annabel Lee
2.1.5 Shortly after his birth, he was taken in by the family of John Allan.
2.1.6 Expelled from West Point and the Univirsity of Virginia
2.2 Ben Franklin

Annotations:

  • Wrote Poor Richard's Almanac Wrote his Autobiography
2.2.1 Worked as printer through teens and early adulthood
2.2.1.1 Wrote parts of newspaper under name "Silence Dogood"- wrote letters satirizing life in Boston
2.2.2 Successful scientist as well
2.2.2.1 Bifocals, glass armonica, and lighting rod
2.2.3 Also a statesman and diplomat
2.2.3.1 Best remembered for career in politics

Annotations:

  • "father of his country"
2.3 Anne Bradstreet
2.3.1 Puritan upbringing
2.3.2 8 children, illnesses, and hardship
2.3.3 Devoted spare moments to "unladylike" occupation of writing
2.3.4 Wrote the first collection of original poetry in colonial America
2.3.5 Wrote about feelings and joys of everyday Puritan life
2.3.5.1 To My Dear and Loving Husband
2.3.6 Belief in heaven, attempts to show reader she was a good Puritan
2.4 Patrick Henry
2.4.1 Talented speaker
2.4.1.1 Could move his listeners easily.
2.4.2 "Give me liberty or give me death"
2.4.2.1 Inspired colonists to unite in effort to win independance from Britain.
2.4.3 Voice of protest

Annotations:

  • powerful speech in opposition to the Stamp Act
2.4.3.1 Opposition to the Stamp Act
2.4.4 Call to Arms

Annotations:

  • Speech to the Virginia Convention
2.4.4.1 Powerful impact, fed the spirit of the Revolution that led to the signing of the Declaration of Independance.
3 Terms
3.1 Puritan Plainstyle
3.1.1 Simple words, everyday objects, and references to God
3.2 Meter
3.2.1 The regular pattern of beats in a line
3.3 Metaphor
3.3.1 A comparison between two things; saying that something is something else, when really it isn't
3.4 Simile
3.4.1 A comparison between two things using "like" or "as"
3.5 Apostrophe
3.5.1 Speaking directly to an absent or dead person, or to a thing
3.5.1.1 Ex: The Author to Her Book by Bradstreet
3.6 Logos, Pahos, Ethos
3.6.1 Ethos- ethical appeal, speaks to ethical side of people
3.6.2 Logos- Logical Appeal, appeals to logic, fact, and reason
3.6.3 Pathos- appeals to emotions such as love and fear
3.7 Paradox
3.7.1 Statement that seems contradictory but actually presents a truth
3.8 Elegy
3.8.1 a poem of serious reflection, typically a lament for the dead

Annotations:

  • Concord Hymn
3.9 Anecdote
3.9.1 A short and amusing or interesting story about a real incident or person
3.10 Aphorism
3.10.1 Short wise saying meant for moral instruction or practical advice
3.10.1.1 Ex: Poor Richard's Alamac
3.11 Origin Myth
3.11.1 A myth that tries to describe the origin of some feature of the natural world
3.12 Iambic Meter
3.12.1 Iambic Monometer
3.12.2 Dimeter
3.12.3 Trimeter
3.12.4 Tetrameter
3.12.5 Pentameter
3.12.6 Hexameter
3.12.7 Alliteration
3.12.7.1 Repetition of initial consonant sounds
3.12.8 Synechdoche
3.12.8.1 A saying that represents a larger piece
3.12.8.1.1 "Shot heard round the world"
3.13 Personification
3.13.1 Figurative language in which an inhuman thing or being is given human qualities
3.13.1.1 Ex: Earth on Turtle's Back
3.14 Hyperbole
3.14.1 Extreme exaggeration
3.15 Catalog Poem
3.15.1 Brings together many different images in a list format
3.16 Tone
3.16.1 The speaker or author's attitude towards a subject
3.17 Theme
3.17.1 Central Idea in a work of writing
3.18 Onomatopoeia
3.18.1 the formation of a word from a sound associated with what is named
3.19 Charged Words
3.19.1 Language that produces an emotional response
3.20 Archetype
3.20.1 An idea that is expressed in stories frequently, typical
3.21 Irony
3.21.1 Situational Irony
3.21.1.1 Irony involving a situation in which actions have an effect that is opposite from what was intended
3.21.2 Dramatic Irony
3.21.2.1 Is normally in speeches or a situation that is understood by the audience but not by the characters in the play; the audience knows something the characters don't
4 Literature Movements Or Periods
4.1 Romanticism
4.1.1 Gothic Writing
4.1.1.1 Focuses on the dark or evil aspects of people's lives
4.1.1.2 Also very emotional but has a lot of suspense and deals with evil
4.1.1.3 Edgar Allen Poe

Annotations:

  • Raven Hop Frog
4.1.1.4 Characteristics
4.1.1.4.1 Bleak or remote settings
4.1.1.4.2 Macabre or violent incidents
4.1.1.4.3 Supernatural elements
4.1.1.4.4 Strong language with dangerous meaning
4.1.1.5 Hawthorne

Annotations:

  • Scarlet Letter Minister's Black Veil
  • Ministers Black Veil
4.1.2 Literary and artistic movement
4.1.3 Nature as a source of truth
4.1.4 Begins in late 18th century
4.1.5 Emphasizes feelings of emotion over reason
4.1.6 Optimism, adventurous, imagination
4.2 Colonial Period
4.2.1 Age of Reason
4.2.1.1 Enlightenment challenged Puritan beliefs
4.2.2 Key Themes
4.2.2.1 Europeans come to America to create ideal civilization
4.2.2.2 Colonists learned to make wilderness productive with help of natives.
4.2.2.3 United States arose from Enlightenment ideals
4.2.3 Puritan Influence
4.2.3.1 William Bradford
4.2.3.2 Anne Bradstreet

Annotations:

  • To My Dear and Loving Husband
4.2.3.3 Edward Taylor
4.2.3.4 Johnathan Edwards

Annotations:

  • Sinners in the Hand of an Angry God
  • Puritan, angry speaker
4.3 Revolutionary Period
4.3.1 Call to Arms
4.3.1.1 Declaration of Independance
4.3.1.2 To His Excellency George Washington
4.3.1.3 Patrick Henry

Annotations:

  • Speech to the Virginia Convention
4.4 American Renassiance
4.4.1 Transcendentalism
4.4.1.1 Loose knit group of writers
4.4.1.2 Artists and reformers in 1830-1840s
4.4.1.3 Individual was at center of the universe
4.4.2 Self-Reliance
4.4.2.1 Independence and self-reliance
4.4.3 Fireside Poets
4.4.3.1 Chose uniquely American settings and subjects
4.4.3.1.1 Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
4.4.3.1.2 Oliver Wendell Holmes
4.4.3.1.3 James Russel Lowell
4.4.3.1.4 John Greenleaf Whittier
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