(2) To what extent have political ideologies changes in the UK?

Marcus  Danvers
Mind Map by Marcus Danvers, updated more than 1 year ago
Marcus  Danvers
Created by Marcus Danvers about 6 years ago
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A level People and Politics (Political Parties) Mind Map on (2) To what extent have political ideologies changes in the UK?, created by Marcus Danvers on 01/21/2014.

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(2) To what extent have political ideologies changes in the UK?
1 What is Social democracy
1.1 Social democracy is an ideological stance that supports a broad balance between a capitalist or market economy on the one hand and state intervention on the other
1.2 Although some see social democracy as a betrayal of socialism because it accepts the contining need for capitalis. Others view it as the only practical form of socialism.
1.3 Key goals of social democy is:
1.3.1 Reform or "humanized" capitalism, based on the economic efficiency that only capitalism can deliver and an enduring belief in equality and social justice
2 What is One Nation conservatism
2.1 It is an pragmatic and paternalistic form of conservatism that was prominent during the 1950s and 1960s.
2.2 One nation ideas can be traced back to the early writings of Benjamin Disraeli, Disraeli arned aginst the dangers of Britian being divided into "two nations: the rich and the poor".
2.3 His call for social reform to narrow (but not remove) social inequalities was based on the principles of paternalism. The rich therefor have an obligation to attend to the needs of the poor.
3 What is Consensus politics
3.1 An overlap of ideological positions between two or more political parties; an agreement about fundamental policy goals that permits disagreement on matters of detail or emphasis
4 Thatcherism
4.1 What is Thatcherism
4.1.1 Thstcherism does not so much constitute a coherent and systematic philosophy as an attempt to many two distinct tradtions.
4.1.2 Although there is political and ideological tensions between these distinct, they can be combined in support of the goals of a strong but minimal state: "the free market and a strong state"
4.1.3 The two elements within Thatcherism are:
4.1.3.1 Neoliberalism this is an updated version of classical liberalism. Its central pillars are the free market and the self-reliant individual
4.1.3.2 Neoconservatism, this is a form of authoritarian conservatism that calls for a restoration of order, authority and discipline in society
4.2 The central themes of "economic Thatcherism" were:
4.2.1 Reduced union power
4.2.1.1 The "problem" of the unions power was tackled by a series of laws that restricted the ability of unions to take industrial action. such measures both created a more flexible labour market and led to the growth of Low-wage and low-skill economy in many sectors
4.2.2 Privatization
4.2.2.1 Privatization. The "mixed economy" was transformed by the privatization of most of the industries that had been nationalized during the 20th century; examples included telecommunication, gas electricity, water, steel, buses and railways. the state lost control of major UK industries state"
4.2.3 Low taxes
4.2.3.1 It brought about a significant shift in the tax burden from direct taxes to indirect taxes. This substantially reduced the progressive nature of the UK tax system and, in the progcess, widned inequality
4.2.4 Deregulation
4.2.4.1 The Thatcher government removed a wide range of restrictions and controls on the economy. Controls on exchange rates wer ended, allowing the pound to "float" ; financial markets were deregulated; and subsidies and supports that had propped up "failing industries were scaled down or scrapped
4.3 The central themes of "social Thatcherism" were:
4.3.1 "Tough" law and order
4.3.1.1 Greater emphasis was placed on maintaining public order through a fear of punishment, reflected in the belied that "prison works". Custodial sentences were more widly used, prison terms were lengthened and, in some cases, "tougher" prison regimes were imosed
4.3.2 Traditional values
4.3.2.1 One of the enemies of social thatcherism was the spread of liberal or permissive values, associated in particular with the 1960s. Instead, tradtional, "Christian" or "family" values were defended.
4.3.3 National patriotism
4.3.3.1 Thatcherites placed a particular stress on strengthening national identity, seen as one of the cornerstones of political strength and social stability. Over time, this came increasingly to be expressed in the form of euroscepticism
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