Identity question, threats to identity.

Jen Collins
Note by Jen Collins, updated more than 1 year ago
Jen Collins
Created by Jen Collins about 8 years ago
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EXAM QUESTIONS Note on Identity question, threats to identity., created by Jen Collins on 05/29/2013.

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“Identity maybe threatened at all stages of life” (Unit 5 p. 45). Why can identity be threatened for people using care services? How can service users be supported? Discuss with reference to K101 case material. A persons identity can be described as how they view themselves in relation to the world around them and can be affected by life events. It comprises of appearance, choices, values, culture, beliefs, experiences and memories.When one of these things is put under threat so is a person’s sense of self When considering identity and the child need to look at John Bowlbys ATTACHMENT THEORY. Bowlby believed that unlike what was once believed babies weren't passive they did infact seek out realtionships and interactions with those around them, this became more permenant at the age of 6 mths when they formed what Bowlby called a secure attachment to their primary care giver who he considered to be the mother. Although with changing roles in society it is no longer always the mother who is the primary care giver. Bowlby believed that by observing the mothers interactions with the world around her that the child developed INTERNAL WORKING MODELS about what wld happen in certain situations. Another way in which to describe these models is as SCRIPTS AND STORIES, these are narratives children have in their head to explain how they think events will happen in the world, they will develop a script frm their very first experience of an event and this will only change when proven differernt. Not all stories are generalised some are specific and help to establish sense of self. Mothers and priamry carers delibertly set out to share stories to help child develop sense of self.Through the development of internal wrking models of relationship with their mother that children form an understanding of their own self Bowlby also stresses the imporatnce of a SECURE BASE (the mother) from which to explore the world, that is the mother provides the child with a relationship they can rely on to explore the world and how they fit into it. If the child has experienced disruption such as foster care placements like JORDAN then their ability to navigate life and develop their sense of self would be weak and ineffective. Care wrkers can offer support through the use of LIFE STORY WORK. LSW is a way to help people retain or re establish their sense of identity. It is so highly thought of that the DH reccommends it forms part of every childs records. It can be seen to promote the emphasis of parternship in working relationships with children demonstrated in the 1989 CHILDREN'S ACT. Importance of LSW also emphasised by RYAN AND WALKER who stress imporatnce of self and how it is crucial to healthy development and how the looked after child can be helped if they talk about the past, present and future. RYAN AND WALKER THE IMP OF LSW: children are entitled to accurate knowledge of their past and family and their direct involvement helps them to understand that many of their scripts and stories are inaccurate and that they are not the cause of the events that have led to their placement in care.It is the job of care workers such as SUZANNE McGLADDERY (Jordan's case worker) to guide the looked after child through the process, allowing them to question their own previously held beliefs as Jordan does about his father. It is her job to challenege any MAGICAL THINKING which ROSE and PHILPOT describe as they way in which a child fills in the gaps in their knowledge, they make it up. They say while it is important to challenge it, it is also imp to acknowledge it as no ones life is merley a collection of facts. RYAN AND WALKER also acknowledge this pitfal in LSW. The LSWorker must also be committed to the process as it is not a quick process, they must make the work individualised and person centred involving the child at each step, assessing, planning, implementation and evaluation of each step/action taken in the process. Many children in care develop DISRUPPTED NARRATIVES due to the many care TRANSITIONS they experience and while it is advised in the CHILDREN'S ACT1989 a way in which to effectivley manage these transitions and limit their impact on childs sense of self is through intro meetings with the foster carer. HEDY CLEVER noted this didn't happen so it then falls to the LSWorker to manage any possible fall out that occurs.LSW can also be used in DEMENTIA CARE and reminisence therapy and here BOWLBYS ATTACHMENT THEORY is also relevant. Researchers say that the fact that an indiviadual often calls out for their mother is confirmation of the continuity of childhood and the fact that they are searching for their secure base. LSW AND DEMENTIA involves working with the individual, their family carers and wider family to record aspects of their past and present lives so that it is used to improve their current situation and informs what care and support they may need now and in the future, taking account of their future wishes and aspirations. People, who may be vulnerable or marginalised through ill-health, are often defined by their diagnosis or living situation, rather than who they are as a person. This can have a detrimental effect on their relationships with others, particularly those who are paid to provide support and care for them, as they may know little of the uniqueness of the individual and the ‘problem’ (whatever it may be) takes centre stage. This is reflected in the poem KATE, which tells how an older patient feels as though they are seen as only a series of tasks and not as a person full of life experience. Their sense of identity and who they are has been affected by their illness and they are no longer viewed as the person they were. LSW makes the older person a person and not just the disease, it is a way of allowing the person to demonstrate their sense of identity and who they are for a time when they will no longer have the ability to do so LSW WITH CHILDREN ABOUT HELPING TO CREATE A NEW SECURE BASE AND WITH OLDER ABOUT REAFFIRMING THEIR SECURE BASE. CHILDREN ABOUT MAKING NEW MEMORIES, OLDER PEOPLE ABOUT SECURING AND SHARING MEMORIES

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