Sort of / kind of

Andrea Lladro
Note by Andrea Lladro, updated more than 1 year ago
Andrea Lladro
Created by Andrea Lladro about 3 years ago
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Sort of / kind of

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sort Sort is used as a noun to talk about a class of people or things. Sort is a countable noun. After words like all and several, you use sorts. There are all sorts of reasons why this is true. They sell several sorts of potatoes. After sorts of you can use either the plural or singular form of a noun. For example, you can say ‘They sell most sorts of shoes’ or ‘They sell most sorts of shoe’. The singular form is more formal. There were five different sorts of biscuits. They attract two main sorts of investor. After sort of you use the singular form of a noun. I know you're interested in this sort of thing. ‘What sort of car did she get?’ – ‘A sports car.’  In conversation, these and those are often used with sort. For example, people say ‘I don’t like these sort of jobs' or ‘I don’t like those sort of jobs'. This use is generally thought to be incorrect. Instead, you should say ‘I don’t like this sort of job' or ‘I don’t like that sort of job'. They never fly in this sort of weather. I've had that sort of experience before. In more formal English, you can also say ‘I don’t like jobs of this sort'. A device of that sort costs a lot of money. You can also use like this, like that, or like these after a noun. For example, instead of saying ‘this sort of weather’, you can say ‘weather like this’. I don't know why people say things like that. Cafés like these are found in every town in Britain. Kind is used in a similar way to sort.     sort of - kind of In conversation and in less formal writing, people use sort of or kind of in front of a noun to say that something could be described as being a particular thing. It's a sort of dictionary of dictionaries. I'm a kind of anarchist, I suppose. People also use sort of or kind of in front of adjectives, verbs, and other types of word to mean ‘a little’ or ‘in some way’, or with very little meaning. I felt kind of sorry for him. I've sort of heard of him, but I don't know who he is.     kind You use kind to talk about a class of people or things. Kind is a countable noun. After words like all and many, you use kinds, not ‘kind’. It will give you an opportunity to meet all kinds of people. The trees were filled with many kinds of birds. After kinds of you can use either the plural or singular form of a noun. For example, you can say ‘I like most kinds of cars’ or ‘I like most kinds of car’. The singular form is more formal. People have been working hard to produce the kinds of courses that we need. There will be two kinds of certificate. After kind of you use the singular form of a noun. I'm not the kind of person to get married. She makes the same kind of point in another essay.  In conversation, these and those are often used with kind. For example, people say ‘I don’t like these kind of films' or ‘I don’t like those kind of films'. This use is generally thought to be incorrect, and it is best to avoid it. Instead you should say ‘I don’t like this kind of film' or ‘I don’t like that kind of film'. There are problems with this kind of explanation. How will we answer that kind of question? In more formal English, you can also say ‘I don’t like films of this kind'. This is the best way of interpreting data of this kind. You can also use like this, like that, or like these after a noun. For example, instead of saying ‘this kind of film’, you can say ‘films like this’. I hope we see many more enterprises like this. I'd read a few books like that. Companies like these represent an important part of our economy. Sort is used in a similar way to kind.  

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