e-YDS1 DENEME

Description

Languages Quiz on e-YDS1 DENEME, created by KARACA AKADEMİ on 05/16/2018.
KARACA AKADEMİ
Quiz by KARACA AKADEMİ, updated more than 1 year ago
KARACA AKADEMİ
Created by KARACA AKADEMİ over 4 years ago
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Resource summary

Question 1

Question
1-8. SORULARDA, BOŞLUĞA GELEBİLECEK SÖZCÜK YA DA İFADEYİ BULUNUZ. Search teams in the Alps are warning that this year skiers need to be extra ______; even the most benign slopes off-piste can slide under a skier's weight.
Answer
  • vigilant
  • generous
  • content
  • massive
  • gloomy

Question 2

Question
Tunusia's new constitution could usher in momentous change for women, following the ______ of a clause which guarantees gender equality in legislative assemblies and for steps to be taken to protect women against violence, a first in the Arab world.
Answer
  • devotion
  • mention
  • instruction
  • adoption
  • illustration

Question 3

Question
The Diayou Islands in the East China Sea are the subject of a territorial dispute between China, Japan and Taiwan, and _______ concerns over increased militarisation in the region.
Answer
  • ascend
  • pursue
  • validate
  • move
  • raise

Question 4

Question
Two hunter-gatherer skeletons were discovered in a cave in the mountains of north-west Spain in 2006. The cool, dark conditions meant the remains (called La Brana 1 and 2) were ______ well preserved.
Answer
  • unliterally
  • convincingly
  • remarkably
  • devotedly
  • slightly

Question 5

Question
Molecular biologist Sir Kenneth Murray, who died last April at the age of 82, left £13,333,058 in his will to a trust he had ______ for young biologists.
Answer
  • taken off
  • set up
  • given away
  • gone on
  • handed down

Question 6

Question
Professionals helping child victims of sexual abuse are, unfortunately, not ______ with technological advances.
Answer
  • getting rid
  • getting in touch
  • keeping place
  • doing away
  • taking down

Question 7

Question
So far there ______ no cases of human-to-human transmission of H7N9; however, the virus could mutate, ______ it to spread more easily in people.
Answer
  • were / to allow
  • had been / allowed
  • would be / be allowing
  • are / to be allowed
  • have been / allowing

Question 8

Question
As the UK and the US ______ to withdraw the last remaining troops from Afgjanistan, hundreds of basas, thousands of vehicles and tonnes of equipment ______ up and shipped home, sold off or scrapped.
Answer
  • were prepared / seemed to pack
  • have prepared / should be packing
  • had prepared / were likely to pack
  • were preparing / had to be packed
  • have been preparing / would pack

Question 9

Question
09. - 16. SORULARDA, BOŞLUĞA GELEBİLECEK SÖZCÜK YA DA İFADEYİ BULUNUZ. _______ more solar energy going into the Arctic Ocean because of lost ice, there is reason to expect more extreme weather events, ______ heavy snowfall, heat waves and flooding in North America and Europe.
Answer
  • As / off to
  • With / such as
  • For / like
  • By / through
  • Upon / with

Question 10

Question
For every person in the US ______ by a shark, 25 ______ by New Yorkers.
Answer
  • biting / are bitten
  • bites / have bitten
  • bitten / get bitten
  • are bitten /are biting
  • being bitten / bite

Question 11

Question
______ Hyundai's US market share has slipped, recently to 4.7%, newly installed North America head David Zuchowski said on Monday that the company had a goal of reaching 5%
Answer
  • Since
  • Although
  • No matter what
  • Just as
  • Except that

Question 12

Question
Nathan Filler won the Costa Book of the Year with "The Shock of the Fall"; he beat best- selling novelist Kate Atkinson, ______ "Life After Life" was the bookmakers' favourite to win the overall prize.
Answer
  • whom
  • of whom
  • whence
  • whereby
  • whose

Question 13

Question
A simple map or graphic can really convey a story in a visual way that can be immediately grasped ______ it's on TV or online.
Answer
  • When
  • While
  • Unless
  • Whether
  • Though

Question 14

Question
A large majority of adults in China believe that students should respect their theachers ______ most European countries where only a minority believe that students should show respect.
Answer
  • in contrast to
  • hence
  • by all means
  • similarly
  • after all

Question 15

Question
The Prevent strategy in schools is harming integration ______ helping it in Bristol's communities.
Answer
  • due to
  • except for
  • on basis of
  • rather than
  • identical

Question 16

Question
According to most, ______ India ______ Pakistan must hold talks on Kashmir dispute, which is the only solution to the long-pending dispute.
Answer
  • so / that
  • as / as
  • more / than
  • neither / nor
  • both / and

Question 17

Question
17. - 21. SORULARDA, BOŞLUĞA GELEBİLECEL KELİME YA DA İFADEYİ BULUNUZ. Bitcoin is often referred to as a new kind of currency. But it may be better (17)______ of its units as being virtual tokens that have value because enough people believe they do, and there is a finite number of them. (18)______ bitcoin is represented by a unique online registration number. These numbers are created (19)______ a process called "mining" , which involves a computer solving a difficult mathematical problem with a 64-digit solution. Each time a problem is solved, the computer's owner is rewarded with bitcoins. To receive a bitcoin, a user must also have a Bitcoin address - a randomly generated (20)______ of 27 to 34 letters and numbers - which acts as a kind of virtual postbox to and from which the bitcoins are sent. (21)______ there is no registry of these addresses, people can use them to protect their anonymity when making a transaction.
Answer
  • think
  • thinking
  • to think
  • be thought
  • to be thought

Question 18

Question
Bitcoin is often referred to as a new kind of currency. But it may be better (17)______ of its units as being virtual tokens that have value because enough people believe they do, and there is a finite number of them. (18)______ bitcoin is represented by a unique online registration number. These numbers are created (19)______ a process called "mining" , which involves a computer solving a difficult mathematical problem with a 64-digit solution. Each time a problem is solved, the computer's owner is rewarded with bitcoins. To receive a bitcoin, a user must also have a Bitcoin address - a randomly generated (20)______ of 27 to 34 letters and numbers - which acts as a kind of virtual postbox to and from which the bitcoins are sent. (21)______ there is no registry of these addresses, people can use them to protect their anonymity when making a transaction.
Answer
  • Each
  • No
  • Whole
  • Either
  • Another

Question 19

Question
Bitcoin is often referred to as a new kind of currency. But it may be better (17)______ of its units as being virtual tokens that have value because enough people believe they do, and there is a finite number of them. (18)______ bitcoin is represented by a unique online registration number. These numbers are created (19)______ a process called "mining" , which involves a computer solving a difficult mathematical problem with a 64-digit solution. Each time a problem is solved, the computer's owner is rewarded with bitcoins. To receive a bitcoin, a user must also have a Bitcoin address - a randomly generated (20)______ of 27 to 34 letters and numbers - which acts as a kind of virtual postbox to and from which the bitcoins are sent. (21)______ there is no registry of these addresses, people can use them to protect their anonymity when making a transaction.
Answer
  • into
  • from
  • across
  • under
  • through

Question 20

Question
Bitcoin is often referred to as a new kind of currency. But it may be better (17)______ of its units as being virtual tokens that have value because enough people believe they do, and there is a finite number of them. (18)______ bitcoin is represented by a unique online registration number. These numbers are created (19)______ a process called "mining" , which involves a computer solving a difficult mathematical problem with a 64-digit solution. Each time a problem is solved, the computer's owner is rewarded with bitcoins. To receive a bitcoin, a user must also have a Bitcoin address - a randomly generated (20)______ of 27 to 34 letters and numbers - which acts as a kind of virtual postbox to and from which the bitcoins are sent. (21)______ there is no registry of these addresses, people can use them to protect their anonymity when making a transaction.
Answer
  • barter
  • string
  • rail
  • track
  • pursuit

Question 21

Question
Bitcoin is often referred to as a new kind of currency. But it may be better (17)______ of its units as being virtual tokens that have value because enough people believe they do, and there is a finite number of them. (18)______ bitcoin is represented by a unique online registration number. These numbers are created (19)______ a process called "mining" , which involves a computer solving a difficult mathematical problem with a 64-digit solution. Each time a problem is solved, the computer's owner is rewarded with bitcoins. To receive a bitcoin, a user must also have a Bitcoin address - a randomly generated (20)______ of 27 to 34 letters and numbers - which acts as a kind of virtual postbox to and from which the bitcoins are sent. (21)______ there is no registry of these addresses, people can use them to protect their anonymity when making a transaction.
Answer
  • Once
  • Wherever
  • So that
  • Since
  • Though

Question 22

Question
22. - 26. SORULARDA, BOŞLUĞA GELEBİLECEK KELİME YA DA İFADEYİ BULUNUZ. On the eve of the Sochi Winter Games, (22)______ 50 current and former Olympians (23)______ the Russian authorities to repeal recently introduced anti-gay laws and criticised the International Olypmpic Committee and multinational sponsors for not doing more to force them to (24)______. Fifty-two Olympians, with dozens of medals between them and including 12 competitors in Sochi, launched a trenchant criticism of the lack of action to force Vladimir Putin's administration to scale back laws that forbid "gay propaganda" aimed at under-18s and led to a wave of homophobic attacks. The signatories to the so-called "principle six" campaign beliece (25)______ equal rights and equal opportunity for everyone. "The mission is to support all athletes to be (26)______ and be free to be athletes," says the American rower Esther Lofgren, a gold medallist at London 2012.
Answer
  • more than
  • as many
  • much of
  • so many that
  • far more

Question 23

Question
On the eve of the Sochi Winter Games, (22)______ 50 current and former Olympians (23)______ the Russian authorities to repeal recently introduced anti-gay laws and criticised the International Olypmpic Committee and multinational sponsors for not doing more to force them to (24)______. Fifty-two Olympians, with dozens of medals between them and including 12 competitors in Sochi, launched a trenchant criticism of the lack of action to force Vladimir Putin's administration to scale back laws that forbid "gay propaganda" aimed at under-18s and led to a wave of homophobic attacks. The signatories to the so-called "principle six" campaign beliece (25)______ equal rights and equal opportunity for everyone. "The mission is to support all athletes to be (26)______ and be free to be athletes," says the American rower Esther Lofgren, a gold medallist at London 2012.
Answer
  • came up
  • ended in
  • called on
  • headed for
  • made up

Question 24

Question
On the eve of the Sochi Winter Games, (22)______ 50 current and former Olympians (23)______ the Russian authorities to repeal recently introduced anti-gay laws and criticised the International Olypmpic Committee and multinational sponsors for not doing more to force them to (24)______. Fifty-two Olympians, with dozens of medals between them and including 12 competitors in Sochi, launched a trenchant criticism of the lack of action to force Vladimir Putin's administration to scale back laws that forbid "gay propaganda" aimed at under-18s and led to a wave of homophobic attacks. The signatories to the so-called "principle six" campaign beliece (25)______ equal rights and equal opportunity for everyone. "The mission is to support all athletes to be (26)______ and be free to be athletes," says the American rower Esther Lofgren, a gold medallist at London 2012.
Answer
  • doing as
  • do as
  • as do
  • do so
  • so do

Question 25

Question
On the eve of the Sochi Winter Games, (22)______ 50 current and former Olympians (23)______ the Russian authorities to repeal recently introduced anti-gay laws and criticised the International Olypmpic Committee and multinational sponsors for not doing more to force them to (24)______. Fifty-two Olympians, with dozens of medals between them and including 12 competitors in Sochi, launched a trenchant criticism of the lack of action to force Vladimir Putin's administration to scale back laws that forbid "gay propaganda" aimed at under-18s and led to a wave of homophobic attacks. The signatories to the so-called "principle six" campaign beliece (25)______ equal rights and equal opportunity for everyone. "The mission is to support all athletes to be (26)______ and be free to be athletes," says the American rower Esther Lofgren, a gold medallist at London 2012.
Answer
  • at
  • by
  • on
  • beyond
  • in

Question 26

Question
On the eve of the Sochi Winter Games, (22)______ 50 current and former Olympians (23)______ the Russian authorities to repeal recently introduced anti-gay laws and criticised the International Olypmpic Committee and multinational sponsors for not doing more to force them to (24)______. Fifty-two Olympians, with dozens of medals between them and including 12 competitors in Sochi, launched a trenchant criticism of the lack of action to force Vladimir Putin's administration to scale back laws that forbid "gay propaganda" aimed at under-18s and led to a wave of homophobic attacks. The signatories to the so-called "principle six" campaign beliece (25)______ equal rights and equal opportunity for everyone. "The mission is to support all athletes to be (26)______ and be free to be athletes," says the American rower Esther Lofgren, a gold medallist at London 2012.
Answer
  • them
  • theirs
  • they
  • their
  • themselves

Question 27

Question
The UK government's annual funding for flood defences is falling by 15% in real terms, ______.
Answer
  • even though every 100 hectares of land can feed 400 people
  • because people will have to adapt to its increasing flood risk
  • while the risk of flooding is rising as the greatest impact of climate change
  • which is bringing fiercer storms, more intense downpours and is pushing up sea level
  • if large parts of southern England had their wettest January ever recorded

Question 28

Question
______ as sales growth to consumers slowed with mature markets approaching saturation.
Answer
  • The tablet market didn't live up to expectations in the fourth quarter of last year
  • Consumers' eagerness to buy tablets seems unclear
  • Android tablets running Google services made up more than 50% of the market
  • Most of those extra sales last year were in China
  • Microsoft seems so far not to have turned up to the table party in any strenght

Question 29

Question
_____ , as a result of which gourmet dining, private flights, bespoke safaris, slimming clinics and art auctions emerge as top status symbols.
Answer
  • They already have the luxury toys; the cars and the jewellery
  • Of the $1.8tn spent on luxuries last year, an estimated $1tn went on services
  • This sum was the same as the wealth controlled by the world's richest 85 billionaires
  • Other growth areas include fine art and wine
  • Super rich people shift their thrills from luxury goods to costly experiences

Question 30

Question
A room full of students with a tablet each and a teacher with an enthusiasm for social media is all _____.
Answer
  • where they display their work
  • that is required to engage developing minds
  • which the teacher can mark online
  • as it creates a "digitally rich" environment
  • and wi-fi operates throughout the school

Question 31

Question
Protests have disrupted Thailand's general election, _____.
Answer
  • that 89% of polling stations operated normally
  • people coming out to vote to exercise their democratic right
  • halting voting in parts of Bangkok and the South
  • unable to declare a result because of the closures
  • the situation overall being calm

Question 32

Question
For Delhi residents the backdrop of rush-hour traffic is causing noise pollution so serious _____.
Answer
  • where it often feels as quiet as a morgue
  • as lorries race down empty roads closed to them during the day
  • though honking is illegal near schools, hospitals and at intersections
  • that experts are warning of serious health consequences
  • since it causes the onset of age-related deafness 15 years earlier than normal

Question 33

Question
_____ , although Sweden is among the countries with the least problems.
Answer
  • The true cost of corruption was "probably much higher" than 120bn
  • The extent of the corruption problem in Europe is breathtaking
  • There are also high levels of bribery in Poland, Slovakia and Hungary
  • More than half say the level has increased
  • The cost to the EU economy is equivalent to the bloc's annual budget

Question 34

Question
According to a man once close to Gaddafi, there was literally nothing good about the man _____.
Answer
  • whose regime he had served most of his adult life
  • how international sanctions were hurting ordinary Libyans
  • though he was hiding his weakness behind a facade
  • when he failed to set up a "utopia" in Libya
  • unless Gaddafi was his most lucrative client

Question 35

Question
One of the country’s largest drugstore chains plans to stop selling cigarettes and other tobacco products _____.
Answer
  • as it had become more of a health care provider than a largely retail business
  • which include items like chewing gum
  • that cigarettes and providing health care just don’t go together in the same setting
  • unless it proves to be a conflict of interest
  • even though the company stands to lose $2 billion in sales

Question 36

Question
Until recently, farmers in Georgia’s heartland could only dream about high profits _____.
Answer
  • now that plantings of field corn surged to a record 97 million acres
  • because there were so few ways to sell their produce locally
  • where dairy farmers face a host of financial challenges
  • if grocery chains begin promoting the advantages of local produce
  • since it required far more work than growing corn

Question 37

Question
37. – 42. SORULARDA, VERİLEN TÜRKÇE CÜMLENİN İNGİLİZCE, İNGİLİZCE CÜMLENİN TÜRKÇE DENGİNİ BULUNUZ. İyi, verimli tarım toprağına, tarımın başlangıcından beri çok değer verilmektedir, ve Britanyalılar, bataklıkları kurutmak ve sahil şeridi oluşturmak için bin yıl harcamıştır.
Answer
  • Britons have always valued good, fertile farmland and since the very beginning of agriculture, they have spent a millenium to drain marshes and create coastal land.
  • It is good fertile land that has been popular since agriculture was employed and it was Britons that spent a millenium and dried marshes and created coastal land.
  • Good, fertile farmland has been prized since the dawn of agriculture, and Britons have spent a millennium draining marshes and creating coastal land.
  • Ever since mankind started to cultivate the soil, good, fertile land has been much prized and it has taken Britons a millenium to drain marshes so as to create coastal land
  • Marshes and coastal land needs as long as a millenium to transform into good, fertile farmland, the kind valued highly by Britons since the initiation of agriculture.

Question 38

Question
AB dışında yaşayan zengin yabancıların İngiliz evlerini satın almalarını engelleyecek radikal planlar, önde gelen sağ eğilimli bir düşünce kuruluşunun hazırlamış olduğu bir raporda yayınlanacak.
Answer
  • Radical plans to stop rich overseas residents who live outside the EU from buying British houses will be published in a report by a leading rightwing thinktank.
  • A report prepared by a leading rightwing thinktank will be published so that rich overseas residents living outside the EU will not be able to buy British houses.
  • Rich overseas residents living outside the EU will have to report if they want to buy British houses, according to a leading rightwing thinktank.
  • In a report to be published by a leading rightwing thinktank, there will be radical plans aiming to prevent rich EU citizens from residing in British houses overseas.
  • A leading rightwing thinktank is expected to publish a report explaining the radical plans to prevent rich EU citizens abroad from buying British houses.

Question 39

Question
Amerikalı arkadaşlarla konuşurken daima, silah lobisinin karşı konulamayacak kadar güçlü olduğuna ve hiçbir şeyin asla değişmeyeceğine dair bir tür umutsuzluk sezinlerim.
Answer
  • While talking to my American friends, I often feel that the gun lobby is too powerful to overcome and so nothing will ever change, which is depressing.
  • I’ve always gathered from my American friends’ remarks that the gun lobby is so powerful that it cannot be challanged and nothing seems to ever change.
  • Having talked to American friends, I know how strong the gun lobby is and why nothing will ever challange or change it.
  • Talking to American friends, I always sense a kind of despair that the gun lobby is too powerful to challenge and that nothing will ever change.
  • While I am talking to American friends, I can feel that they feel desperate in that the gun lobby is unchallangeable and so everything is bound to stay the same.

Question 40

Question
Expressing concern over the Syrian government's delay in removing chemical weapons materials, the US and Britain have asked Russia to pressure Damascus to comply with the agreement.
Answer
  • Suriye hükümetinin kimyasal silahların yok edilmesindeki yavaşlığı konusunda endişelerini dile getiren ABD ve Britanya, Rusya’dan anlaşmaya uyması için Şam’a baskı yapmasını istedi.
  • Suriye hükümeti kimyasal silahların yok edilmesi konusunda yavaş davranınca, ABD ve Britanya endişelerini dile getirip Rusya’nın Şam’a baskı yapıp anlaşmaya uymasını istedi.
  • Suriye hükümetinin kimyasal silahların yok edilmesi konusunu ertelemesi üzerine endişelerini dile getiren ABD ve Britanya, Rusya’ya başvurarak Şam’ı anlaşmaya uyması için uyarmasını istedi.
  • Kimyasal silahların kaldırılmasını yavaştan alan Suriye hükümeti ABD ve Britanya’yı endişendirmiş ve bu iki ülkenin Rusya’dan Şam hükümetini anlaşmaya uyması için ikna etmesini istemişti.
  • Kimyasal silahları imha etme işini ihmal eden Suriye hükümetinin endişe yaratması üzerine ABD ve Britanya, Rusya’dan Şam’ı anlaşmaya uyması için ikna etmesini istemişti.

Question 41

Question
Statisticians put the deterioration down to several factors, such as a change in the number of hours people work as well as a fall in productivity.
Answer
  • İstatistik uzmanlarına göre, bu kötüye gidişin nedeni, üretimdeki düşüşün yanı sıra insanların çalışma saatlerindeki değişiklik gibi çeşitli faktörler.
  • İstatistik uzmanları, kötüye gidişin nedeni olarak hem üretimdeki düşüşü hem de insanların çalışma saatlerindeki değişiklikleri ileri sürmekteler.
  • İstatistikçilerin dediğine göre, üretimdeki düşüş ile birlikte insanların çalışma saatlerindeki değişiklikler gibi faktörler kötüye gidişin nedeni olabilir.
  • Çeşitli faktörlerin, örneğin üretimin düşmesi ve insanların çalışma saatlerini değiştirmesi, kötüye gidişin nedenleri olabileceği istatistikçilerin ileri sürdüğü nedenler arasındadır.
  • İstatistikçiler, kötüye gidişi üretimdeki düşüşün yanı sıra insanların çalışma sürelerindeki değişiklik gibi çeşitli faktörlere bağlamaktalar.

Question 42

Question
With many people working fewer hours than they would like, there is still plenty of slack in the labour market and only limited potential for wage growth to accelerate.
Answer
  • Pek çok insan istediği kadar çok çalışamadığı için hem piyasalarda büyük bir durgunluk söz konusu, hem de ücret artışlarının canlanması son derece zor.
  • Herkesin istediği kadar çalışamamsı sonucunda piyasa hala durgun ve ücret artışlarının canlanması da çok az bir ihtimal.
  • Pek çok kişi arzu ettiğinden daha az çalıştığı içindir ki iş piyasasında hala büyük bir durgunluk ve ücret artışlarının canlanması için ancak zayıf bir ihtimal mevcut.
  • İnsanların diledikleri gibi çalışamamasının sonucu olarak iş piyasası durgunluğunu sürdürürken ücret artışının yeniden canlanması ihtimali giderek zayıflamakta.
  • Çoğu insan arzu ettiği gibi çalışamamakta, piyasalar durgunluğunu korumakta ve ücret artışının yeniden canlanması ihtimali de giderek azalmakta.

Question 43

Question
43. – 46. SORULARI, AŞAĞIDAKİ PARÇAYA GÖRE CEVAPLAYINIZ. There is brilliance in North Korea's strategy. When the Soviet Union collapsed, North Korea was left in dire economic straits. There were reasonable expectations that its government would soon collapse, leading to the unification of the Korean Peninsula. Naturally, the goal of the North Korean government was regime survival(44)- it was terrified that outside powers would invade or support an uprising against it. It needed a strategy that would dissuade anyone from trying that. Being weak in every sense, this wasn't going to be easy, but the North Koreans developed a strategy that we described more than 10 years ago as ferocious, weak and crazy. North Korea has pursued this course since the 1990s, and the latest manifestation of this strategy was on display last week. The strategy has worked marvelously and is still working. It should also be noted that other countries have learned this ferocious, weak, crazy maneuver from North Korea. Iran is the best pupil. It has convincingly portrayed itself as ferocious via its nuclear program, endlessly and quite publicly pursuing its program without ever quite succeeding. It is also persistently seen as weak, perpetually facing economic crises and enraged gangs of iPod-using youths. Whether Iran can play the weakness card as skillfully as North Korea remains unclear -- Iran just doesn't have the poverty North Korea has. Additionally, Iran's rhetoric at times can certainly be considered crazy: Tehran has carefully cultivated perceptions that it would engage in nuclear war even if this meant the death of all Iranians. Like North Korea, Iran also has managed to retain its form of government and its national sovereignty. Endless predictions of the fall of the Islamic republic to a rising generation have proved false. One learns from the passsage that _____.
Answer
  • Iran is the only country to successfully implement the North Korean strategy
  • North Korea has exported its strategy to survive to several countries
  • worldwide hopes for the two Koreas to unify have totally faded
  • the North Korean strategy has been valid for about a decade now
  • the collapse of the Soviet Union definitely led to a freer North Korea

Question 44

Question
There is brilliance in North Korea's strategy. When the Soviet Union collapsed, North Korea was left in dire economic straits. There were reasonable expectations that its government would soon collapse, leading to the unification of the Korean Peninsula. Naturally, the goal of the North Korean government was regime survival(44)- it was terrified that outside powers would invade or support an uprising against it. It needed a strategy that would dissuade anyone from trying that. Being weak in every sense, this wasn't going to be easy, but the North Koreans developed a strategy that we described more than 10 years ago as ferocious, weak and crazy. North Korea has pursued this course since the 1990s, and the latest manifestation of this strategy was on display last week. The strategy has worked marvelously and is still working. It should also be noted that other countries have learned this ferocious, weak, crazy maneuver from North Korea. Iran is the best pupil. It has convincingly portrayed itself as ferocious via its nuclear program, endlessly and quite publicly pursuing its program without ever quite succeeding. It is also persistently seen as weak, perpetually facing economic crises and enraged gangs of iPod-using youths. Whether Iran can play the weakness card as skillfully as North Korea remains unclear -- Iran just doesn't have the poverty North Korea has. Additionally, Iran's rhetoric at times can certainly be considered crazy: Tehran has carefully cultivated perceptions that it would engage in nuclear war even if this meant the death of all Iranians. Like North Korea, Iran also has managed to retain its form of government and its national sovereignty. Endless predictions of the fall of the Islamic republic to a rising generation have proved false. The writer of the passage _____.
Answer
  • objects to Iran mimicing North Korea in every respect
  • finds the North Korean approach towards Russia natural
  • is of the opinion that Russia should not have collapsed
  • justifies the North Korean government’s move to survive
  • cannot envisage the unification of the peninsula

Question 45

Question
There is brilliance in North Korea's strategy. When the Soviet Union collapsed, North Korea was left in dire economic straits. There were reasonable expectations that its government would soon collapse, leading to the unification of the Korean Peninsula. Naturally, the goal of the North Korean government was regime survival(44)- it was terrified that outside powers would invade or support an uprising against it. It needed a strategy that would dissuade anyone from trying that. Being weak in every sense, this wasn't going to be easy, but the North Koreans developed a strategy that we described more than 10 years ago as ferocious, weak and crazy. North Korea has pursued this course since the 1990s, and the latest manifestation of this strategy was on display last week. The strategy has worked marvelously and is still working. It should also be noted that other countries have learned this ferocious, weak, crazy maneuver from North Korea. Iran is the best pupil. It has convincingly portrayed itself as ferocious via its nuclear program, endlessly and quite publicly pursuing its program without ever quite succeeding. It is also persistently seen as weak, perpetually facing economic crises and enraged gangs of iPod-using youths. Whether Iran can play the weakness card as skillfully as North Korea remains unclear -- Iran just doesn't have the poverty North Korea has. Additionally, Iran's rhetoric at times can certainly be considered crazy: Tehran has carefully cultivated perceptions that it would engage in nuclear war even if this meant the death of all Iranians. Like North Korea, Iran also has managed to retain its form of government and its national sovereignty. Endless predictions of the fall of the Islamic republic to a rising generation have proved false. It is possible to infer from the passage that Iran _____.
Answer
  • is doubtful to succeed in its application of its strategy
  • is not so poor a country, as is North Korea
  • suffers from an ever lasting economic crisis
  • goes on with its nuclear programme at all costs
  • had better pursue a moderate policy with a mild language

Question 46

Question
There is brilliance in North Korea's strategy. When the Soviet Union collapsed, North Korea was left in dire economic straits. There were reasonable expectations that its government would soon collapse, leading to the unification of the Korean Peninsula. Naturally, the goal of the North Korean government was regime survival(44)- it was terrified that outside powers would invade or support an uprising against it. It needed a strategy that would dissuade anyone from trying that. Being weak in every sense, this wasn't going to be easy, but the North Koreans developed a strategy that we described more than 10 years ago as ferocious, weak and crazy. North Korea has pursued this course since the 1990s, and the latest manifestation of this strategy was on display last week. The strategy has worked marvelously and is still working. It should also be noted that other countries have learned this ferocious, weak, crazy maneuver from North Korea. Iran is the best pupil. It has convincingly portrayed itself as ferocious via its nuclear program, endlessly and quite publicly pursuing its program without ever quite succeeding. It is also persistently seen as weak, perpetually facing economic crises and enraged gangs of iPod-using youths. Whether Iran can play the weakness card as skillfully as North Korea remains unclear -- Iran just doesn't have the poverty North Korea has. Additionally, Iran's rhetoric at times can certainly be considered crazy: Tehran has carefully cultivated perceptions that it would engage in nuclear war even if this meant the death of all Iranians. Like North Korea, Iran also has managed to retain its form of government and its national sovereignty. Endless predictions of the fall of the Islamic republic to a rising generation have proved false. According to the passage, the expectation that _____ has not been fulfilled.
Answer
  • North Korea would unite with Russia
  • the Korean peninsula would split further
  • South Korea might break down
  • Iran could trigger a nuclear war
  • the regime in Iran would collapse

Question 47

Question
47. – 50. SORULARI, AŞAĞIDAKİ PARÇAYA GÖRE CEVAPLAYINIZ. Sometimes great minds do think alike. On Tuesday, the Guardian's picture system was bursting with 25,000 images by 5.30pm. I'm sure over at News International, the Times had a similar number or more. But, despite having so many pictures to choose from, both papers had the same rather beautiful picture on their front pages on Wedsnesday. Associated Press photographer Muhammed Muheisen shot the picture, a portrait of Iaiba Hazrat, six, a refugee from Afghanistan living in a slum in Islamabad. It was from a series of 21 portraits of Iaiba and other refugee children all shot in Muheisen's quiet, direct, artless style. He seems to have a natural rapport with his subjects and he is one of our favourite contributors from that part of the world, documenting the poorer people, on most occasions children; who are sometimes playing or often working, but trying to have a childhood. The Times picture desk obviously feel the same about him, but still it seems extraordinary that both picture editors chose the same picture out of the set: a dirty-faced girl with red hair. Guardian picture editor, Fiona Shields says, "We chose that child for the extraordinary depth of expression in her eyes." In these, as in most of Muheisen's images, the main subject is looking straight at the camera, at the viewer, making it so hard to ignore their " plight. " But among so many pictures, good photography shines out, as always. Which of the following points is emphasized in the passage?
Answer
  • A quality photo is always noticeable
  • Photography is an art form
  • All papers use the same photos
  • Taking photos is not always fun
  • Refugees always make a good theme

Question 48

Question
Sometimes great minds do think alike. On Tuesday, the Guardian's picture system was bursting with 25,000 images by 5.30pm. I'm sure over at News International, the Times had a similar number or more. But, despite having so many pictures to choose from, both papers had the same rather beautiful picture on their front pages on Wedsnesday. Associated Press photographer Muhammed Muheisen shot the picture, a portrait of Iaiba Hazrat, six, a refugee from Afghanistan living in a slum in Islamabad. It was from a series of 21 portraits of Iaiba and other refugee children all shot in Muheisen's quiet, direct, artless style. He seems to have a natural rapport with his subjects and he is one of our favourite contributors from that part of the world, documenting the poorer people, on most occasions children; who are sometimes playing or often working, but trying to have a childhood. The Times picture desk obviously feel the same about him, but still it seems extraordinary that both picture editors chose the same picture out of the set: a dirty-faced girl with red hair. Guardian picture editor, Fiona Shields says, "We chose that child for the extraordinary depth of expression in her eyes." In these, as in most of Muheisen's images, the main subject is looking straight at the camera, at the viewer, making it so hard to ignore their " plight. " But among so many pictures, good photography shines out, as always. According to the writer of the passage, _____.
Answer
  • Iaiba Hazrat has been Muheisen’s subject several times
  • Muhammed Muheisen is a globe trotter as well as a photographer
  • Muheisen’s simple style and affinity for people makes his art great
  • Afghanistan is a natural plato for political photographers
  • beautiful suffering children have always drawn attention

Question 49

Question
Sometimes great minds do think alike. On Tuesday, the Guardian's picture system was bursting with 25,000 images by 5.30pm. I'm sure over at News International, the Times had a similar number or more. But, despite having so many pictures to choose from, both papers had the same rather beautiful picture on their front pages on Wedsnesday. Associated Press photographer Muhammed Muheisen shot the picture, a portrait of Iaiba Hazrat, six, a refugee from Afghanistan living in a slum in Islamabad. It was from a series of 21 portraits of Iaiba and other refugee children all shot in Muheisen's quiet, direct, artless style. He seems to have a natural rapport with his subjects and he is one of our favourite contributors from that part of the world, documenting the poorer people, on most occasions children; who are sometimes playing or often working, but trying to have a childhood. The Times picture desk obviously feel the same about him, but still it seems extraordinary that both picture editors chose the same picture out of the set: a dirty-faced girl with red hair. Guardian picture editor, Fiona Shields says, "We chose that child for the extraordinary depth of expression in her eyes." In these, as in most of Muheisen's images, the main subject is looking straight at the camera, at the viewer, making it so hard to ignore their " plight. " But among so many pictures, good photography shines out, as always. According to the passage, one common feature of Mueisen’s subjects is that _____.
Answer
  • they are all immigrants
  • their suffering is so obvious
  • the children are orphans
  • violence is condemned
  • they look blank

Question 50

Question
Sometimes great minds do think alike. On Tuesday, the Guardian's picture system was bursting with 25,000 images by 5.30pm. I'm sure over at News International, the Times had a similar number or more. But, despite having so many pictures to choose from, both papers had the same rather beautiful picture on their front pages on Wedsnesday. Associated Press photographer Muhammed Muheisen shot the picture, a portrait of Iaiba Hazrat, six, a refugee from Afghanistan living in a slum in Islamabad. It was from a series of 21 portraits of Iaiba and other refugee children all shot in Muheisen's quiet, direct, artless style. He seems to have a natural rapport with his subjects and he is one of our favourite contributors from that part of the world, documenting the poorer people, on most occasions children; who are sometimes playing or often working, but trying to have a childhood. The Times picture desk obviously feel the same about him, but still it seems extraordinary that both picture editors chose the same picture out of the set: a dirty-faced girl with red hair. Guardian picture editor, Fiona Shields says, "We chose that child for the extraordinary depth of expression in her eyes." In these, as in most of Muheisen's images, the main subject is looking straight at the camera, at the viewer, making it so hard to ignore their " plight. " But among so many pictures, good photography shines out, as always. The underlined word “plight” is closest in meaning to _____.
Answer
  • desires
  • memories
  • risk
  • distress
  • needs

Question 51

Question
51. – 54. SORULARI, AŞAĞIDAKİ PARÇAYA GÖRE CEVAPLAYINIZ. This year Coca-Cola outdid itself. In most ways its commercial couldn't be less original. It begins with a man in a cowboy hat on a horse and ends with children running towards the Grand Canyon, all to the words of America the Beautiful. In between, people of various hues, regions and settings – in cities and on prairies, in yarmulkes and headscarves – eat popcorn, ice-skate, blow bubblegum, surf and dance. Were it not for the gay dads, it would be indistinguishable from the official videos the US state department shows you while you're waiting in immigration – all the diversity and none of the discrimination. There is just one twist. The song is sung in nine different languages: English, Spanish, Tagalog, Mandarin, Hindi, Hebrew, Keres, French and Arabic. For this – and this alone – American conservative intellectuals threw a spectacular antagonism. "If we cannot be proud enough as a country to sing America the Beautiful in English," said former congressman Allen West, " we are on the road to catastrophe." Fox commentator Todd Starnes tweeted: "Coca-Cola is the official soft drink of illegals crossing the border." Another angry viewer tweeted: "Nice to see that Coke likes to sing an American song in the terrorist's language." The "road to catastrophe" is paved by clowns like these. But progressives have little reason to feel self-satisfied. The last thing we need is diversity being defined by Coca-Cola – a multinational corporation that has been accused of human rights, labour and environmental abuses on several continents (allegations the company denies). The writer is of the opinion that _____.
Answer
  • Coca-Cola is in no way entitled to descibe diversity
  • Coca-Cola is a reputable multinational company
  • America is now virtually free from discrimination
  • there are several official languages spoken in America
  • racial discrimination is prevalent in southern states

Question 52

Question
This year Coca-Cola outdid itself. In most ways its commercial couldn't be less original. It begins with a man in a cowboy hat on a horse and ends with children running towards the Grand Canyon, all to the words of America the Beautiful. In between, people of various hues, regions and settings – in cities and on prairies, in yarmulkes and headscarves – eat popcorn, ice-skate, blow bubblegum, surf and dance. Were it not for the gay dads, it would be indistinguishable from the official videos the US state department shows you while you're waiting in immigration – all the diversity and none of the discrimination. There is just one twist. The song is sung in nine different languages: English, Spanish, Tagalog, Mandarin, Hindi, Hebrew, Keres, French and Arabic. For this – and this alone – American conservative intellectuals threw a spectacular antagonism. "If we cannot be proud enough as a country to sing America the Beautiful in English," said former congressman Allen West, " we are on the road to catastrophe." Fox commentator Todd Starnes tweeted: "Coca-Cola is the official soft drink of illegals crossing the border." Another angry viewer tweeted: "Nice to see that Coke likes to sing an American song in the terrorist's language." The "road to catastrophe" is paved by clowns like these. But progressives have little reason to feel self-satisfied. The last thing we need is diversity being defined by Coca-Cola – a multinational corporation that has been accused of human rights, labour and environmental abuses on several continents (allegations the company denies). We learn from the passage that _____.
Answer
  • Coca-Cola is the favouite drink of the minorities in America
  • people from all walks of life are vulnerable to discrimination
  • the Coke ad looked like the government’s videos except that it included gay fathers
  • laws allow America the Beautiful to be sung only in English
  • Coke can be traded over the border duty free

Question 53

Question
This year Coca-Cola outdid itself. In most ways its commercial couldn't be less original. It begins with a man in a cowboy hat on a horse and ends with children running towards the Grand Canyon, all to the words of America the Beautiful. In between, people of various hues, regions and settings – in cities and on prairies, in yarmulkes and headscarves – eat popcorn, ice-skate, blow bubblegum, surf and dance. Were it not for the gay dads, it would be indistinguishable from the official videos the US state department shows you while you're waiting in immigration – all the diversity and none of the discrimination. There is just one twist. The song is sung in nine different languages: English, Spanish, Tagalog, Mandarin, Hindi, Hebrew, Keres, French and Arabic. For this – and this alone – American conservative intellectuals threw a spectacular antagonism. "If we cannot be proud enough as a country to sing America the Beautiful in English," said former congressman Allen West, " we are on the road to catastrophe." Fox commentator Todd Starnes tweeted: "Coca-Cola is the official soft drink of illegals crossing the border." Another angry viewer tweeted: "Nice to see that Coke likes to sing an American song in the terrorist's language." The "road to catastrophe" is paved by clowns like these. But progressives have little reason to feel self-satisfied. The last thing we need is diversity being defined by Coca-Cola – a multinational corporation that has been accused of human rights, labour and environmental abuses on several continents (allegations the company denies). It is clearly stated in the passage that conventionalists _____.
Answer
  • find America the Beautiful too chauvinist to be sung, especially by children
  • fiercely opposed singing America the Beautiful in a language other than English
  • resist the idea that Coca-Cola should be involved in politics
  • regard the immigrants in the USA as terrorists
  • accuse Coca-Cola company of being racist

Question 54

Question
This year Coca-Cola outdid itself. In most ways its commercial couldn't be less original. It begins with a man in a cowboy hat on a horse and ends with children running towards the Grand Canyon, all to the words of America the Beautiful. In between, people of various hues, regions and settings – in cities and on prairies, in yarmulkes and headscarves – eat popcorn, ice-skate, blow bubblegum, surf and dance. Were it not for the gay dads, it would be indistinguishable from the official videos the US state department shows you while you're waiting in immigration – all the diversity and none of the discrimination. There is just one twist. The song is sung in nine different languages: English, Spanish, Tagalog, Mandarin, Hindi, Hebrew, Keres, French and Arabic. For this – and this alone – American conservative intellectuals threw a spectacular antagonism. "If we cannot be proud enough as a country to sing America the Beautiful in English," said former congressman Allen West, " we are on the road to catastrophe." Fox commentator Todd Starnes tweeted: "Coca-Cola is the official soft drink of illegals crossing the border." Another angry viewer tweeted: "Nice to see that Coke likes to sing an American song in the terrorist's language." The "road to catastrophe" is paved by clowns like these. But progressives have little reason to feel self-satisfied. The last thing we need is diversity being defined by Coca-Cola – a multinational corporation that has been accused of human rights, labour and environmental abuses on several continents (allegations the company denies). According to the writer of the passage, _____.
Answer
  • Coca-Cola is bound to be charged for violating human rights in the Far-East
  • a soft drink cannot be seen as the official drink of a country
  • the Coca-Cola commercial was appreciated for being original
  • US state department’s video focuses on both diversity and discrimination
  • it is the conservatives themselves taking the country to disaster

Question 55

Question
55. – 58. SORULARI, AŞAĞIDAKİ PARÇAYA GÖRE CEVAPLAYINIZ. Video games often make us feel real emotions for non-player characters (NPCs), so much so that we sometimes feel like we have a real relationship with them. Ellie from The Last of Us is a strong example of this. By the end of that game I cared about what happened to her, hated seeing her endangered, and wanted to see things turn out well for her. All this despite the fact that she didn’t even know I existed, much less give a flip about me. Granted, this isn’t new or unique to video games. The Greeks were making audiences react to plays full of actors thousands of years ago. But I think video games are unique among different kinds of media in their ability to create these kinds of characters and relationships and Ellie is emblematic of that. To understand why, let’s look at a concept that communications and psychology researchers call “parasocial relationships.” In the 1950s, social psychologists became interested in how people relate to characters, news anchors, and variety show hosts that they saw on television. The term “parasocial relationship” was made famous in a 1956 paper by Donald Horton and Richard Wohl, in which they explored the phenomenon of people relating to TV characters as if they knew each other. They noted that if a person had such a relationship with a television figure, he/she was more likely to be engaged in the show, trust the person more, and genuinely felt intimacy with him/her. According to the passage, _____.
Answer
  • spectators are reluctant to relate to evil characters
  • the more educated people are, the less they have to do with soap operas
  • men, unlike women, have rarely credited fictional heros
  • people have always enjoyed associating themselves with, say, actors
  • actors/actresses are are said to be successful if they can captivate spectators

Question 56

Question
Video games often make us feel real emotions for non-player characters (NPCs), so much so that we sometimes feel like we have a real relationship with them. Ellie from The Last of Us is a strong example of this. By the end of that game I cared about what happened to her, hated seeing her endangered, and wanted to see things turn out well for her. All this despite the fact that she didn’t even know I existed, much less give a flip about me. Granted, this isn’t new or unique to video games. The Greeks were making audiences react to plays full of actors thousands of years ago. But I think video games are unique among different kinds of media in their ability to create these kinds of characters and relationships and Ellie is emblematic of that. To understand why, let’s look at a concept that communications and psychology researchers call “parasocial relationships.” In the 1950s, social psychologists became interested in how people relate to characters, news anchors, and variety show hosts that they saw on television. The term “parasocial relationship” was made famous in a 1956 paper by Donald Horton and Richard Wohl, in which they explored the phenomenon of people relating to TV characters as if they knew each other. They noted that if a person had such a relationship with a television figure, he/she was more likely to be engaged in the show, trust the person more, and genuinely felt intimacy with him/her. One learns from the passage that _____.
Answer
  • those under the spotlights have always sought to meet their fans
  • both famous characters and their followers are for emotional intimacy
  • people are getting more and more involved in relationships with TV characters
  • Ellie gets too involved in the fictional figures of video games
  • affinity with a TV personality means confidence in that person and his work

Question 57

Question
Video games often make us feel real emotions for non-player characters (NPCs), so much so that we sometimes feel like we have a real relationship with them. Ellie from The Last of Us is a strong example of this. By the end of that game I cared about what happened to her, hated seeing her endangered, and wanted to see things turn out well for her. All this despite the fact that she didn’t even know I existed, much less give a flip about me. Granted, this isn’t new or unique to video games. The Greeks were making audiences react to plays full of actors thousands of years ago. But I think video games are unique among different kinds of media in their ability to create these kinds of characters and relationships and Ellie is emblematic of that. To understand why, let’s look at a concept that communications and psychology researchers call “parasocial relationships.” In the 1950s, social psychologists became interested in how people relate to characters, news anchors, and variety show hosts that they saw on television. The term “parasocial relationship” was made famous in a 1956 paper by Donald Horton and Richard Wohl, in which they explored the phenomenon of people relating to TV characters as if they knew each other. They noted that if a person had such a relationship with a television figure, he/she was more likely to be engaged in the show, trust the person more, and genuinely felt intimacy with him/her. The writer of the passage _____.
Answer
  • confesses that he himself felt intimacy with an NPC
  • is surprised at the way Greek actors motivated the spectators
  • prefers playing video games to watching TV shows or films
  • finds video game characters more realistic than TV hosts
  • refuses to accept the fact that Ellie did not care for him

Question 58

Question
Video games often make us feel real emotions for non-player characters (NPCs), so much so that we sometimes feel like we have a real relationship with them. Ellie from The Last of Us is a strong example of this. By the end of that game I cared about what happened to her, hated seeing her endangered, and wanted to see things turn out well for her. All this despite the fact that she didn’t even know I existed, much less give a flip about me. Granted, this isn’t new or unique to video games. The Greeks were making audiences react to plays full of actors thousands of years ago. But I think video games are unique among different kinds of media in their ability to create these kinds of characters and relationships and Ellie is emblematic of that. To understand why, let’s look at a concept that communications and psychology researchers call “parasocial relationships.” In the 1950s, social psychologists became interested in how people relate to characters, news anchors, and variety show hosts that they saw on television. The term “parasocial relationship” was made famous in a 1956 paper by Donald Horton and Richard Wohl, in which they explored the phenomenon of people relating to TV characters as if they knew each other. They noted that if a person had such a relationship with a television figure, he/she was more likely to be engaged in the show, trust the person more, and genuinely felt intimacy with him/her. What does the passage mainly focus on?
Answer
  • Scholars’ heavy reliance on psychologists in communications
  • People’s obsession with NPCs, past and present
  • TV’s contribution to “parasocial relationships”
  • How the term “parasocial relationships” was coined
  • Horton and Wohl’s approach to involvement in NPCs

Question 59

Question
59. – 62. SORULARI, AŞAĞIDAKİ PARÇAYA GÖRE CEVAPLAYINIZ. A satirical novel that follows a bemused Hitler on a journey through today’s Germany is a publishing sensation. But is the dictator responsible for the horrors of the Third Reich a fitting subject for comedy? It is an unlikely premise for a German novel: Hitler returns to Berlin and gets mistaken for a look-alike. After nearly seventy years in a coma, he is surprised by the way the modern city looks. Where have all the Russian soldiers gone? And why are there so many cyclists wearing flimsy helmets with holes in them? He looks for his favourite newspaper, the People’s Observer, but it doesn’t seem to be on the stand – only Turkish papers. The shop owner befriends him and lets him in: “Don’t steal anything, OK?” “Do I look like a criminal?” “You look like Hitler”. “Exactly”, responds the Führer. Eventually, Hitler gets into the swing of the modern world and becomes a celebrity and a politician. He goes on a chat-show (hosted by a German of Turkish background) and goes into politics, striking a popular chord with his proposals to get tough on dog mess. It is a story which has captivated Germany. Er ist wieder da (He’s back) has already sold 400,000 copies. The audio version, too, is a best-seller. Translations into 28 languages are on the way. So is a film. But this is difficult territory. Hitler as a buffoon is a joke as old as Charlie Chaplin. But Hitler as a human being also makes many uneasy. The reviewer, Cornelia Fiedler, of the Süddeutsche Zeitung, attributed the book’s success not to its literary quality but to an unsettling obsession with Hitler. “A very strange fixation on Hitler has developed in Germany and it has something of the manic about it. The focus on Hitler – be it as a comic figure or as the embodiment of evil – risks washing away the historical reality”. According to the passage, _____.
Answer
  • German people still do love their führer
  • Er ist wieder da (He’s back) has taken off in Germany
  • Hitler was always a leader with humour
  • comedies featuring Hitler are regularly produced
  • Hitler was someone who could take criticism

Question 60

Question
A satirical novel that follows a bemused Hitler on a journey through today’s Germany is a publishing sensation. But is the dictator responsible for the horrors of the Third Reich a fitting subject for comedy? It is an unlikely premise for a German novel: Hitler returns to Berlin and gets mistaken for a look-alike. After nearly seventy years in a coma, he is surprised by the way the modern city looks. Where have all the Russian soldiers gone? And why are there so many cyclists wearing flimsy helmets with holes in them? He looks for his favourite newspaper, the People’s Observer, but it doesn’t seem to be on the stand – only Turkish papers. The shop owner befriends him and lets him in: “Don’t steal anything, OK?” “Do I look like a criminal?” “You look like Hitler”. “Exactly”, responds the Führer. Eventually, Hitler gets into the swing of the modern world and becomes a celebrity and a politician. He goes on a chat-show (hosted by a German of Turkish background) and goes into politics, striking a popular chord with his proposals to get tough on dog mess. It is a story which has captivated Germany. Er ist wieder da (He’s back) has already sold 400,000 copies. The audio version, too, is a best-seller. Translations into 28 languages are on the way. So is a film. But this is difficult territory. Hitler as a buffoon is a joke as old as Charlie Chaplin. But Hitler as a human being also makes many uneasy. The reviewer, Cornelia Fiedler, of the Süddeutsche Zeitung, attributed the book’s success not to its literary quality but to an unsettling obsession with Hitler. “A very strange fixation on Hitler has developed in Germany and it has something of the manic about it. The focus on Hitler – be it as a comic figure or as the embodiment of evil – risks washing away the historical reality”. The writer sets out to _____.
Answer
  • show why most Germans respect Hitler after all those years
  • disprove the claim that Hitler had a dull personality
  • find out whether Hitler is the right comedy subject
  • verify all the satire revolving around Hitler
  • make people aware of one thing: Hitler cannot and should not be forgiven

Question 61

Question
A satirical novel that follows a bemused Hitler on a journey through today’s Germany is a publishing sensation. But is the dictator responsible for the horrors of the Third Reich a fitting subject for comedy? It is an unlikely premise for a German novel: Hitler returns to Berlin and gets mistaken for a look-alike. After nearly seventy years in a coma, he is surprised by the way the modern city looks. Where have all the Russian soldiers gone? And why are there so many cyclists wearing flimsy helmets with holes in them? He looks for his favourite newspaper, the People’s Observer, but it doesn’t seem to be on the stand – only Turkish papers. The shop owner befriends him and lets him in: “Don’t steal anything, OK?” “Do I look like a criminal?” “You look like Hitler”. “Exactly”, responds the Führer. Eventually, Hitler gets into the swing of the modern world and becomes a celebrity and a politician. He goes on a chat-show (hosted by a German of Turkish background) and goes into politics, striking a popular chord with his proposals to get tough on dog mess. It is a story which has captivated Germany. Er ist wieder da (He’s back) has already sold 400,000 copies. The audio version, too, is a best-seller. Translations into 28 languages are on the way. So is a film. But this is difficult territory. Hitler as a buffoon is a joke as old as Charlie Chaplin. But Hitler as a human being also makes many uneasy. The reviewer, Cornelia Fiedler, of the Süddeutsche Zeitung, attributed the book’s success not to its literary quality but to an unsettling obsession with Hitler. “A very strange fixation on Hitler has developed in Germany and it has something of the manic about it. The focus on Hitler – be it as a comic figure or as the embodiment of evil – risks washing away the historical reality”. According to one critic, _____.
Answer
  • Er ist wieder da owes its fame to people’s preoccupation with Hitler
  • the staged comedy is of paramount literary quality
  • Hitler can in no way be compared to Charlie Chaplin
  • the Germans have a unique sense of humor in all circumstances
  • political leaders have always been a good source of mockery

Question 62

Question
A satirical novel that follows a bemused Hitler on a journey through today’s Germany is a publishing sensation. But is the dictator responsible for the horrors of the Third Reich a fitting subject for comedy? It is an unlikely premise for a German novel: Hitler returns to Berlin and gets mistaken for a look-alike. After nearly seventy years in a coma, he is surprised by the way the modern city looks. Where have all the Russian soldiers gone? And why are there so many cyclists wearing flimsy helmets with holes in them? He looks for his favourite newspaper, the People’s Observer, but it doesn’t seem to be on the stand – only Turkish papers. The shop owner befriends him and lets him in: “Don’t steal anything, OK?” “Do I look like a criminal?” “You look like Hitler”. “Exactly”, responds the Führer. Eventually, Hitler gets into the swing of the modern world and becomes a celebrity and a politician. He goes on a chat-show (hosted by a German of Turkish background) and goes into politics, striking a popular chord with his proposals to get tough on dog mess. It is a story which has captivated Germany. Er ist wieder da (He’s back) has already sold 400,000 copies. The audio version, too, is a best-seller. Translations into 28 languages are on the way. So is a film. But this is difficult territory. Hitler as a buffoon is a joke as old as Charlie Chaplin. But Hitler as a human being also makes many uneasy. The reviewer, Cornelia Fiedler, of the Süddeutsche Zeitung, attributed the book’s success not to its literary quality but to an unsettling obsession with Hitler. “A very strange fixation on Hitler has developed in Germany and it has something of the manic about it. The focus on Hitler – be it as a comic figure or as the embodiment of evil – risks washing away the historical reality”. Which of the following points is true according to the passage?
Answer
  • There are those that oppose Hitler’s being ridiculed.
  • Cornelia Fiedler is now a great fan of Hitler.
  • Hitler’s image as a leader overwhelms facts about him.
  • Obsession with strong leaders is common across the world.
  • The stage version of the book lacks humor.

Question 63

Question
63. – 67. SORULARDA, KARŞILIKLI KONUŞMALARDA BOŞ BIRAKILAN YERE GELEBİLECEK İFADEYİ BULUNUZ. James: Is it true that pedestrians have been causing too many accidents and deaths in central Los Angeles? Taylor: It is. _____ James: Usually laws have no teeth. What is the situation like here? Taylor: Getting better! Late last year, police began a concerted effort to enforce the rules, fines ranging from $190-$250.
Answer
  • The idea of being fined for crossing the road at the wrong place bemuses foreign visitors to the US.
  • The origins of so-called jaywalking lie in a propaganda campaign by the motor industry in the 1920s.
  • That’s why the Vehicle Code forbids crossing between controlled intersections.
  • Enforcement of anti-jaywalking laws in the US is sporadic.
  • But jaywalking remains illegal across the country, and has been so for many decades.

Question 64

Question
Rita: Oh, you’re back! What was the exhibition like? Was it worth going? Sue: Well, George W. Bush is admittedly "not a great painter", but he's not bad. There are more than 24 portraits of world leaders he met during his presidency. Rita: _____ Sue: I believe with each new brushstroke he seems to be softening his public image. This gives him a chance to be seen in a different light.
Answer
  • He got to know the family details of international leaders.
  • Did he serve one or two terms of office?
  • He says his inspiration came from his great hero, Sir Winston Churchill.
  • Are there artifacts, photographs and personal reflections as well?
  • Many are surprised. Some are even surprised that he can read.

Question 65

Question
Nick: Here it writes “Producing something functional for the blind isn't enough”. Tony: Does that mean blind people mind what something looks like, even though they can't see? Nick: It does. _____ But that seems to be wrong. Tony: I had that misconception, too. I never thought that visually impaired people could be, say, fashion-conscious.
Answer
  • Fashionable brands have long dominated the sportswear market.
  • But it's mostly being bought by sighted people.
  • We assume that blind people care only about function.
  • Sighted people choose their, say, watches as much as a fashion statement as for merely telling the time.
  • But up to now few have specifically targeted disability fashion.

Question 66

Question
Leo: Have you updated your login details? Bruce: No! Should I do so? Leo: That’s what security experts suggest. A Finnish security company revealed that a security flaw had existed in OpenSSL for more than two years. Bruce: That’s too bad! _____. Thanks for the warning.
Answer
  • You can use a word or phrase that you can easily remember but where characters are substituted.
  • But changing your password is very easy. So it's not a bad idea.
  • I think there is a low to medium risk.
  • It would be an overreaction to say everyone should drop what they are doing to reset all their passwords.
  • If attackers made copies of the keys, they could steal the names and passwords of people using the services.

Question 67

Question
Brandon: Isn’t it amazing that some members of the European Parliament have held a rap battle to engage youth voters in forthcoming elections? Joshua: Very clever! I watched them in the news last night. There were four teams of MPs, each of which represented a different party. Brandon: _____ Joshua: Oh, yes! "Vote for the EPP if you want money!" said the European People's Party, while the Greens rebutted: "It's not all about money, it's real political decisions."
Answer
  • Voter turnout in European elections must have been decreasing.
  • And they discussed issues that matter to young Europeans through rap!
  • The European elections are due to be held next month-between the 22-25th, to be exact
  • Just 43% of people turned out for the poll last time, if I remember correctly.
  • They’d better mention issues like Europe's borders and migration, or innovation and technology.

Question 68

Question
68. – 71. SORULARDA, VERİLEN İNGİLİZCE CÜMLENİN İNGİLİZCE DENGİNİ BULUNUZ. For all the added work, growing fruits and vegetables is incredibly rewarding in ways other than profits.
Answer
  • Despite the fact that it requires additional work, the fruit and vegetable business is profitable in every way you can think of.
  • It is very much a lucrative business to grow fruits and vegetables; in addition, it is a challenging activity one can get involved in.
  • Growing fruits and vegetables, in addition to being a profitable business, is amazingly satisfying even though it brings extra work.
  • If you do not mind doing additional work, you can go into the fruits and vegetables business, a worthwhile venture in several aspects.
  • Growing fruits and vegetables is worth doing in that it is profitable, but not worth doing because it calls for a lot of extra work.

Question 69

Question
Nut crops and almonds particularly have risen in value as the world has realised the nutritional value of eating almonds.
Answer
  • The significance of nut crops, for instance that of almonds, has risen parallel to the increase in people’s appreciation of their nutritional value.
  • Nut crops, including almonds, have great nutritional value, which puts up the demand by people who grasp their role in their diet.
  • Apprehending how nutrituous nut crops like almonds are, people consume more of them, not minding the rising prices.
  • The more we recognize the nutrituous side of nut crops such as almonds, the more we esteem them, of course.
  • Since we have become aware of how nutritious almonds are, the worth of nut crops, and especially that of almonds, has gone up.

Question 70

Question
No one nation deserves all responsibility for the outbreak of World War I, but Germany seems to me to deserve it the most.
Answer
  • It is impossible to charge any nation with the responsibility for the beginning of World War I but Germany.
  • The onset of the First World War cannot be inflicted on one nation only; however, I feel that it is Germany to blame the most.
  • Put the blame on Germany for the outbreak of the First World War, not on any other nation. That’s what I think you should do.
  • As far as I am concerned, no nation should be criticized for having started World War I, but as for Germany, it is different.
  • It is obvious to me that World War I broke out because of several nations, one of which is Germany.

Question 71

Question
Trade with China has been harmed by a British visa regime that makes foreign businessmen and visitors feel unwelcome.
Answer
  • Foreign businessmen and visitors are made to feel rejected by the visa policy of Britain, which has crippled trade with China.
  • As a result of the ruined trade with China, foreign businessman and visitors are led to think that they are not accepted in Britain.
  • Chinese businessman and visitors to Britain have begun to think that they are dispensible and that this has led to the new visa regime damaging trade.
  • The new British visa regime is what has made Chinese businessmen and visitors feel offended and suspend trade unilaterally.
  • If it had not been for the visa policy recently imposed by Britain, trade with China would have continued as businessmen and visitors would not have felt rejected.

Question 72

Question
72. – 75. SORULARDA, PARAGRAFTA BOŞ BIRAKILAN YERE GELEBİLECEK CÜMLEYİ BULUNUZ. This much we know, and salute: contemporary feminism is shaped, and led, by younger women. Brilliantly so. _____ Surely when it comes to rank gender-based injustice, not to mention those subtly accumulating inequalities that are so hard to unpick, it is older women tweeting up a storm or charging down Whitehall in furious protest. Why is there not more collective or popular protest?
Answer
  • Far more boil with fury round a kitchen table but stay resolutely silent in public.
  • But middle-aged women are far, far worse.
  • But here's the part that really puzzles and irks me, particularly as I get older.
  • Women put their unpaid labour into families but come out with less money, diminished social status and greater self-doubt.
  • We all know the media hunger for young, telegenic, attractive faces.

Question 73

Question
In one of the most dangerous regions of the planet, against all odds, a huge yet mysterious population of chimpanzees appears to be thriving – for now. Harboured by the remote and pristine forests in the north of the Democratic Republic of Congo and on the border of the Central African Republic, the chimps were completely unknown until recently – _____ But researchers who trekked thousands of kilometres through uncharted territory and dodged armed poachers and rogue militia, now believe the group are one of the last thriving chimp "mega-cultures".
Answer
  • we estimate many thousands of individuals, perhaps tens of thousands.
  • but we did not catch a single film of a human.
  • the area at great risk of being opened up.
  • apart from the local legends of giant apes that ate lions and howled at the moon.
  • both official security forces and militia are the source of much of the danger.

Question 74

Question
Software is becoming a critical layer of all our lives. It is the language of our world. In the future, not knowing the language of computers will be as challenging as being illiterate or innumerate are today. Will every job in the future involve programming? No. But it is still crucial that every child learn to code. _____ it is about promoting computational thinking. Computational thinking is how software engineers solve problems. It combines mathematics, logic and algorithms, and teaches you a new way to think about the world. It teaches you how to tackle large problems by breaking them down into a sequence of smaller, more manageable problems. It involves creating models of the real world, and focussing on the most pertinent aspects. It helps you go from specific solutions to general ones.
Answer
  • In a few weeks you will be able to build useful applications and websites;
  • In the last few years, the UK has finally woken up to the importance of coding;
  • The next generation’s world will be even more online and digital;
  • The education system largely ignored the explosive growth of computing and the internet;
  • This is not primarily about equipping the next generation to work as software engineers;

Question 75

Question
Tesla said it. Einstein agreed. Science proved it. It is a known fact that everything—including our own bodies—is made up of energy vibrating at different frequencies. That being said, can sound frequencies affect us? They sure can. Frequencies affect frequencies; _____ The way frequencies affect the physical world has been demonstrated through various experiments such as the science of Cymatics and water memory.
Answer
  • but it directly alters the vibration of matter.
  • much like mixing ingredients with other ingredients affects the overall flavor of a meal.
  • how our own intentions can even alter the material world.
  • not to mention our bodies are estimated to be about 70% water.
  • so let us bring our attention to the frequency of the music we listen to.

Question 76

Question
76. – 80. SORULARDA, PARAGRAFIN ANLAM BÜTÜNLÜĞÜNÜ BOZAN CÜMLEYİ BULUNUZ. (I) An analysis of a Neanderthal's fossilised hyoid bone - a horseshoe-shaped structure in the neck - suggests the species had the ability to speak. (II) This has been suspected since the 1989 discovery of a Neanderthal hyoid that looks just like a modern human's. (III) But now computer modelling of how it works has shown this bone was also used in a very similar way. (IV) Scientists say the study is "highly suggestive" of complex speech in Neanderthals - the hyoid bone, crucial for speaking, supports the root of the tongue. (V) Neanderthals were stockier and shorter than modern humans, with no chin and backwards sloping foreheads.
Answer
  • I
  • II
  • III
  • IV
  • V

Question 77

Question
(I) A book no bigger than a grain of rice is part of a new exhibition of miniature books at the National Library of Scotland in Edinburgh. (II) Old King Cole, published in 1985 by the Gleniffer Press in Paisley, measures only 0.9mm in height. (III) It held the world record for the smallest printed book, for 20 years. (IV) Scotland has been an important centre of miniature book production since the 19th century. (V) It is one of about 85 miniature books from the library's collections which will be displayed to the public for free until 17 November.
Answer
  • I
  • II
  • III
  • IV
  • V

Question 78

Question
(I) Childhood obesity is a serious medical condition that affects children and adolescents. (II) It occurs when a child is well above the normal weight for his or her age and height. (III) One of the best strategies to reduce childhood obesity is to improve the diet and exercise habits of your entire family. (IV) Childhood obesity is particularly troubling because the extra kilos often cause children to be on the path to health problems that were once confined to adults, such as diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol. (V) Childhood obesity can also lead to poor self-esteem and depression.
Answer
  • I
  • II
  • III
  • IV
  • V

Question 79

Question
(I) Many mothers are under so much pressure to appear like perfect parents that they cover up how much television their children watch or what they cook their families. (II) Mums need to be more honest with each other. (III) Such "white lies" also extend to how much "quality time" they spend with their children. (IV) They often make each other feel "inadequate". (V) They feel it is just very difficult to put hands up and admit that they parent differently.
Answer
  • I
  • II
  • III
  • IV
  • V

Question 80

Question
(I) If on a savannah in East Africa a male maassai giraffe with jagged spots approaches a female giraffe with rounded patches, would they mate? (II) In zoos they might, but in the wild they don’t, even if they share territory. (III) Recent genetic testing suggests why. (IV) Rather than one species, as was thought, there may be at least six. (V) Giraffes stick to their own kind, possibly by recognizing coat pattern, which also plays a role in camouflage.
Answer
  • I
  • II
  • III
  • IV
  • V
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