Physiology III: Excitatory and Inhibitory Neurotransmission in the CNS

Matthew Coulson
Quiz by Matthew Coulson, updated more than 1 year ago
Matthew Coulson
Created by Matthew Coulson over 1 year ago
14
1

Description

Excitatory and Inhibitory Neurotransmission in the CNS given on 4/9/2018

Resource summary

Question 1

Question
There is a higher concentration of [blank_start]Sodium[blank_end] on the outside of the cell and [blank_start]potassium[blank_end] inside the cell
Answer
  • sodium
  • potassium
  • potassium
  • sodium

Question 2

Question
The is a significantly [blank_start]higher[blank_end] concentration of Calcium extracellularly.
Answer
  • higher
  • lower

Question 3

Question
Na flows inwards, causing [blank_start]depolarisation[blank_end] which is [blank_start]excitatory[blank_end] Ca flows inwards, causing [blank_start]depolarisation[blank_end] which is [blank_start]excitatory[blank_end] Cl flows inwards, causing [blank_start]hyperpolarisation[blank_end] which is [blank_start]inhibitory[blank_end] K flows outwards, causing [blank_start]hyperpolarisation[blank_end] which is [blank_start]inhibitory[blank_end]
Answer
  • depolarisation
  • hyperpolarisation
  • depolarisation
  • hyperpolarisation
  • hyperpolarisation
  • depolarisation
  • hyperpolarisation
  • depolarisation
  • excitatory
  • inhibitory
  • excitatory
  • inhibitory
  • inhibitory
  • excitatory
  • inhibitory
  • excitatory

Question 4

Question
Based on the previous question, will a drug that acts as a Na channel antagonist be excitatory or inhibitory? [blank_start]Inhibitory[blank_end]
Answer
  • Inhibitory
  • Excitatory
  • Neither

Question 5

Question
Based on the previous question, will a drug that acts as a Potassium channel antagonist be excitatory or inhibitory? [blank_start]Excitatory[blank_end]
Answer
  • Excitatory
  • Inhibitory

Question 6

Question
Events at the Synapse are mostly mediated by means of ..
Answer
  • Calcium Channels
  • Sodium Channels
  • Potassium Channels
  • Chlorine Channels

Question 7

Question
There are two types of receptors upon which neurotransmitters can act. [blank_start]Ionotropic Receptor[blank_end]: Direct gating, whereby the receptor is an integral part of the channel it controls [blank_start]Metabotropic Receptor[blank_end]: Indirect gating, whereby the receptor and the channel it controls are distinct from one another.
Answer
  • Ionotropic Receptor
  • Metabotropic Receptor
  • Synapotropic Receptor

Question 8

Question
Label the receptor types shown in the diagram below.
Answer
  • Ionotropic Receptors
  • Synapotropic Receptors
  • Metabotropic Receptors

Question 9

Question
The major excitatory neurotransmitter is ...
Answer
  • GABA
  • Glutamate
  • Glycine
  • Dopamine

Question 10

Question
However, Glutamate can sometimes also elicit inhibitory effects via [blank_start]metabotropic[blank_end] glutamate receptors
Answer
  • metabotropic
  • ionotropic

Question 11

Question
Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors: NMDA receptors mediate [blank_start]slow[blank_end] excitatory synaptic transmission in the CNS Non-NMDA receptors mediate [blank_start]fast[blank_end] excitatory synaptic transmission in the CNS
Answer
  • fast
  • slow
  • slow
  • fast

Question 12

Question
The major inhibitory neurotransmitter is ...
Answer
  • Glutamine
  • GABA
  • Glycine
  • Dopamine

Question 13

Question
As GABA is an inhibitory Neurotransmitter, it tends to mediate which of the following ions. [blank_start]Potassium & Chlorine[blank_end]
Answer
  • Potassium & Chlorine
  • Potassium & Sodium
  • Sodium & Chlorine
  • Sodium & Calcium

Question 14

Question
Ionotropic GABA receptors tend to mediate [blank_start]Chlorine channels[blank_end] Metabotropic GABA receptors tend to mediate [blank_start]Potassium channels[blank_end]
Answer
  • Chlorine channels
  • Potassium channels
  • Potassium channels
  • Chlorine channels

Question 15

Question
[blank_start]Ionotropic[blank_end] Receptors are faster and act simply as 'on-off' switches for channels
Answer
  • Ionotropic
  • Metabotropic

Question 16

Question
[blank_start]Excitatory Post-Synaptic Potential (EPSP[blank_end]): Depolarising change in resting membrane potential caused by actions of neurotransmitters. [blank_start]Inhibitory Post-Synaptic Potential (IPSP[blank_end]): Hyperpolarising change change in resting potential caused by actions of neurotransmitters.
Answer
  • Excitatory Post-Synaptic Potential (EPSP
  • Inhibitory Post-Synaptic Potential (IPSP

Question 17

Question
A change in resting membrane potential caused by EPSP or IPSP that is not of sufficient magnitude to cross the threshold for an action potential is called ...
Answer
  • An Almost There Potential
  • A Graded Potential
  • A Median Potential
  • A Charted Potential

Question 18

Question
Which neurotransmitter are excitatory neurons most likely to release? [blank_start]Glutamate[blank_end]
Answer
  • Glutamate

Question 19

Question
Neurotransmitters are released in discrete packages called [blank_start]quanta[blank_end]
Answer
  • Quanta
  • Bundles
  • Quota

Question 20

Question
Label the diagram below relating to cells of the cerebellum.
Answer
  • Mossy Fibre
  • Granule Cell
  • Stellate Cell
  • Purkinje Cell
  • Basket Cell
  • Parallel Fibres
  • Climbing Fibre
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