L2 Basics of Cell Biology

Mer Scott
Quiz by Mer Scott, updated more than 1 year ago
Mer Scott
Created by Mer Scott almost 4 years ago
14
2

Description

Objectives: define the essential characteristics of living cells, consider the evolution of cells, summarise the biological classification of cells and organisms, outline the basic structures of cells, and describe important techniques to study cells.

Resource summary

Question 1

Question
Choose the statement which BEST describes a cell.
Answer
  • The simplest collection of matter which is alive.
  • One of the structures which make up a living organism.
  • A little living thing.

Question 2

Question
Select the statements about cells that are CORRECT.
Answer
  • All organisms are made of cells.
  • Cells can make up multicellular organisms.
  • All cells are identical.
  • Cells come in many different types.

Question 3

Question
The 3 Domains of living things are:
Answer
  • Eukarya, Bacteria, Archaea
  • Eukarya, Bacteria, Prokarya
  • Bacteria, Archaea, Prokarya
  • Eukarya, Bacteria, Protists

Question 4

Question
The Kingdoms of Domain Eukarya are:
Answer
  • Animalia, Plantae, Fungi, Protista
  • Animalia, Plants, Fungi, Protists
  • Animals, Plants, Fungi
  • Animalia, Plantae, Fungi

Question 5

Question
Bacteria and Archaea are [blank_start]prokaryotes[blank_end].
Answer
  • prokaryotic
  • eukaryotic
  • protists

Question 6

Question
Most plant and animal cells are between [blank_start]10-100μm[blank_end] in diameter. Bacteria is typically between [blank_start]1-5μm[blank_end] in diameter.
Answer
  • 10-100μm
  • 1-5μm

Question 7

Question
1mm = ?
Answer
  • 1000μm
  • 100μm
  • 10μm

Question 8

Question
Which statement about the endosymbiont theory is INCORRECT?
Answer
  • Mitochondria and plastids as we know them may have evolved from aerobic cells being engulfed by larger anaerobic cells, and this is known as the endosymbiont theory.
  • The endosymbiont theory is supported by the fact that mitochondria and plastids carry some of their own genes within themselves.
  • The endosymbiont theory suggests that organelles with double membranes evolved from bacteria to insert into eukaryotic cells.

Question 9

Question
Cells are limited to their sizes due to the ratio of surface area to volume of the cell. (s.a./V = smaller for smaller cells.) A small ratio means greater efficiency of exchange between environments.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 10

Question
[blank_start]Microscopes[blank_end] allow us to see cells. There are three important parameters in microscopy: - [blank_start]Magnification[blank_end], which is the [blank_start]ratio[blank_end] of the image compared to the actual size - [blank_start]Resolution[blank_end], which is the [blank_start]clarity[blank_end] of the image ("resolving of two points") - [blank_start]Contrast[blank_end], the difference between light and dark areas of image
Answer
  • Microscopes
  • Magnification
  • ratio
  • clarity
  • Resolution
  • Contrast

Question 11

Question
Light Microscopy (LM) and Electron Microscopy (EM) are the two types of microscopy used to look at cells.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 12

Question
Electron microscopy lets you look at live cells.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 13

Question
Light microscopy is the only imaging technique that lets you look at live cells.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 14

Question
Select the statements about electron microscopy that are CORRECT.
Answer
  • EM uses electrons to "slice" through a very thin cross section of a cell and look at it.
  • Resolution is INVERSELY proportional to wavelength. Therefore as an electron microscopes particles have very low wavelengths, the images produced have very high resolutions.
  • Resolution is PROPORTIONAL to wavelength. Since an electron microscope's particles have long wavelengths of light, they therefore produce high resolution pictures.

Question 15

Question
Electron microscopes come in [blank_start]two[blank_end] varieties. Firstly, [blank_start]scanning electron microscopes[blank_end]. Specimens coated in a thin film of gold are scanned and [blank_start]electrons[blank_end] that bounce back are used to create a 3D image of the specimen's surface. (These images are grey scale, only show us the [blank_start]surface[blank_end] of cells, and must be artificially/digitally coloured.) Secondly, [blank_start]transmission electron microscopy[blank_end]. This does not [blank_start]reflect[blank_end] electrons, but passes them [blank_start]through[blank_end] the specimen to produce an image of the cell's [blank_start]internal[blank_end] structure. Scattered electrons are collected by electromagnets to form an image. Again, the specimen must be stained with heavy metals.
Answer
  • two
  • scanning electron microscopes
  • transmission electron microscopy
  • electrons
  • surface
  • reflect
  • through
  • internal

Question 16

Question
Which organelles do animal cells have that plant cells DO NOT?
Answer
  • Lysosomes
  • Centrosomes
  • Endoplasmic Reticulum
  • Ribosomes

Question 17

Question
Which of the following is are structures found in plant cells but NOT in animal cells?
Answer
  • Vacuole
  • Cell Wall
  • Plasmodesmata
  • Golgi
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