Rhetorical Appeals By Jessica Pelka, Samantha Stanfill, Jordan Hall

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Mind Map by , created almost 6 years ago

Mind Map on Rhetorical Appeals By Jessica Pelka, Samantha Stanfill, Jordan Hall, created by jessicapelka on 11/11/2013.

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Created by jessicapelka almost 6 years ago
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Rhetorical Appeals By Jessica Pelka, Samantha Stanfill, Jordan Hall
1 Pathos
1.1 "Tis just. And it is very much lamented, Brutus, That you have no such mirrors as will turn Your hidden worthiness into your eye That You might see your shadow, I have heard Where many of the best respect in Rome, Except immortal Caesar, Speaking of Brutus And groaning underneath this age's yoke, Have wished that noble Brutus had his eye" (I.ii.56-64).
1.1.1 In this quote Cassius is tapping into Brutus's emotions and boosting his self-confidence by telling him that he needs to recognize how great he is. He is also telling him that the Roman people want him to be their ruler.
1.2 And be not jealous on me, gentle Brutus. Were I a common laughter, or did use To stale with ordinary oaths my love To every new protester, if you know That i do fawn on men and hug them hard And, after, or if you know That i profess myself in banqueting To all the rout, then hold me dangerous" (I.ii.73-80).
1.2.1 Cassius admits that he is going to use Brutus' honorability to his advantage.
1.3 "I cannot tell what you and other men Think of this life, but, for my single self, I had as lief not be as live to be In awe of such a thing as I myself. I was born free as Caesar. So were you. We both have fed as well, and we can both Endure the winter's cold as well as he. For once upon a raw and gusty day, The troubled Tiber chafing with her shores, Caesar said to me, "Darest thou, Cassius, now Leap in with me into this angry flood And swim to yonder point?" Upon the word, Accoutred as I was, I plunged in And bade him follow. So indeed he did. The torrent roared, and we did buffet it With lusty sinews, throwing it aside And stemming it with hearts of controversy. But ere we could arrive the point proposed, Caesar cried, "Help me, Cassius, or I sink!" I, as Aeneas, our great ancestor." (I.ii.95-114).
1.3.1 Cassius tells Brutus that he is just as strong and honorable as Caesar.
2 Logos
2.1 "I was born as free as Caesar; so were you; we both have fed as well, and we can both endure the winter's cold as well as he." (I.ii.102)
2.1.1 This shows that Cassius is trying to logically persuade Brutus that he is just as good as Caesar. They are not inferior to him, but equal.
2.2 "O name him not! Let us not break with him, for he will never follow anything that older men begin." (I.ii.162)
2.2.1 Brutus is trying to use logic to explain to Cassius why they should not include Cicero in their conspiracy against Caesar.
2.3 "Men at some time are masters of their fates." (I.ii.140)
2.3.1 Cassius is using logos to tell Brutus that he doesn't think that people's lives are not determined by fate, but men can use the logic in their own heads to determine the fate that lies ahead.
3 Ethos
3.1 "And since you know you cannot see yourself So well as by reflection, I, your glass, Will modestly discover to yourself That of yourself which you yet not know of. (I.ii.69-72)
3.1.1 Cassius is trying to appeal to the trust Brutus has in him, and show him that he is a good person.
3.2 "Fear him not, Caesar. He's not dangerous. He is a noble Roman and well given." (I.ii.167-169).
3.2.1 Antony is appealing to Caesar's feelings telling him not to worry about Cassius and is able to persuade him because Caesar trusts him.
3.3 "That you might see your shadow. I have heard Where many of the best respect in Rome, Except immortal Caesar, speaking of Brutus And groaning underneath his age's yoke Have you wished that noble Brutus had his eyes." (I.ii.60-64).
3.3.1 Cassius is telling Brutus that people in Rome truly do like him and since Brutus and Cassius are good friends, he is trying to get Brutus to believe him through his trust.

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