Pneumothorax

Amanda Coutch
Mind Map by , created about 3 years ago

Mind map of nursing care, assessment and breakdown of pneumothorax

96
0
0
Amanda Coutch
Created by Amanda Coutch about 3 years ago
Clinical History Taking: Single Best of Five (MCQ) Self Assessment
Chris Mulryan
Pediatrics Final: Chapters 10-20
mminter002
Nursing Care of the Older Person
Madison Blue Bec
Chemistry unit 2
36jessieh
PMP Formulas
Krunk!
Nervous System
4everlakena
Renal System A&P
Kirsty Jayne Buckley
Diabetes Mellitus
Kirsty Jayne Buckley
Veterinary Nursing Terminology
Kelly Winstanley
Nutrition
Ash Lig
Pneumothorax
1 Pneumothorax is caused by air in the pleural space. This can result in complete or partial collapse of a lung due to the build up of air in the pleural space.
1.1
1.1.1 collapsed lung
2 NURSING CARE & MANAGEMENT
2.1 PAIN MANAGEMENT
2.1.1 pharmacological
2.1.2 subjective description & pain scale
2.2 PHYSICAL ASSESSMENT
2.2.1 Signs & Symptoms
2.2.1.1 dyspnea
2.2.1.2 Sudden onset of chest pain - SHARP & PLEURITIC (Ryan, 2005).
2.2.1.3 limited movement of involved chest wall
2.2.1.3.1 asymmetrical chest movement
2.2.1.4 Diminished or absent breath sounds
2.2.1.5 cyanosis
2.2.1.6 open chest wound
2.2.1.6.1 audible air escaping from chest wound
2.2.1.7 rapid, thready pulse
2.2.1.8 decreased blood pressure
2.2.1.8.1 asymmetrical blood pressure values in arms
2.2.1.8.2 narrowed pulse pressure
2.2.1.9 bruising
2.2.1.10 decreased O2 saturation
2.2.1.11 tracheal deviation
2.2.1.12 abrasions
2.2.1.13 Mental status changes - due to decreased cardiac output
2.3 DIAGNOSTIC TESTS
2.3.1 Chest Radiograph
2.3.2 CHEST XRAY
2.3.3 Electrocardiogram
2.4 Patient in upright position
2.5 Chest drain tube - inserted into the pleural space & attached to an underwater seal drainage bottle (Briggs, 2010).
2.5.1 aseptic technique
2.5.2 analgesia prior to insertion
3 TYPES
3.1 Primary spontaneous pneumonthorax is when the patient has no obvious underlying lung disease (Briggs, 2010).
3.1.1 HIGH RISK: young, men with low body weight and smoking
3.1.2 Secondary spontaneous pneumothorax occurs when the invidual has underlying lung disease (Briggs, 2010).
3.1.2.1 LUNG DISEASE
3.1.2.1.1 COPD
3.1.2.1.2 weakens the alveolar-pleural barrier (Ryan, 2005).
3.1.3 Closed Pneumothorax - not caused by trauma or external wound. Caused by ruptures of air-filled alveoli (blebs) on the edge of the lungs
3.1.4 Catamenial Pneumothorax - RARE CONDITION - onset during a woman's menstrual period (The Lung Association, 2012).
3.1.4.1 Women in their 30 & 40s
3.2 Open Pneumothorax - caused by air entry to the pleural space through an external wound, permeating the chest wall
3.2.1 Vented dressing - dressing secured on 3 sides of the opening. Fourth side left open to allow air to pass through
3.2.1.1 decreases chance of tension pneumothorax
3.2.2
3.3 Tension Pneumothorax - increased tension in the pleural space due to rapid build up of air, which increases intrapleural pressure
3.3.1 life-threatening complication - occuring in 1-3% of spontaneous pneumothorax (Ryan, 2005).
3.3.2 causes lung collapse on affected side
3.3.2.1 increased pressure causes mediastinum and compression of the contralateral lung, heart and great vessels (Ryan, 2005).
3.4 Traumatic Pneumothorax - caused by blunt or penetrating trauma (Ryan, 2005).
3.4.1 Gun wound
3.4.2 rib fracture
3.4.3 Car accident
3.4.4 Fall
3.4.5
4 AVOID SCUBA DIVING to prevent recurrence (The Lung Association, 2012).