Webern - Quartet Op. 22: Mvt 1

wi11mcd
Mind Map by , created over 5 years ago

A Levels Music (Instrumental) Mind Map on Webern - Quartet Op. 22: Mvt 1, created by wi11mcd on 04/08/2014.

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wi11mcd
Created by wi11mcd over 5 years ago
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Webern - Quartet Op. 22: Mvt 1
1 Instruments and forces
1.1 • Webern uses unusual group of instruments to aid in creation of klangfarbenmelodie
1.2 • Various technical markings for violin part, e.g. use of Dämpfer – bar 1, and often rapid changes beteen pizz and arco – bar 23
1.3 • Dynamics change often, but are mostly very quiet e.g. pp at bar 2
1.4 • Wide leaps in the clarinet – e.g. bar 16
1.5 • Violin has a 3.5 octave range – lowest note at bar 16 – highest at bar 22
1.6 • Piano plays in 2 part texture throughout the piece
1.7 • Changes of clef e.g. bars 28-29
2 Structure
2.1 • Piece is in sonata form with no second subject
2.2 • There is a 5 bar introduction and a coda to end, beginning at bar 39
2.3 • Traditional tonal aspect to the structure has been replaced by serial technique
2.4 • Piece made up of tone rows with octave displacement
2.5 • Prime row doesn’t start until bar 6
2.6 • Beginning of each section is highlighted by rit… a tempo markings e.g. bar 6
3 Melody
3.1 • Melody created from tone row, with use of octave displacement e.g. bars 22-23 in violin part
3.2 • Disjunct melody melody with wide leaps with are often angular
3.3 • Use of klangfarbenmelodie to add colour to melody
3.4 • Palindrome (same but backwards) of beginning a bars 24-26 and 39-42
3.5 • Large range, especially in violin part – 3.5 octave range lowest note at bar 16 – highest at bar 22
3.6 • Wide leaps in clarinet part e.g. bar 16
4 Rhythm
4.1 • 4 rhythmic patterns for entire piece all of which are found within the first 3 bars
4.1.1 Idea taken from Bach
4.2 • Rapid changes of metre bars 16-24
4.3 • Metre is masked by syncopation – e.g. bar 22
4.4 • Coda – momentum slowed by pauses
4.5 • Beginning of each section is highlighted by rit… a tempo markings e.g. bar 6
4.6 • Augmentation of original rhythmic patterns e.g. bar 35
5 Harmony
5.1 • Range of different types of tone rows: prime, transposed, inversions and retrogrades
5.2 • Entirely chromatic harmony throughout the piece
5.3 • Verticalisation – bar 14
5.4 • Enharmonic equivalents of notes e.g. bar 23
5.5 • Octave displacement e.g. bars 22-23
5.6 • Palindrome (same but backwards) of beginning a bars 24-26 and 39-42
6 Tonality
6.1 • Atonal
6.2 • Serialist
6.3 • Chromatic
6.4 • Based on tone rows - prime, transposed, inversions and retrogrades
7 Texture
7.1 • Monophonic introduction
7.2 • Use of contrapuntal textures at bar 6
7.3 • 3 part counterpoint during exposition
7.4 • Use of Cantus Firmus at bars 6 – 14
7.5 • Mirror cannon (intervals reversed) at bar 28
7.6 • Stretto (entries become closer together) in development – e.g. 22-23
7.7 • Texture thickened by overlapping rows

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