Jae Chastain
Note by , created about 6 years ago

Journalism A Note on Unit 2, created by Jae Chastain on 08/25/2013.

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Jae Chastain
Created by Jae Chastain about 6 years ago
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Page 1

Jack London on the San Francisco earthquake/firehttp://london.sonoma.edu/Writings/Journalism/sfearthquake.html

Brainstorming articles21 ways:http://www.poynter.org/uncategorized/1774/twenty-one-ways-to-find-story-ideas/Idea Generators:http://www.poynter.org/how-tos/newsgathering-storytelling/chip-on-your-shoulder/5842/idea-generators-creativity-tools-for-journalists/

Good ideas from article Idea Generators:Daybook: commonplace book, my little sketchbook

Vocab:Angle - Focus of a story given by the author

REMEMBER:5 sources for every article, at least 3 primary.

Primary Sources:interviews, personal observations, surveys, or certified documents.

Secondary Sources:research already recorded by someone else in print, on the internet, or in any other media.

Favorite tips from 21 ways:1. Always be on the hunt2. Pay attention to ads3. Study maps of your area4. Mark anniversaries of big events a year ahead of time5. Hand out business cards like candy6. Contact previous sources7. Finish interviews with the question "Anything else going on?"

Take notes, accuracy matters.

you may conduct survey for primary sourcesguidelines:you can email friends and family and kids you know are classmates only.You can make your own survey and tabulate the results or use a service like surveymonkey.

-identify the objective purpose of the survey-write an introductory paragraph explaining what the survey's for-use closed questions so they can be quantified-analyze response data properly

write open-ended questions for interviews

By definition, the lead is one or more sentences that reveals as much as possible about who, what, when, where, and how. The straight summary lead must answer all of these questions in 35 words or fewer.

The creative leads include quotation, direct-address, face or scene, contrast and narrative. These types of leads are suited for the less formal style of the straight news story. Creative leads catch the attention of the audience by introducing them to an interesting element of the story and then providing them the rest of the important information: who, what, when, where, and how.

The summary lead must have 35 or fewer words that answer who, what, when, where, and how questions.

The creative leads include quotation, direct-address, face or scene, contrast and narrative. These types of leads are suited for the less formal style of the straight news story. Creative leads catch the attention of the audience by introducing them to an interesting element of the story and then providing them the rest of the important information: who, what, when, where, and how.

The narrative lead uses an anecdote to engage the audience in the story.

The narrative lead uses an anecdote to engage the audience in the story.

The contrast lead consists of two or three short lead paragraphs that show the contrasts between moods, settings, people, things, or events.

The contrast lead consists of two or three short lead paragraphs that show the contrasts between moods, settings, people, things, or events.

The objective consists of short, snappy phrases that catch the attention of the audience and "set the scene" before providing Information about who, what, when, where, and how.

The objective consists of short, snappy phrases that catch the attention of the audience and "set the scene" before providing Information about who, what, when, where, and how.

The direct-address lead addresses the audience as "you." This lead should be used with care and is appropriate only in specific types of stories.

The face or scene lead provides descriptive images of a person or setting that is significant to the story.

The face or scene lead provides descriptive images of a person or setting that is significant to the story.

Lesson 1

Lesson 2

Lesson 3