Character Analysis

moodle
Note by , created about 6 years ago

English Note on Character Analysis, created by moodle on 10/01/2013.

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moodle
Created by moodle about 6 years ago
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Page 1

George: A strong; prominent character within the novel. Seemingly intellectual when compared to other characters in the same circumstances. Reliant of companionship- hence, he continues to journey with Lennie; despite causing so many difficulties for him as an individual. Fears solitude. Similarly to many characters in the novel, George has an 'American Dream' of his own. Diligent and determined: George has no desire to get involved in other's business; his main focus is achieving his life ambitions. Feels a duty of care towards Lennie. Self-assured- he is aware of his purpose.  Protective of Lennie. 

Lennie: Holds a childlike naivety which inevitably ushers him into into morose occurrences. Mentally challenged- his mind is equal to that of a child. Large in stature and hence, an excellent attribution to the ranch. Reliant of George, Requires a feeling of security and belonging. Idolizes George- hence, copying his demeanour and monologue; furthermore, sharing the ambitions of George. Innocent, yet unaware of his own strength. A weak character: due to his lack of intelligence and seemingly childlike nature. Holds an obsession with 'soft' objects or animals. 

Candy: Weak character: due to his age and disability.  A liability on the ranch. Forlorn; hence relying on the companionship of his dog. 

Curley: Aggressive; pugnacious. A prominent character due to his position on the ranch. Possesses a streak of 'Small Man Syndrome'. Attempts to establish his masculinity and authority through violence. Derogatory towards females; specifically his wife Curley. Objectifies women. Insecure- hence, he so desperately attempts to assert his dominance in order to build his cripplingly low self-esteem. Treats others with contempt.  Spiteful.

Curley's Wife: Attention seeking. Lonely- hence, so provocative Seeks companionship. Dissatisfied with her relationship with Curley. Objectified. Nameless; not entitled to her own identity. Secretly holds her own ambitions. Sexualized.  A weak character, merely due to her gender. Feels solitude- the only female on the ranch; yet isolated by other males whom cast aspersions on her character due to her 'slutty' appearance.

Slim: A prominent character: due to his position on the ranch. Respected by his counterparts. Holds an air of confidence.  Intelligent. Many find his presence re-assuring. Clearly self-assured and therefore, a stable character within the novel. Evidently an amicable figure; hence, spoke highly of by many. Diligent.

Crooks: Segregated due to both his race and disability. A feeble character.  Highly intelligent. Maintains a more permanent role on the ranch. Similarly to Curley's wife; lacks identity. Treated with contempt by others; viewed as inferior. Unable to socialise or converse with his associates.  A proud character; hence, ashamed of admitting his desire for companionship. Fears vulnerability.  Despondent- coursed into a stream of depression and hopelessness on witnessing the failed ambitions of others. Despite knowing how credulous it is to have such fantasies, he still longs for the quintessential 'American Dream'. An outcast; ostracised by society. 

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