jodiebawden1
Note by , created over 5 years ago

Note on ENGLISH, created by jodiebawden1 on 03/26/2014.

642
0
0
Tags No tags specified
jodiebawden1
Created by jodiebawden1 over 5 years ago
New English Literature GCSE
Sarah Egan
Using GoConqr to study English literature
Sarah Egan
Chapter 5: Short-term and Working Memory
krupa8711
Language Analysis
Connie Theobald
Relationships in Streetcar
Alanna Pearson
Animal Farm Chapter Overview
10jgorman
A View from the Bridge Quotes
Emma Payne
Gatsby notes on symbolism and themes
Maria-Rodriguez
Frankenstein Critic Quotes
Chloe Day

Page 1

Completely new words:COINAGE

Words from other languages:BORROWINGAmericanisms, Prince (French), Lager (German), Alcohol(Arabic).

Words formed from existing words: AFFIXINGThis involves adding prefixes or suffixes to existing words to form new words.COMPOUNDINGWhen words are combined to form new words: blackbird or laptopBLENDINGOnly parts of words are joined together: smog or motel

Words formed by shortening:ABBREVIATIONBACK FORMATIONACRONYMS INITIALISMSWORDS FROM NAMES

Losing words from the lexiconARCHAISMSenouw - enough, forsooth - in truth, bark - ship.

SEMANTIC CHANGE

BROADENINGA word retains its old meanings, but takes on new meanings as well.

NARROWINGA word becomes more specific in its meaning.

AMELIORATIONWhen the meaning of a word becomes more pleasant or positive.

PEJORATIONWhen the meaning of a word becomes less favorable.

WEAKENINGA word loses force over time

IDIOMSFormed from previously existing words

EUPHEMISMSA mild / inoffensive way way of describing something.  

INFLECTIONSVERB inflections usually indicate tense, person or number.NOUN inflections usually show number or gender.ADJECTIVE inflections are used for comparatives and superlatives, as in fast, faster, fastest. 

WORD ORDER In comparison to modern English, the expression of meaning was less dependent on word order. As a result, word order showed more variation. 

NEGATIVE CONSTRUCTIONSToday, multiple negatives are considered incorrect grammar. In the late 19th Century 'not' was added at the end of positive sentences to create irony. 

VERB TENSES PAST PRESENT FUTURE SIMPLE  CONTINUOUS PERFECT PERFECT CONTINUOUS

AUXILIARY VERBSAuxiliary verbs are helping verbs: To be, To have, To doThey go in front of main verbs to: Help create tenses Form questions Form negatives Add emphasis 

Lexical Change

Semantic change

Grammatical Change

Verbs