Iron in Health and Disease

Matthew Coulson
Quiz by Matthew Coulson, updated more than 1 year ago
Matthew Coulson
Created by Matthew Coulson over 2 years ago
12
1

Description

Honours Degree Medicine (Haematology - Week 1) Quiz on Iron in Health and Disease, created by Matthew Coulson on 03/02/2019.

Resource summary

Question 1

Question
Forms of iron: Ferric = [blank_start]Fe3+[blank_end] Ferrous = [blank_start]Fe2+[blank_end]
Answer
  • Fe2+
  • Fe3+

Question 2

Question
There is no mechanism for iron excretion.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 3

Question
Approximately [blank_start]1[blank_end]mg of iron is absorbed by the body per day.
Answer
  • 1

Question 4

Question
Iron absorption occurs mainly in which part of the small bowel? The [blank_start]duodenum[blank_end]
Answer
  • duodenum

Question 5

Question
Iron absorption is decreased by alcohol consumption.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 6

Question
Duodenal cytochrome B, found in the luminal surface, is responsible for [blank_start]reducing[blank_end] [blank_start]ferric[blank_end] iron to [blank_start]ferrous[blank_end] iron
Answer
  • ferrous
  • ferric
  • ferric
  • ferrous
  • reducing
  • oxidising

Question 7

Question
[blank_start]Hepcidin[blank_end] is the main regulator of iron absorption. In cases of haemochromatosis, this structure binds to ferroportin and causes its degradation, thus disabling the transfer of iron to transferrin
Answer
  • Hepcidin

Question 8

Question
Assessment of body iron levels: [blank_start]Functional Iron[blank_end] = Measure Haemoglobin concentration [blank_start]Transport Iron[blank_end] = Measure % saturation of transferrin with iron [blank_start]Storage Iron[blank_end] = Measure serum ferritin
Answer
  • Storage Iron
  • Transport Iron
  • Functional Iron
  • Regulated Iron

Question 9

Question
Transferrin has [blank_start]2[blank_end] binding sites for iron
Answer
  • 2
  • 4
  • 6
  • 8

Question 10

Question
[blank_start]Holotransferrin[blank_end] = Transferrin bound to iron [blank_start]Apotransferrin[blank_end] = Transferrin not bound to iron
Answer
  • Holotransferrin
  • Apotransferrin

Question 11

Question
Ferritin can store up to 4000 [blank_start]ferric[blank_end] ions
Answer
  • ferric
  • ferrous

Question 12

Question
Which 4 of the follows factors can increase serum ferritin?
Answer
  • Inflammation
  • Sepsis
  • Malignancy
  • Liver injury
  • Kidney Injury
  • Hypoxia
  • Anaemia

Question 13

Question
Name this clinical sign which can occur due to iron deficiency. [blank_start]Koilonychia[blank_end]
Answer
  • Koilonychia

Question 14

Question
Iron deficiency can also cause inflammation and scarring of the corner of the mouth. This sign is called [blank_start]angular stomatitis[blank_end]
Answer
  • angular stomatitis

Question 15

Question
Iron deficiency causes a [blank_start]microcytic[blank_end] anaemia
Answer
  • microcytic
  • macrocytic

Question 16

Question
There are greater requirements for iron in [blank_start]women and children[blank_end] thus they are more likely to develop iron deficiency.
Answer
  • women and children
  • women
  • men
  • men and children

Question 17

Question
As well as poor dietary intake, which of the following can also cause iron deficiency anaemia?
Answer
  • Menorrhagia
  • Gastric Ulcers
  • NSAIDs
  • Haematuria
  • Coeliac Disease
  • Ulcerative Colitis

Question 18

Question
The two types of haemochromatosis are primary and secondary: [blank_start]Secondary[blank_end] haemochromatosis usually is the result of transfusions or iron loading anaemias. [blank_start]Primary[blank_end] haemochromatosis is caused by a defect in the genes that control how much iron you absorb from food.
Answer
  • Secondary
  • Primary

Question 19

Question
Hereditary Haemochromatosis is a primary haemochromatosis that typically arises due to a mutation of the HFE gene causing a decreased synthesis of which regulative protein? [blank_start]Hepcidin[blank_end]
Answer
  • Hepcidin

Question 20

Question
Haemochromatosis can cause erectile dysfunction in males
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 21

Question
Which three of the following can be caused by haemochromatosis?
Answer
  • Weakness/fatigue
  • Joint pains
  • Cirrhosis
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Cluster headaches
  • Trigeminal neuralgia

Question 22

Question
Hereditary Haemochromatosis most commonly occurs due to mutations in the [blank_start]HFE[blank_end] gene
Answer
  • HFE

Question 23

Question
The initial treatment of choice for hereditary haemochromatosis in non-anaemic individuals is weekly [blank_start]venesection[blank_end]
Answer
  • venesection

Question 24

Question
The most common cause of death for those suffering from Hereditary Haemochromatosis is ...
Answer
  • Diabetes
  • Hepatoma
  • Cardiac Failure

Question 25

Question
Secondary Iron Overload should be treated with weekly venesection.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 26

Question
Primary Iron Overload. E.g. [blank_start]Hereditary Haemochromatosis[blank_end]. Should be treated with [blank_start]weekly venesection[blank_end] Secondary Iron Overload. E.g. [blank_start]Thalassaemia/Transfusion[blank_end]. Should be treated with [blank_start]iron chelating agents[blank_end]
Answer
  • weekly venesection
  • iron chelating agents
  • Thalassaemia/Transfusion
  • Hereditary Haemochromatosis
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