Leadership Quiz

Sarah Mimnaugh
Quiz by , created 2 months ago

1. SHRM - Leadership (Leadership & Navigation) Quiz on Leadership Quiz, created by Sarah Mimnaugh on 07/16/2019.

0
0
0
Tags
Sarah Mimnaugh
Created by Sarah Mimnaugh 2 months ago
All AS Maths Equations/Calculations and Questions
natashaaaa
Characters in "An Inspector Calls"
Esme Gillen
OCR Physics P4 Revision
Dan Allibone
GCSE Maths: Understanding Pythagoras' Theorem
Micheal Heffernan
Principios de Vuelo
Adriana Forero
Strategic Reward Management W9
Dilek Senturk
Spanish Vocabulary- Intermediate
PatrickNoonan
Blood Brothers (Characters)
nuhaheza
GCSE English Language Overview
philip.ellis
Macbeth Notes
Bella Ffion Martin

Question 1

Question
What leadership theory is characterized by the belief that managers must use different leadership styles depending on the circumstances?
Answer
  • Behavioral Theory
  • Trait Theory
  • Motivational Theory
  • Situational Leadership Theory

Question 2

Question
What is a trait of an effective leader?
Answer
  • Fulfilling promises and commitments
  • Providing detailed directions to subordinates
  • Terminating poor performers and promoting high performers
  • Allowing employees to manage themselves

Question 3

Question
A group has formed to organize the annual company picnic. Because one member has experience planning a church fall festival, he volunteers to take the helm. The other employees choose to follow him. Which kind of leadership does this exemplify?
Answer
  • Emergent
  • Situational
  • Behavioral
  • Contingency

Question 4

Question
The HR director of a 6,000-employee hospital is meeting with the hospital's CEO about potentially conducting an employee engagement survey. The hospital has never conducted an engagement survey. The hospital's turnover is low, and it pays competitive wages and benefits. It is nonunion except for about 200 employees in its food service department. There is a sense that a baseline assessment of employee work environment perceptions and the employees' commitment to serving patients is needed. While there is anecdotal evidence that employees are relatively satisfied with the work environment and committed to serving patients, employees have complained through the organizational hotline about lack of management support in some areas. Since other hospitals in the market have experienced union organizing activity, there is concern about possible unionization. While the CEO is interested in the survey, there is fear that it will raise employee expectations that the organization cannot meet, increasing employee dissatisfaction. The HR director is planning a follow-up meeting with the administrator and an external consultant. The goal is to share with the CEO best employer practices in conducting engagement surveys, the positive benefits of using surveys to improve morale, and appropriate engagement strategies and practices to support managers in improving performance and productivity. Given the CEO's reluctance, what is the best rationale the HR director can use to influence the CEO's decision to administer the employee engagement survey?
Answer
  • The survey will help in diagnosing organizational problems that are not apparent in everyday management
  • The survey will help in evaluating and improving the climate or culture in the organization
  • The survey will help in assessing and closing the gap between organizational strategy and employees commitment
  • The survey will help in gauging how vulnerable the organization is to unionization

Question 5

Question
The HR director of a 6,000-employee hospital is meeting with the hospital's CEO about potentially conducting an employee engagement survey. The hospital has never conducted an engagement survey. The hospital's turnover is low, and it pays competitive wages and benefits. It is nonunion except for about 200 employees in its food service department. There is a sense that a baseline assessment of employee work environment perceptions and the employees' commitment to serving patients is needed. While there is anecdotal evidence that employees are relatively satisfied with the work environment and committed to serving patients, employees have complained through the organizational hotline about lack of management support in some areas. Since other hospitals in the market have experienced union organizing activity, there is concern about possible unionization. While the CEO is interested in the survey, there is fear that it will raise employee expectations that the organization cannot meet, increasing employee dissatisfaction. The HR director is planning a follow-up meeting with the administrator and an external consultant. The goal is to share with the CEO best employer practices in conducting engagement surveys, the positive benefits of using surveys to improve morale, and appropriate engagement strategies and practices to support managers in improving performance and productivity. In developing the business case for the CEO in collaboration with the external consultant, which is the best action for the HR director to take?
Answer
  • Execute a formal contract specifying the consultant's relationship and expectations of engagement during the entire assignment.
  • Support the consultant in designing the engagement survey, providing appropriate guidance and feedback throughout the process
  • Lead the engagement survey design, seeking coaching, support, and feedback from the consultant in managing obstacles.
  • Develop and present the business case, with the consultant's collaborative input during the development and presentation processes

Question 6

Question
The HR director of a 6,000-employee hospital is meeting with the hospital's CEO about potentially conducting an employee engagement survey. The hospital has never conducted an engagement survey. The hospital's turnover is low, and it pays competitive wages and benefits. It is nonunion except for about 200 employees in its food service department. There is a sense that a baseline assessment of employee work environment perceptions and the employees' commitment to serving patients is needed. While there is anecdotal evidence that employees are relatively satisfied with the work environment and committed to serving patients, employees have complained through the organizational hotline about lack of management support in some areas. Since other hospitals in the market have experienced union organizing activity, there is concern about possible unionization. While the CEO is interested in the survey, there is fear that it will raise employee expectations that the organization cannot meet, increasing employee dissatisfaction. The HR director is planning a follow-up meeting with the administrator and an external consultant. The goal is to share with the CEO best employer practices in conducting engagement surveys, the positive benefits of using surveys to improve morale, and appropriate engagement strategies and practices to support managers in improving performance and productivity. What risks should the HR director share when recommending an employee engagement survey to the hospital's CEO?
Answer
  • Low senior leadership commitment poses significant risks when there is no credible action plan to address identified employee concerns.
  • The survey could raise unmanageable employee expectations that senior leadership neither can nor wants to fully meet in the future.
  • Inherent risks associated with an engagement survey, such as obtaining potential negative repeated feedback, cannot be fully mitigated.
  • Employees can challenge the validity of the survey through either individual or group legal actions.

Question 7

Question
The HR director of a 6,000-employee hospital is meeting with the hospital's CEO about potentially conducting an employee engagement survey. The hospital has never conducted an engagement survey. The hospital's turnover is low, and it pays competitive wages and benefits. It is nonunion except for about 200 employees in its food service department. There is a sense that a baseline assessment of employee work environment perceptions and the employees' commitment to serving patients is needed. While there is anecdotal evidence that employees are relatively satisfied with the work environment and committed to serving patients, employees have complained through the organizational hotline about lack of management support in some areas. Since other hospitals in the market have experienced union organizing activity, there is concern about possible unionization. While the CEO is interested in the survey, there is fear that it will raise employee expectations that the organization cannot meet, increasing employee dissatisfaction. The HR director is planning a follow-up meeting with the administrator and an external consultant. The goal is to share with the CEO best employer practices in conducting engagement surveys, the positive benefits of using surveys to improve morale, and appropriate engagement strategies and practices to support managers in improving performance and productivity. The CEO moves forward with the engagement survey. What is the first step the HR director should take with the food service workers' union?
Answer
  • Form a union and non-union employee participation committee to discuss conducting the engagement survey and seek their input in managing the project.
  • Initiate formal discussions with the labor union representatives about including food service workers in the survey and then seek labor council input.
  • Do not engage the union in the engagement survey discussion because to do so could be in violation of applicable labor laws.
  • Engage the union, with hospital's labor counsel, in an exploratory discussion to discuss the possible participation of bargaining unit employees in the survey.

Question 8

Question
The HR director of a 6,000-employee hospital is meeting with the hospital's CEO about potentially conducting an employee engagement survey. The hospital has never conducted an engagement survey. The hospital's turnover is low, and it pays competitive wages and benefits. It is nonunion except for about 200 employees in its food service department. There is a sense that a baseline assessment of employee work environment perceptions and the employees' commitment to serving patients is needed. While there is anecdotal evidence that employees are relatively satisfied with the work environment and committed to serving patients, employees have complained through the organizational hotline about lack of management support in some areas. Since other hospitals in the market have experienced union organizing activity, there is concern about possible unionization. While the CEO is interested in the survey, there is fear that it will raise employee expectations that the organization cannot meet, increasing employee dissatisfaction. The HR director is planning a follow-up meeting with the administrator and an external consultant. The goal is to share with the CEO best employer practices in conducting engagement surveys, the positive benefits of using surveys to improve morale, and appropriate engagement strategies and practices to support managers in improving performance and productivity. Which work environment factor should the HR director include in the survey to get a sense of employees' perceptions of management's support?
Answer
  • Whether managers set realistic performance expectations with employees on a consistent basis with communications
  • Degree to which managers demonstrate respect for employees as individuals and members of the team
  • How well managers put the right people in the right roles and provide developmental coaching
  • Whether managers accurately evaluate employees' potential and provide opportunities for development and growth

Question 9

Question
The HR director of a 6,000-employee hospital is meeting with the hospital's CEO about potentially conducting an employee engagement survey. The hospital has never conducted an engagement survey. The hospital's turnover is low, and it pays competitive wages and benefits. It is nonunion except for about 200 employees in its food service department. There is a sense that a baseline assessment of employee work environment perceptions and the employees' commitment to serving patients is needed. While there is anecdotal evidence that employees are relatively satisfied with the work environment and committed to serving patients, employees have complained through the organizational hotline about lack of management support in some areas. Since other hospitals in the market have experienced union organizing activity, there is concern about possible unionization. While the CEO is interested in the survey, there is fear that it will raise employee expectations that the organization cannot meet, increasing employee dissatisfaction. The HR director is planning a follow-up meeting with the administrator and an external consultant. The goal is to share with the CEO best employer practices in conducting engagement surveys, the positive benefits of using surveys to improve morale, and appropriate engagement strategies and practices to support managers in improving performance and productivity. What is the best course of action for the HR director in proactively addressing employee concerns with the engagement survey?
Answer
  • Meet with the union representative and legal counsel to share insights and get their perspectives.
  • Analyze new employee complaints to determine recurring trends and patterns indicating the need for the survey.
  • Advise the CEO about employee insights gained from complaints that support or negate the need for the survey
  • Explore employees' interest in participating in stay interviews to give insight to the organization.