Schools as a community space/Alternative living spaces

selinaward
Mind Map by , created over 6 years ago

K218 Working with children, young people and families Mind Map on Schools as a community space/Alternative living spaces, created by selinaward on 05/08/2013.

57
2
0
selinaward
Created by selinaward over 6 years ago
web of relationships
ibiorban
Skills and strategies for practice
ibiorban
Social Pedagogy
ibiorban
The Heart
annalieharrison
Key Definitions for organic chemistry
katburr23
Knowledge, skills and vales for good practice
selinaward
Law, social policy and practice
selinaward
A critical understanding of policy practice and service
ibiorban
Web of relationships/Social ecological perspective
selinaward
Social Pedagogy
selinaward
Schools as a community space/Alternative living spaces
1 Children raised in communities where there are limited opportunities to meet people from other communities may grow up with a worldview which excludes others.
1.1 Schools may have the capacity to confront prejudice, not only through the formal curriculum but, perhaps more importantly, through the ‘hidden curriculum’ such as the informal interactions outside the classroom, the behaviour and beliefs which are modelled by teachers and schools norms and values
1.1.1 Crafter argues that some teaching in schools may serve to undermine values, beliefs and ways of thinking learned in the home.
1.1.1.1 This may undermine children’s confidence and serve to distance them from their culture of origin, but the Movement for Integrated Education in Northern Ireland is based on the belief that, in the struggle to resolve conflict, school is the place to start.
2 In multi-cultural societies, schools offer a space where children and young people can mix and learn together. In some societies, schools have been used to segregate and have consolidated divisions in the wider society
2.1 There are arguments for and against integrated education, and adherence to one or the other view may be strong
3 It is important for practioners to understand where a child lives beucase they may have additional needs.
3.1 Care Plans are documents setting out the actions to be taken to meet the child’s or young person’s needs, and they record the person responsible for taking each identified action.
3.1.1 It will include information and recommendations about the child’s education, health and welfare. The local authority is responsible for ensuring that Care Plans are regularly reviewed and the identified actions carried out. They often include details of contact arrangements with friends and family. In this way, continuity of important attachments can be acknowledged and maintained.
4 The outcomes for many of the children who experience moves in and out of the care system can be poor. Entry into care is often traumatic, bringing with it a loss of contact with family and community.
4.1 60% of children ‘looked after’ in England were reported to have emotional and mental health problems, often leading to poor health, educational and social outcomes after leaving care.
4.1.1 Frequent placement changes can often affect a child’s sense of identity and self-esteem. Up to 80 per cent of ’looked after’ children and young people are living separately from key attachment figures, such as siblings.
4.1.1.1 For example, in the clip of young people that had left foster care, all described being split up from their siblings and other family members. They were often told by the social worker what was going to happen, rather than asking them what they wanted. False promises were also made like stating siblings would be kept together but in reality a "lack of resources" meant siblings were often split up so far apart that even visiting became an issue.
5 One well-established method of working with children and young people is life story work, or life course analysis. Life story work can help children and young people gather and talk about a personal or family history, and so help them develop a sense of identity.
5.1 It can be undertaken by practitioners working with cared-for children, but may also be a tool used successfully by adopters and others. It can be an organised activity with a trained person, or a more informal process reflected in the everyday conversations between carers and children and young people.
5.1.1 As with all tools, the method requires caution. It can help carers, their children and their foster children to share common ground in the spaces they inhabit, through co-constructing an understanding of the past
5.1.1.1 It is defined by Rose and Philpott (2005) as ‘a factual narrative about their [children’s] lives and the lives of those closest to them’
5.1.1.1.1 Rose and Philpott also suggest that:‘Life story work involves taking children along their journeys step by step, not passing over events, facts and beliefs or making the assumption that a child has understood or accepted, when that may not have been the case. At each step it is necessary to ensure that the child has first of all listened and then said that she has understood’
5.1.1.1.1.1 To avoid loss of identity "Big Connor" was given a life storey book by his social worker so he could understand his family background and maintain his family identity whilst in foster care.

Media attachments