Evaluation Research

Ryan Bentham
Quiz by Ryan Bentham, updated more than 1 year ago
Ryan Bentham
Created by Ryan Bentham over 3 years ago
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Description

Evaluation Research

Resource summary

Question 1

Question
[blank_start]Evaluation[blank_end] research attempts to answer questions about the [blank_start]value[blank_end] of social service programmes and to derive information which will improve programmes and policies.
Answer
  • Evaluation
  • value

Question 2

Question
Evaluation research is a skill that is in short supply.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 3

Question
Evaluation research is a major activity for many community and applied social psychologists.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 4

Question
Evaluation research is not inter-disciplinary.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 5

Question
A common view of evaluation is that it appears after which stage?
Answer
  • Problem
  • Input
  • Process
  • Output
  • Outcome

Question 6

Question
[blank_start]Problem[blank_end]: Young people getting into petty crime. [blank_start]Input[blank_end]: Boot camp. [blank_start]Process[blank_end]: Strict discipline, challenging activities. [blank_start]Output[blank_end]: Increased self-esteem. [blank_start]Outcome[blank_end]: Reduction in offending.
Answer
  • Problem
  • Input
  • Process
  • Output
  • Outcome

Question 7

Question
Considering the evaluation research for the boot camp programme, what would it mean if the research found no reduction in offending?
Answer
  • The programme is useless.
  • The programme does increase self-esteem, but self-esteem is not related to offending.
  • Parts of the programme are great, but it gives the participants opportunity to plot more crime.
  • You cannot tell much if all you do is assess outcomes.

Question 8

Question
Evaluation research should be done over the whole programme. What is the correct order of stages: 1. [blank_start]Problem[blank_end] 2. [blank_start]Input[blank_end] 3. [blank_start]Process[blank_end] 4. [blank_start]Output[blank_end] 5. [blank_start]Outcome[blank_end]
Answer
  • Problem
  • Input
  • Process
  • Output
  • Outcome

Question 9

Question
Types and stages of evaluation research: [blank_start]Formative (and needs assessment)[blank_end]: Before the programme begins e.g. Is a program needed? What sort of programme is needed? [blank_start]Process (monitoring)[blank_end]: Early in the life of the programme e.g. What are the strengths and weaknesses? How can it be improved? [blank_start]Outcome (impact)[blank_end]: "Mature" programme e.g. What is the effect of the programme? [blank_start]Cost effectiveness[blank_end]: "Mature" programme e.g. How efficient is the programme?
Answer
  • Formative (and needs assessment)
  • Process (monitoring)
  • Outcome (impact)
  • Cost effectiveness

Question 10

Question
What is the main purpose of evaluation?
Answer
  • To determine the worth of a programme.
  • To help programme managers improve.
  • To help maximise the allocation of scarce resources.
  • All of the above.

Question 11

Question
[blank_start]Program evaluation[blank_end] is the systematic collection of information about activities, characteristics, and outcomes of programs for use by specific people to reduce uncertainties, improve effectiveness, and make decisions with regard to what those programs are doing and affecting.
Answer
  • Program evaluation

Question 12

Question
Programme evaluation is...
Answer
  • Messy
  • Applied
  • Real world
  • Political
  • Sophisticated
  • Uncertain

Question 13

Question
Evaluations often use which types of data
Answer
  • Qualitative
  • Quantitative
  • Qualitative and Quantitative

Question 14

Question
The [blank_start]evaluator[blank_end] facilitates [blank_start]judgement[blank_end] and decision making by [blank_start]intended users[blank_end] rather than acting as a distant, [blank_start]independent judge[blank_end]. Since no [blank_start]evaluation[blank_end] can be [blank_start]value-free[blank_end], utilisation-focussed evaluation answers the questions of whose [blank_start]values[blank_end] will frame the evaluation by working with intended users who have responsibility to [blank_start]apply[blank_end] evaluation findings and [blank_start]implement[blank_end] recommendations.
Answer
  • evaluator
  • judgement
  • intended users
  • independent judge
  • evaluation
  • value-free
  • values
  • implement
  • apply
  • researcher
  • ignore
  • discard

Question 15

Question
The implicit model for evaluation research relates to policy adoption and has the following stages. 1. [blank_start]Problem[blank_end] 2. [blank_start]Pilot project(s)[blank_end] 3. [blank_start]Evaluation[blank_end] 4. [blank_start]Policy decision - adopt or not[blank_end]
Answer
  • Problem
  • Pilot project(s)
  • Evaluation
  • Policy decision - adopt or not

Question 16

Question
The three stages of setting up an evaluation include 1. [blank_start]Request for proposals[blank_end] 2. [blank_start]Write proposal(s)[blank_end] 3. [blank_start]Selecting and signing of contract[blank_end]
Answer
  • Selecting and signing of contract
  • Write proposal(s)
  • Request for proposals

Question 17

Question
A contact for evaluation research is often secured through a tender process.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 18

Question
Some of the key findings from the evaluation of the mentoring programmes for youth at risk or offending include
Answer
  • Most sites took longer to get established than planned, meaning there was often less to evaluate than expected.
  • The implementation varied significantly across providers.
  • Relationships were found to be beneficial

Question 19

Question
An evaluation is ideally conducted over a short period of time.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 20

Question
Controls are usually impossible when conducting evaluations.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 21

Question
Evaluation is not a political process at all.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 22

Question
[blank_start]Applied[blank_end] research which can make a [blank_start]difference[blank_end]. Evaluations can [blank_start]advocate[blank_end] for [blank_start]poorly served groups[blank_end]. Can enhance programmes and policies - a [blank_start]reformist approach to social change[blank_end]. Good evaluations usually used [blank_start]mixed[blank_end] methods and requires [blank_start]collaborative[blank_end] working with all [blank_start]stakeholders[blank_end].
Answer
  • Applied
  • difference
  • advocate
  • poorly served groups
  • reformist approach to social change
  • mixed
  • collaborative
  • stakeholders

Question 23

Question
An evaluator can be an impartial referee or judge, a cheerleader, or an involved (and partial) coach.
Answer
  • True
  • False
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