AQA GCSE Biology B1- Quiz

Ethan Beadling
Quiz by , created over 4 years ago

These questions and answers have been created with the specification as an aid, so bear that in mind when reading up on the explanations afterwards. When finished, it will take all of Biology Unit 1 into account.

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Ethan Beadling
Created by Ethan Beadling over 4 years ago
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Question 1

Question
Which of these food groups are used primarily to release energy, and aid in the building of cells?
Answer
  • Lipids (more commonly referred to as fats)
  • Carbohydrates
  • Vitamins
  • Mineral ions
  • Proteins
  • Fibre

Question 2

Question
Malnourishment is most accurately described as a condition caused by not eating enough food, leading to the sufferer becoming dangerously underweight.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 3

Question
Which of these answers best describes the process in which a person loses mass?
Answer
  • A person loses mass when the energy content of the food taken in is less than the amount of energy expended by the body.
  • A person loses mass when the energy content of the food taken in is more than the amount of energy expended by the body.
  • A person loses mass when the energy content of the food taken in is reduced, even when this reduction is proportional to a decline in physical activity.
  • A person loses mass by having the amount of energy expended by the body incredibly high, even when this increase in expenditure is compensated for with a proportionally high energy content of food being taken in.

Question 4

Question
Metabolic rate is the rate at which all the chemical reactions in the cells of the body are carried out.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 5

Question
Which of the following are the main factors affecting metabolic rate, according to the specification?
Answer
  • The amount of activity a person does.
  • Hereditary factors.
  • The proportion of muscle to fat in a person's body.

Question 6

Question
A person's cholesterol level is solely based on their diet.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 7

Question
High levels of cholesterol in the blood increases the risk of developing plaques in the walls of the arteries, which can lead to clotting, thus preventing oxygenated blood from getting to the heart and causing a heart attack. How does saturated fat (the fat found in animal products) affect the cholesterol level?
Answer
  • Saturated fats raise a person's blood cholesterol levels.
  • Saturated fats lower a person's blood cholesterol levels.

Question 8

Question
What does the LDL of LDL cholesterol stand for?
Answer
  • Low-density lipoprotein.
  • Low-density lipid.
  • Light-density lipid.

Question 9

Question
Finish this statement: microbes that cause infectious disease are called...
Answer
  • pathogens.
  • phagocytes.
  • passogens.

Question 10

Question
An epidemic occurs when a disease affects a whole country or goes worldwide.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 11

Question
How do pathogens directly make people feel ill?
Answer
  • Pathogens release toxins in the body.
  • Viruses reproduce in our body cells, destroying the cells in the process.
  • Viruses take the place of oxygen with our haemoglobin, preventing the production of oxyhaemoglobin, leading people to asphyxiation.
  • Bacteria consume capillaries, as the capillaries are one cell thick and so easy to digest.

Question 12

Question
Lymphocytes are white blood cells that ingest pathogens.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 13

Question
Lymphocytes are the white blood cells which release antibodies, which then neutralise the specific antigen present in the body.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 14

Question
Which of these methods describes the most effective and modern process in which a person is made immune to a bacteria, and can often reduce the spread of the pathogen amongst a large population?
Answer
  • Vaccination.
  • Cauterisation.
  • Inoculation.
  • Amputation.

Question 15

Question
What was the name of the doctor that recognised the importance of hand-washing in the prevention of spreading some infectious diseases?
Answer
  • Joseph Lister.
  • Ignaz Semmelweis.
  • The name of the doctor is unknown.
  • Louis Pasteur.

Question 16

Question
Painkillers reduce the symptoms of infectious disease by killing a limited number of pathogens.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 17

Question
Certain antibiotics can kill all forms of pathogens depending on the dosage.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 18

Question
Whilst the use of antibiotics has greatly reduced deaths from infectious bacterial diseases, overuse and inappropriate use of antibiotics has increased the rate of development of antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria. Which of the following is one such bacterium?
Answer
  • MRSA
  • Salmonella enteritidis
  • E. coli
  • Smallpox

Question 19

Question
Mutations of pathogens produce new strains. Antibiotics and vaccinations may no longer be effective against a new resistant strain of the pathogen. The new strain will then spread rapidly because people are not immune to it and there is no effective treatment. As such, which of the following are steps relevant to the process of resistance?
Answer
  • Antibiotics kill individual pathogens of the non-resistant strain.
  • Individual resistant pathogens survive and reproduce, so the population of the resistant strain increases.
  • Now, antibiotics are not used to treat non-serious infections, such as mild throat infections, so that the rate of development of resistant strains is slowed down.
  • The rare case in which viruses gradually become resistant to antibiotics allows them to reproduce quickly, and as such further antibiotics are ineffectual against them.
  • Due to the nature of some bacterial infections, a doctor can afford to be incautious when prescribing antibiotics.
  • The development of antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria necessitates the development of new antibiotics.

Question 20

Question
People can be immunised against a disease by introducing small quantities of dead or inactive forms of the pathogen into the body (vaccination). How does this work?
Answer
  • Vaccines stimulate the white blood cells to produce antibodies that destroy the pathogens. This makes the person immune to future infections by the microorganism. The body can respond by rapidly making the correct antibody, in the same way as if the person had previously had the disease.
  • Vaccines stimulate the red blood cells to produce antibodies that destroy the pathogens. This makes the person immune to future infections by the microorganism. The body can respond by rapidly making the correct antibody, in the same way as if the person had previously had the disease.
  • Vaccines stimulate the white blood cells to produce antibodies that destroy the pathogens. This makes the person immune to future infections by the microorganism. The body can respond by rapidly making the correct phagocytes, in the same way as if the person had previously had the disease.
  • Vaccines stimulate the phagocytes to produce antibodies that destroy the pathogens. This makes the person immune to future infections by the microorganism. The body can respond by rapidly making the correct antibody, in the same way as if the person had previously had the disease.

Question 21

Question
Uncontaminated cultures of microorganisms are required for investigating the action of disinfectants and antibiotics. For this process to take place, which of the following steps must be taken out?
Answer
  • Petri dishes and culture media must be sterilised before use to kill unwanted microorganisms.
  • Inoculating loops used to transfer microorganisms to the media must be sterilised by passing them through a flame.
  • The lid of the Petri dish should be secured with adhesive tape to prevent microorganisms from the air contaminating the culture.
  • The Petri dish must be contained within a vacuum in order to ensure to bacteria can contaminate the culture.
  • The nutrient jelly (agar) mustn't be touched or breathed on in order to prevent contaminating the culture.

Question 22

Question
At what temperature should cultures be incubated at in schools and college laboratories in order to reduce the risk of growth of pathogens that are potentially harmful to humans?
Answer
  • 37°C
  • 27°C
  • 25°C
  • 20°C
  • 30°C

Question 23

Question
What is the purpose of the nervous system?
Answer
  • The nervous system enables humans to react to their surroundings and coordinate their behaviour.
  • The nervous system provides a pathway for hormones to travel through the body.

Question 24

Question
Cells called receptors detect stimuli (changes in the environment). Which of the following are the correct combinations of receptors and their respective primary stimuli?
Answer
  • Receptors in the eyes that are sensitive to light.
  • Receptors in the ears that are sensitive to sound.
  • Receptors in the ears that are sensitive to changes in position and enable us to keep our balance.
  • Receptors on the tongue and in the nose that are sensitive to chemicals and enable us to taste and to smell
  • Receptors in the skin that are sensitive to touch, pressure, pain and to temperature changes.
  • Receptors in the skin that are sensitive to light.
  • Receptors in the eyes that are sensitive to touch, pressure, pain and to temperature changes.
  • Receptors in the ears which are sensitive to chemicals.

Question 25

Question
Light receptor cells, like most animal cells, have a nucleus, cytoplasm and cell membrane.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 26

Question
Information from receptors passes along cells (neurones) in nerves to the brain. The brain coordinates the response. Reflex actions are automatic and rapid, and often involve three types of neurones. What are these three types of neurones?
Answer
  • Relay.
  • Motor.
  • Sensory.
  • Mechanical.
  • CNS.
  • Spinal.
  • Synapse.

Question 27

Question
Candidates should understand the role of receptors, sensory neurones, motor neurones, relay neurones, synapses and effectors in simple reflex actions. In a simple reflex action, which of the following statements are involved?
Answer
  • Impulses from a receptor pass along a sensory neurone to the central nervous system.
  • At a junction (synapse) between a sensory neurone and a relay neurone in the central nervous system, a chemical is released that causes an impulse to be sent along a relay neurone.
  • A chemical is then released at the synapse between a relay neurone and motor neurone in the central nervous system, causing impulses to be sent along a motor neurone to the organ (the effector) that brings about the response.
  • The effector is either a muscle or a gland, a muscle responds by contracting and a gland responds by releasing (secreting) chemical substances.
  • In some cases, the receptor is also the effector, and so the stimuli is immediately responded to due to the rapid speed of the impulses travelling such a short distance.
  • There are no chemicals involved in a simple reflex action, making the reflex action much quicker, and hence why the reflex action is described as simple.

Question 28

Question
Internal conditions of the body that are constantly controlled include which of the following?
Answer
  • The water content of the body.
  • The ion content of the body.
  • Temperature.
  • Blood sugar levels.
  • Neurone activity.
  • White blood cell levels.

Question 29

Question
Which organ helps most in keeping the balance of water and ions in a person's body?
Answer
  • Liver.
  • Kidneys.
  • Lungs.
  • Pancreas.

Question 30

Question
How does the human body maintain water content in the body?
Answer
  • Breathing.
  • Sweating.
  • Urinating.
  • Thinking.
  • Osmosis.

Question 31

Question
An SAS survival manual gives advice on how to conserve water. Which of the following are most likely to be mentioned?
Answer
  • Don't eat.
  • Don't lie on the hot ground.
  • Don't lie in the shade.
  • Avoid exertion.
  • Talk as little as possible.
  • Panting will help.

Question 32

Question
What is the term allocated to the organs a hormone affects?
Answer
  • Target organs.
  • Specified organs.
  • Hormonal organs.
  • Neurone organs.

Question 33

Question
Hormones regulate the functions of many organs and cells. For example, the monthly release of an egg from a woman’s ovaries and the changes in the thickness of the lining of her womb are controlled by hormones secreted by the pituitary gland and by the ovaries. Which of these hormones begins the menstrual cycle?
Answer
  • FSH (Follicle stimulating hormone)
  • Oestrogen
  • LH (Luteinising hormone)

Question 34

Question
Where is oestrogen secreted from?
Answer
  • The ovaries.
  • The pituitary gland.
  • The pancreas.

Question 35

Question
What are the two main hormones that are secreted by the pituitary gland in the menstrual cycle?
Answer
  • Oestrogen
  • FSH
  • LH
  • Adrenaline

Question 36

Question
What is the role played by FSH in the menstrual cycle?
Answer
  • Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) is secreted by the pituitary gland and causes eggs to mature in the ovaries. It also stimulates the ovaries to produce hormones including oestrogen.
  • Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) is secreted by the ovaries and causes eggs to mature in the ovaries. It also stimulates the pituitary gland to produce hormones including oestrogen.
  • Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) stimulates the release of eggs from the ovary.
  • Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) is secreted by the ovaries and inhibits the further production of LH.

Question 37

Question
Where is the pituitary gland located?
Answer
  • In the brain.
  • Next to the pancreas.
  • Just above the ovaries.

Question 38

Question
Hormones are used to help control fertility. They can be used to either as a contraceptive, or as an aid in fertilisation. If hormones are going to be used as a contraceptive, which two hormones might be used to inhibit egg maturation?
Answer
  • Oestrogen
  • FSH
  • Progesterone
  • LH

Question 39

Question
IVF stands for In Vitro Fertilisation.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 40

Question
Which of these answers best describes IVF?
Answer
  • IVF involves giving a mother oestrogen and LH to stimulate the maturation of several eggs. The eggs are collected from the mother and fertilised by sperm from the father. The fertilised eggs develop into foetuses. At the stage when they are properly developed, one or two foetuses are inserted into the mother’s uterus (womb).
  • IVF involves giving a mother FSH and LH to stimulate the maturation of several eggs. The eggs are collected from the mother and fertilised by sperm from the father. The fertilised eggs develop into embryos. At the stage when they are tiny balls of cells, one or two embryos are inserted into the mother’s uterus (womb).
  • IVF involves giving a mother FSH and LH to stimulate the maturation of an egg. The egg is then collected from the mother and fertilised by sperm from the father. The fertilised egg develops into an embryo. At the stage when it is a tiny balls of cells, the embryo is inserted into the mother’s uterus (womb).
  • IVF involves giving a mother a specially developed chemical compound to stimulate the maturation of several eggs. The eggs are collected from the mother and fertilised by sperm from the father. The fertilised eggs develop into embryos. At the stage when they are tiny balls of cells, one or two embryos are inserted into the mother’s uterus (womb).

Question 41

Question
Plants are mostly sensitive to light and moisture, but gravity does not affect them.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 42

Question
Plants produce hormones to coordinate and control growth. What is the name of the hormone which controls phototropism, and gravitropism (or geotropism)?
Answer
  • Auxin
  • Ethylene
  • Jasmonates.

Question 43

Question
Taking the information of this image into account, what would happen to a plant's shoot if there was light to the right of the plant?
Answer
  • Auxins would build up on the left side of the plant, which would cause the shoot to grow to the right.
  • Auxins would build up on the right side of the plant, which would cause the shoot to grow to the right.

Question 44

Question
Plant growth hormones are used in agriculture and horticulture as weed killers and as rooting hormones.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 45

Question
Scientists are continually developing new drugs. When new medical drugs are devised, they have to be extensively tested and trialled before being used. Drugs are tested in a series of stages to find out if they are safe and effective. New drugs are extensively tested for toxicity, efficacy and dose. Which of the following statements best reflects this?
Answer
  • First, drugs are tested in the laboratory, using cells, tissues and eventually live animals
  • In clinical trials involving healthy volunteers and patients. Very low doses of the drug are given at the start of the clinical trial. If the drug is found to be safe, further clinical trials are carried out to find the optimum dose for the drug.
  • Certain drugs can move straight onto human volunteers if the doctors are confident enough that the effects that the drugs will have will not be of any detriment to the volunteer.
  • In some double blind trials, some patients are given a placebo, which does not contain the drug. Neither the doctors nor the patients know who has received a placebo and who has received the drug until the trial is complete.

Question 46

Question
What is the effect the drugs statins have on the human body?
Answer
  • Statins reduce a person's blood cholesterol and therefore greatly reduce their risk of getting heart disease.
  • Statins essentially block synapses, which acts as a pain relief due to the reflex arc being unable to be completed.
  • Statins are drugs which can lead to weight loss, as they deceive the human body into believing it can't consume any more energy from food content for a brief while, which leads people to lose weight when the statins are taken in conjunction with exercise.

Question 47

Question
What was the drug thalidomide first developed for in the 1960s?
Answer
  • It was developed as a sleeping pill.
  • It was developed as a morning sickness aid.
  • It was developed as an aid for leprosy.

Question 48

Question
Alcohol and nicotine cause far more illness and death each year than all the illegal drugs put together.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 49

Question
Some people take drugs because they can make them feel different. This is called recreational drug use, and can refer to both legal and illegal drugs. Of the following substances, which amongst them are legal recreational drugs?
Answer
  • Nicotine.
  • Caffeine.
  • Alcohol.
  • Cannabis.
  • Heroin.
  • Ecstasy.

Question 50

Question
Cannabis smoke contains chemicals which may cause mental illness in some people.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 51

Question
Drugs change the chemical processes in peoples’ bodies so that they may become dependent or addicted to the drug and suffer withdrawal symptoms without them. Which two of these drugs are the most addictive?
Answer
  • Caffeine.
  • Cocaine.
  • Alcohol.
  • Heroin.

Question 52

Question
There are several types of drug that an athlete can use to enhance performance. Some of these drugs are banned by law and some are legally available on prescription, but all are prohibited by sporting regulations. Examples include stimulants that boost bodily functions such as heart rate; and drugs which stimulate muscle growth. Which of the following is a drug that stimulates muscle growth?
Answer
  • Anabolic steroids.
  • Deltoids.
  • Juice.
  • LSD.

Question 53

Question
Unlike animals, plants do not compete with one another.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 54

Question
Animals most often compete for food, territory and what other item from the following list?
Answer
  • Mates.
  • Light.
  • Valuable gemstones.

Question 55

Question
Unlike most animals, microorganisms do not have any adaptations.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 56

Question
What is the term allocated to organisms that live in environments that have very difficult conditions for life?
Answer
  • Extremophile.
  • Xenophile.
  • Beadophile.
  • Oenophile.

Question 57

Question
Animals and plants may be adapted for survival in the conditions where they normally live, e.g. deserts, or the Arctic. Animals may be adapted for survival in dry and arctic environments by means of which of the following?
Answer
  • Changes to surface area
  • Thickness of insulating coat
  • Amount of body fat
  • Camouflage
  • Extensive root systems
  • Changes to surface area, particularly of the leaves