B3 Quiz

Tess Brockway
Quiz by Tess Brockway, updated more than 1 year ago
Tess Brockway
Created by Tess Brockway almost 4 years ago
319
20

Description

GCSE biology (B3) Quiz on B3 Quiz, created by Tess Brockway on 03/26/2016.

Resource summary

Question 1

Question
Osmosis is the movement of [blank_start]water molecules[blank_end] across a [blank_start]partially permeable membrane[blank_end] from an area of high concentration to an area of low concentration.
Answer
  • partially permeable membrane
  • water molecules

Question 2

Question
In the body, how does osmosis work within cells?
Answer
  • Tissue fluid surrounds cells and is composed of water, glucose and oxygen. It comes from the blood capillaries and supplies the body with water it needs by allowing water to move in and out of cells, depending on concentration.
  • Tissue fluid surrounds cells and is composed of water, glucose and carbon dioxide. It comes from the blood capillaries and supplies the body with water it needs by allowing water to move in and out of cells, depending on concentration.
  • Tissue fluid surrounds the cells and is composed of water and glucose. It comes from the blood capillaries and supplies the body with water it needs by allowing water to move in and out of cells, depending on concentration.

Question 3

Question
Active transport is the movement of substances against a concentration gradient.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 4

Question
In root hair cells, the concentration of minerals is usually higher in the cell than in the soil surrounding it. Active transport allows the plant to absorb minerals from a very dilute solution. This is essential for the plant [blank_start]to grow.[blank_end]
Answer
  • to grow.

Question 5

Question
When there's a higher concentration of glucose and amino acids in the gut they diffuse naturally [blank_start]into the blood[blank_end]. If there is a lower concentration of nutrients in the [blank_start]blood[blank_end] than in the [blank_start]gut[blank_end], active transport is necessary to [blank_start]prevent us from starving.[blank_end]
Answer
  • into the blood
  • blood
  • gut
  • prevent us from starving.

Question 6

Question
How are exchange surfaces adapted?
Answer
  • are thick
  • are thin
  • large surface area
  • small surface area
  • maintain a high temperature
  • in animals, they have lots of blood vessels
  • are ventilated
  • don't allow oxygen in or out

Question 7

Question
Active transport is a passive process.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 8

Question
In leaves, carbon dioxide diffuses into the air spaces within the leaf and then into the cells in which [blank_start]photosynthesis[blank_end] happens. The cell walls increase [blank_start]surface area[blank_end] so carbon dioxide is more likely to get through. The bottom of the leaf is covered in [blank_start]stomata[blank_end] which the carbon dioxide diffuses through. Leaves are flat to [blank_start]increase[blank_end] this exchange surface area. Guard cells close the stomata if water is being [blank_start]lost too quickly[blank_end]. [blank_start]Oxygen and water[blank_end] diffuse out through the stomata. Water vapour evaporates from leaf cells and escapes by diffusion.
Answer
  • photosynthesis
  • respiration
  • replication
  • surface area
  • size
  • temperature
  • stomata
  • pigmented green colours
  • stems that act as veins
  • increase
  • decrease
  • maintain
  • lost too quickly
  • absorbed too quickly
  • lost too slowly
  • Oxygen and water vapour
  • Carbon dioxide and oxygen
  • Glucose and water

Question 9

Question
Label the respiratory system.
Answer
  • trachea
  • oesophagus
  • bronchus
  • bronchiole
  • alveoli
  • diaphragm

Question 10

Question
What happens when you breathe in?
Answer
  • intercostal muscles and diaphragm contract
  • intercostal muscles and diaphragm relax
  • thorax volume increases
  • thorax volume decreases
  • pressure increases
  • pressure decreases
  • air is drawn in

Question 11

Question
What happens when you breathe out?
Answer
  • intercostal muscles and diaphragm contract
  • intercostal muscles and diaphragm relax
  • thorax volume increases
  • thorax volume decreases
  • pressure increases
  • pressure decreases
  • air is forced out

Question 12

Question
Artificial ventilators pump air out of the case causing pressure to drop, lungs to expand and air to be drawn in.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 13

Question
New ventilators pump air into the lungs causing the ribcage to expand, air to be drawn in. To breathe out, the ribcage relaxes.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 14

Question
Which system could interfere with blood flow to the lower body?
Answer
  • Iron lung
  • new ventilators

Question 15

Question
[blank_start]New ventilators[blank_end] could cause damage, for example they could burst alveoli, if the lungs can't cope with artificial air flow.
Answer
  • New ventilators
  • Iron lungs

Question 16

Question
The alveoli are small air sacs inside your [blank_start]lungs[blank_end]. Inside them, gas exchange takes place wherein [blank_start]oxygen[blank_end] is transferred to the blood and [blank_start]carbon dioxide[blank_end] is removed. They are adapted for efficient diffusion as they have a large [blank_start]surface area[blank_end], moist [blank_start]lining[blank_end], [blank_start]thin[blank_end] walls and good [blank_start]blood[blank_end] supply.
Answer
  • lungs
  • oxygen
  • carbon dioxide
  • surface area
  • lining
  • thin
  • blood

Question 17

Question
The small intestine is covered in millions of projections called [blank_start]villi[blank_end]. They increase the small intestine's [blank_start]surface area[blank_end] in order to speed up [blank_start]digestion[blank_end]. The have a [blank_start]single[blank_end] layer of surface cells so there isn't long for food to diffuse through, and a good [blank_start]blood supply[blank_end] for quick absorption.
Answer
  • villi
  • surface area
  • digestion
  • single
  • blood supply

Question 18

Question
Which plant vessel is made of columns of living cells that transports food from leaves to growing regions and storage organs in both directions?
Answer
  • Xylem
  • Phloem

Question 19

Question
Xylem vessels are dead cells joined end to end with no middle that carry water and minerals from the roots to the stem and leaves in the transpiration stream.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 20

Question
What is transpiration?
Answer
  • When plants lose water by active transport and diffusion.
  • When plants transfer water throughout their organs.
  • When plants lose water by evaporation and diffusion.
  • When plants receive more water by osmosis.

Question 21

Question
The transpiration stream happens through [blank_start]xylem[blank_end] vessels when there is a [blank_start]water[blank_end] shortage in a plant and it is therefore necessary for these vessels to replace it.
Answer
  • xylem
  • water

Question 22

Question
Describe the double circulatory system: [blank_start]Deoxygenated[blank_end] blood is pumped to the lungs to receive [blank_start]oxygen[blank_end]. The newly [blank_start]oxygenated[blank_end] blood returns to the heart. This oxygenated blood is pumped to [blank_start]all other body organs[blank_end]. It gives up its oxygen at the [blank_start]body[blank_end] cells and becomes [blank_start]deoxygenated[blank_end]. The system repeats in a cycle.
Answer
  • Deoxygenated
  • Oxygenated
  • oxygen
  • carbon dioxide
  • oxygenated
  • deoxygenated
  • all other body organs
  • the kidney, the liver and some muscles.
  • the lungs.
  • body
  • blood
  • deoxygenated
  • oxygenated

Question 23

Question
How does the heart work? Blood flows into the [blank_start]atria[blank_end] from the [blank_start]vena cava[blank_end] and the [blank_start]pulmonary vein[blank_end]. The [blank_start]atria[blank_end] contract which pushes blood into the [blank_start]ventricle[blank_end]. The [blank_start]ventricles[blank_end] contract which forces blood into the [blank_start]pulmonary artery[blank_end] and the [blank_start]aorta[blank_end] and out of the [blank_start]heart[blank_end]. Blood flows to organs through [blank_start]arteries[blank_end]. Blood returns to the heart through [blank_start]veins[blank_end]. The [blank_start]atria[blank_end] fill again and the cycle repeats.
Answer
  • atria
  • vena cava
  • pulmonary vein
  • atria
  • ventricle
  • ventricles
  • pulmonary artery
  • aorta
  • heart
  • arteries
  • veins
  • atria

Question 24

Question
Which blood vessel has thick layers of muscle for strong walls due to high blood pressure, as well as elastic fibres for this same reason? Hint: it carries blood away from the heart.
Answer
  • arteries
  • capillaries
  • veins

Question 25

Question
Which blood vessel supplies food/oxygen to your cells whilst removing waste like carbon dioxide, all by diffusion? Hint: it has permeable walls and is usually only one cell thick.
Answer
  • arteries
  • capillaries
  • veins

Question 26

Question
Which blood vessel has low blood pressure so has walls which aren't very thick, but despite this has a big lumen to help the blood flow through? Hint: it takes blood back to the heart and contains valves so blood flows in the right direction.
Answer
  • arteries
  • capillaries
  • veins

Question 27

Question
Red blood cells carry oxygen from the lungs to all other cells in your body, so the more you've got, the more oxygen can get to your cells. How are red blood cells adapted for their function?
Answer
  • caved in shape to give them a large surface area to absorb more oxygen
  • no nucleus so more oxygen can be carried
  • the nucleus is suited to carry oxygen
  • red pigment called haemoglobin which combines with oxygen in the lungs to become oxyhaemoglobin (happens reverse in body tissues as oxyhemoglobin splits up into haemoglobin and oxygen so the oxygen can be released into your cells)

Question 28

Question
White blood cells have a nucleus. How do they defend against disease?
Answer
  • change shape to engulf foreign microorganisms
  • produce antibodies to fight microorganisms
  • produce antitoxins to neutralise toxins produced by microorganisms

Question 29

Question
Platelets are small fragments of cells without a nucleus. They help to clot your blood. What can a lack of platelets in your blood lead to?
Answer
  • Your blood wouldn't be able to clot so you could bleed out and microorganisms could get in.
  • Your blood wouldn't be able to clot so you could spread disease easily.
  • Your blood wouldn't be able to clot so it would be more likely for you to get cut in the future.

Question 30

Question
Plasma carries a lot of stuff in your blood. It is a pale straw coloured liquid. What does it carry?
Answer
  • Red blood cells
  • White blood cells
  • Platelets
  • carbon dioxide from the organs to the lungs.
  • urea from the liver to the kidneys.
  • hormones
  • antibodies and antitoxins produced by the white blood cells
  • nutrients such as glucose and amino acids which are soluble products of digestion, absorbed from the gut and taken in the plasma to the cells of the body.

Question 31

Question
What is the purpose of artificial blood?
Answer
  • to replace the lost volume of blood
  • to replace the function of the red blood cells
  • to replace the function of the white blood cells

Question 32

Question
Artificial blood is often used in [blank_start]emergency[blank_end] situations wherein a patient is [blank_start]losing[blank_end] a lot of blood. It buys the patient time to produce new [blank_start]blood cells[blank_end] so the heart can continue pumping. It is relatively safe, as long as there are no [blank_start]air bubbles[blank_end] present in the artificial blood.
Answer
  • emergency
  • losing
  • blood cells
  • air bubbles

Question 33

Question
Sometimes patients need to receive an artificial heart. Tick what is correct.
Answer
  • an artificial heart is a mechanical device that pumps blood when a person's heart fails
  • they are always temporary-patients only have an artificial heart whilst waiting for a donor
  • they are less likely to be rejected by the patient's immune system than donor hearts
  • they're made of metal or plastic
  • surgery can lead to bleeding and infection
  • they've been designed so their parts never wear out
  • patient's need to take blood thinners because blood doesn't flow through as smoothly

Question 34

Question
Deffective heart valves can be replaced with [blank_start]mechanical valves[blank_end]. Although it is a less drastic procedure than a [blank_start]heart[blank_end] transplant, it is still major surgery and there is a risk of [blank_start]blood clots[blank_end].
Answer
  • mechanical valves
  • stents
  • artificial hearts
  • heart
  • blood
  • artery
  • blood clots
  • rejection
  • them being ineffective

Question 35

Question
[blank_start]Stents[blank_end] are tubes inserted into the arteries to keep blocked arteries open so [blank_start]blood[blank_end] can pass through and the heart can continue beating. They are used to prevent heart attacks in people with [blank_start]coronary heart[blank_end] disease (fatty deposits blocking arteries) however if [blank_start]scar tissue[blank_end] forms due to stent irritation, the artery can narrow again. Drugs are needed to prevent [blank_start]blood clots[blank_end].
Answer
  • Stents
  • blood
  • coronary heart
  • scar tissue
  • blood clots

Question 36

Question
Homeostasis is the maintenance of [blank_start]a constant internal environment[blank_end].
Answer
  • a constant internal environment

Question 37

Question
Homeostasis controls many things in your internal body environment, including temperature. Tick the boxes that describe what happens when your body gets too hot. Do not tick the boxes that describe what happens when your body gets too cold.
Answer
  • hairs lie flat
  • sweat glands produce sweat which evaporates
  • blood vessels supplying the skin dilate so more blood can flow close to the surface
  • hairs stand up
  • blood vessels supplying skin capillaries constrict to close off skin's blood supply
  • your body uses methods which require respiration which in turn produces energy

Question 38

Question
Homeostasis maintains a constant internal environment in your body by controlling the following six things. What do the kidneys do in relation?
Answer
  • Maintain body temperature
  • Adjust water content as necessary
  • Adjust ion content as necessary
  • Keep the blood sugar level within certain limits
  • Remove carbon dioxide
  • Remove Urea

Question 39

Question
Your kidneys regulate the water content in your body. Water is taken in by [blank_start]food[blank_end] and [blank_start]drink[blank_end], and lost in [blank_start]urine[blank_end], [blank_start]sweat[blank_end] and the air we breathe out. On a cold day you don't sweat so you produce [blank_start]more[blank_end] urine which is [blank_start]pale[blank_end] and [blank_start]dilute[blank_end]. On a hot day you do sweat so you produce [blank_start]less[blank_end] urine which is [blank_start]dark coloured[blank_end] and [blank_start]concentrated[blank_end].
Answer
  • food
  • drink
  • urine
  • sweat
  • more
  • pale
  • dilute
  • less
  • dark coloured
  • concentrated

Question 40

Question
Your kidneys regulate the ion content in your body. Ions are taken in in [blank_start]food[blank_end] and absorbed into the [blank_start]blood[blank_end]. If there is an incorrect balance of water and ions in your body, the wrong amount of water will be drawn into your cells by [blank_start]osmosis[blank_end] which can [blank_start]damage[blank_end] your cells or make them not work as well. Your kidneys remove excess sodium from the [blank_start]blood[blank_end]. Some ions are lost in [blank_start]sweat[blank_end].
Answer
  • food
  • blood
  • osmosis
  • damage
  • blood
  • sweat

Question 41

Question
Your kidneys remove urea from your body. Urea is produced as a waste product in the reaction of [blank_start]proteins[blank_end] being converted to [blank_start]fats[blank_end] and [blank_start]carbohydrates[blank_end] to be stored. This reaction takes place in the [blank_start]liver[blank_end]. Urea is poisonous. The [blank_start]liver[blank_end] first releases it into the [blank_start]bloodstream[blank_end], then the kidneys filter out the [blank_start]blood[blank_end] and temporarily store it in the [blank_start]bladder[blank_end] in urine to be excreted from the body.
Answer
  • proteins
  • fats
  • carbohydrates
  • liver
  • liver
  • bloodstream
  • bladder
  • blood

Question 42

Question
[blank_start]Nephrons[blank_end] are the filtration units in the kidneys.
Answer
  • Nephrons

Question 43

Question
The kidneys act as a filter in three stages. These are [blank_start]ultrafiltration[blank_end], [blank_start]reabsorption[blank_end] and the [blank_start]release of wastes[blank_end].
Answer
  • ultrafiltration
  • reabsorption
  • release of wastes

Question 44

Question
During filtration, a high pressure squeezes water, [blank_start]urea[blank_end], [blank_start]ions[blank_end] and sugar out of the blood and into the [blank_start]Bowman's capsule[blank_end]. [blank_start]Big[blank_end] molecules cannot get through so proteins and blood cells stay in the blood.
Answer
  • Bowman's capsule
  • urea
  • ions
  • Big

Question 45

Question
During reabsorption, [blank_start]useful[blank_end] substances are reabsorbed into the blood. These include all [blank_start]sugars[blank_end] and sufficient [blank_start]ions[blank_end] (both by [blank_start]active transport[blank_end]), as well as sufficient [blank_start]water[blank_end].
Answer
  • useful
  • sugars
  • ions
  • active transport
  • water

Question 46

Question
During the release of wastes in the kidneys, [blank_start]remaining[blank_end] substances (including [blank_start]urea[blank_end]) continue out the nephron, into the ureter and down to the bladder as [blank_start]urine[blank_end].
Answer
  • remaining
  • urea
  • urine

Question 47

Question
Dialysis is one way to treat kidney failure. The person's blood flows along a [blank_start]selectively permeable[blank_end] barrier surrounded by dialysis fluid. It acts like the [blank_start]membranes[blank_end] in the kidneys by being permeable to things like [blank_start]ions[blank_end] and waste substances, but not allowing [blank_start]big[blank_end] molecules through. Dissolved ions and glucose aren't lost from the blood during dialysis because the dialysis fluid has the [blank_start]same[blank_end] concentration of them as healthy blood. Waste substances and excess ions/water can [blank_start]diffuse[blank_end] across the barrier. Although this saves lives, it's a hassle as patients go three times a week for hours. Dialysis can cause [blank_start]blood clots[blank_end] or infections.
Answer
  • selectively permeable
  • big
  • ions
  • same
  • diffuse
  • blood clots
  • membranes

Question 48

Question
A kidney transplant will [blank_start]cure[blank_end] kidney failure. A donor who has died suddenly or is on the organ donor register gives a healthy kidney to a patient with kidney failure. The donor kidney could be [blank_start]rejected[blank_end] by the patient's immune system as the patient's [blank_start]antibodies[blank_end] attack the donor kidney's foreign [blank_start]antigens[blank_end]. This can be prevented if the donor's tissue type [blank_start]closely matches[blank_end] the patient's tissue type, or if the patient takes [blank_start]immune-suppressing drugs[blank_end]. These make them [blank_start]more[blank_end] susceptible to illness. Dialysis [blank_start]is not[blank_end] necessary with a kidney transplant.
Answer
  • cure
  • rejected
  • antibodies
  • antigens
  • closely matches
  • immune-suppressing drugs
  • more
  • is not

Question 49

Question
What removes blood glucose from the blood? If not ticked, it adds glucose the blood.
Answer
  • eating foods containing carbohydrate
  • the normal metabolism of cells
  • vigorous exercise

Question 50

Question
What happens when the blood glucose level is too high?
Answer
  • insulin is secreted by the pancreas
  • glucagon is secreted by the pancreas
  • glucose is added by the liver
  • glucose is removed by the liver
  • the liver turns glucose into glycogen
  • the liver turns glycogen into glucose

Question 51

Question
When the blood glucose level is too high, [blank_start]insulin[blank_end] is secreted by the [blank_start]pancreas[blank_end]. Glucose is therefore [blank_start]removed[blank_end] by the [blank_start]liver[blank_end] as insulin caused the [blank_start]liver[blank_end] to turn [blank_start]glucose[blank_end] into [blank_start]glycogen[blank_end].
Answer
  • insulin
  • glucagon
  • pancreas
  • liver
  • removed
  • added
  • liver
  • pancreas
  • liver
  • pancreas
  • glucose
  • glycogen
  • glycogen
  • glucose

Question 52

Question
When the blood glucose level is too low, [blank_start]glucagon[blank_end] is secreted by the pancreas. Glucose is therefore [blank_start]added[blank_end] by the liver as [blank_start]glucagon[blank_end] caused the liver to turn [blank_start]glycogen[blank_end] into [blank_start]glucose[blank_end].
Answer
  • glucagon
  • insulin
  • added
  • removed
  • glucagon
  • insulin
  • glycogen
  • glucose
  • glucose
  • glycogen

Question 53

Question
Type 1 Diabetes is caused when the pancreas doesn't produce enough [blank_start]insulin[blank_end] so blood glucose levels can [blank_start]rise[blank_end] to a deathly level.
Answer
  • insulin
  • rise

Question 54

Question
How can we control Type 1 Diabetes?
Answer
  • liver transplant
  • limiting simple carbohydrates
  • eating more sugary foods
  • regular exercise
  • injecting insulin several times a day
  • pancreas transplant
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