Oxyurids, Spirurids, and Trichinella spiralis

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Veterinary Medicine Flashcards on Oxyurids, Spirurids, and Trichinella spiralis, created by Cassie Bowling on 11/27/2018.
Cassie Bowling
Flashcards by Cassie Bowling, updated more than 1 year ago
Cassie Bowling
Created by Cassie Bowling almost 4 years ago
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Oxyuris equi Course in body Definitive Host Life Cycle Clinical Signs Diagnosis Treatment Zoonotic? Large Equine Pinworm Through full GI tract to anus Horse Direct cycle: Eggs deposited in perianal region, eggs embryonate, fall into bedding/feed/water, eggs ingested and hatch in small intestine, enter crypts of cecum/ventral colon, enter lumen and move to dorsal colon to develop to adults Clinical signs: larvae cause localized tissue reactions, pruritis ani, alopecia, hyperkeratosis, secondary bacterial infection, restlessness, anorexia Diagnosis: Eggs at perineum or in feces, history/signs Treatment: Anthelmintics, prevent fecal contaminations, regular washing of perianal skin and under tail. Not zoonotic
Oxyuris equi
Oxyuris equi
Habronema/Draschia megastoma Distribution Course in body Definitive Host Life Cycle Clinical Signs Diagnosis Treatment Zoonotic? Stomach worms Worldwide Stomach Horses Indirect Cycle: Eggs produced in the stomach hatch in the intestine, larvae emerge and eaten by maggots-L1-L2-L3, escape when fly feeds or stay in fly in water (if around mouth, both cases lead to adults in stomach, can also wind up in skin, lungs, or eyes via wounds. Clinical signs: (rarely) chronic gastritis with ulcerations, pulmonary granulomas, summer sores, granular dermatitis Diagnosis: Eggs/larvae in feces, gastric lavage Treatment: Ivermectin/moxidectin, cryotherapy, corticosteroids, fly control, compost manure
Physaloptera spp. Course in body Definitive Host Life Cycle Clinical Signs Diagnosis Treatment Zoonotic? Stomach worms US and Canada Stomach Dogs and Cats Indirect cycle: Egg with L1 in feces, ingested by insect-L2-L3-encysted, eaten by paratenic host or directly by definitive host, hatch and mature in stomach Clinical signs: vomiting Diagnosis: Fecal float, endoscopy Treatment: Ivermectin, fenbendazole, pyrantel pamoate, prevent predation
Physaloptera spp.
Trichinella spiralis Distribution Course in body Definitive Host Life Cycle Clinical Signs Diagnosis Treatment Zoonotic? Worldwide Stomach to striated muscle to small intestine Mammals Indirect Cycle: Larvae deposited in intestinal wall, enter lymphatics, thoracic duct, heart, lungs, heart, systemic circulation, encyst in striated muscle, intermediate host eaten, larvae emerge in small intestine and mature. Clinical signs: Decreased gain, intense muscle pain, nonspecific enteritis, diarrhea, abdominal pain, fever, myositis, circumorbital edema Diagnosis: Symptoms, ELISA, intradermal test, muscle biopsy Treatment: (humans) pred, ivermectin, thiabendazole, mebendazole, albendazole, analgesics, cook meat Zoonotic
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