Parasitology Whips and Capillarids

Cassie Bowling
Flashcards by , created 7 months ago

Brief overview of whips and capillarids

4
0
0
Cassie Bowling
Created by Cassie Bowling 7 months ago
History of Veterinary Medicine
vickiet.93
Parasitology - MU Sofia - part 3 (970-1093)
Стефан Радев
The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA)
vickiet.93
Carbohydrates
Jubby
GCSE AQA Physics 2 Circuits
Lilac Potato
Parasitology - Practical
Sole C
Parasitology - MU Sofia - part 1 (552-751)
Стефан Радев
Parasitology - Practical
Nicole Adamou
parasitology quiz
atbaa2020asu
Parasitology - MU Sofia - part 2 (752-969)
Стефан Радев
Question Answer
Egg (binary/octet-stream) Trichuris spp. (dark, smooth shell, 1 cell stage, football shaped)
Egg (binary/octet-stream) Trichuris spp. (Small, thin anterior end, whip shape)
Egg (binary/octet-stream) Capillarids (smaller than whips, asymmetrical, flattened bipolar plugs, textured cell surface)
Egg (binary/octet-stream) Dioctophhyme renale (thick, pitted surface, 1 or 2 cell shape, brownish, indistinct bipolar plugs, barrel looking)
Egg (binary/octet-stream) Dioctophhyme renale (giant, redish, females larger, males with bell shaped bursa and a spicule)
Trichuris spp. Distribution Course in body Definitive Host Life Cycle Clinical Signs Diagnosis Treatment Zoonotic? Whipworms Worldwide Small intestine to cecum Mammals Direct Cycle: Egg passed in feces, infective larvae develop in egg in environment,dog ingests egg, mature in large intestine, fix in mucosa. Clinical signs: Hemorrhagic typhlitis, colitis, bloody diarrhea, weight loss, dehydration. Diagnosis: Fecal float, antigen, ID adults Treatment: Some heartworm preventions, fenbendazole/febantel, macrocyclic lactones, fenbendazole, dichlorvos, prompt removal of feces, routine deworming Zoonotic
Capillarids Distribution Course in body Definitive Host Treatment Zoonotic? Hairworms Worldwide Varies Mammals Treatment: fenbendazole, ivermectin, topical imidacloprid/moxidectin in cats, prevent predation Zoonotic
Eucoleus spp. Course in body Definitive Host Life Cycle Clinical Signs Diagnosis Capillarid Gi tract to respiratory tract Canine/Feline (E. aerophilus), Canine (E. boehmi) Direct cycle: Egg passed in feces, embryonates, eaten by host, hatch in small intestine, migrate to respiratory tract Clinical signs: Bronchitis/tracheitis, cough, dyspnea, anorexia, nasal discharge, sneezing Diagnosis: Fecal float
Pearsonema spp. Course in body Definitive Host Life Cycle Clinical Signs Diagnosis Capillarid GI tract to urinary tract Dogs/Cats(P. plica), Cats(P.feliscati) Indirect cycle: Egg passed in feces, embryonates, eaten by earthworm, eaten by host, hatch in small intestine, migrate to urinary tract Clinical signs: Cystitis Diagnosis: Urine sediment
Aonchotheca spp. Course in body Definitive Host Life Cycle Clinical Signs Diagnosis Capillarid GI tract Cats, swine, ruminants Direct cycle: Egg passed in feces, embryonates, eaten by host, hatch in small intestine, migrate to stomach/small intestine Clinical signs: Gastritis Diagnosis: Fecal Float
Dioctophyme renale Distribution Course in body Definitive Host Life Cycle Clinical Signs Diagnosis Treatment Zoonotic? Giant Kidney Worm Worldwide Stomach to liver to kidney (sometimes abdomen) Carnivores Indirect cycle: Unembryonated egg in urine, embryonate in water, ingested by earthworm, eaten by intermediate or definitive host, stomach-liver-kidney. Clinical signs: Pressure necrosis of right kidney, hypertrophy of left kidney, dysuria, hematuria, lumbar pain, peritonitis, hemoperitoneum from abdominal infection, vomiting. Diagnosis: Incidental during surgery, urine sediment, rads or ultrasound Treament: surgical removal of worm and kidney, prevent predation Zoonotic