MODALS OF DEDUCTION AND ADJECTIUVES SUFIXES

Michael Blur
Mind Map by Michael Blur, updated more than 1 year ago
Michael Blur
Created by Michael Blur about 5 years ago
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MODALS OF DEDUCTION AND ADJECTIUVES SUFIXES
1 ADJECTIVES SUFFIXES:we often use a noun plus a suffix to make an adjective. we often use -ful to form adjectives that mean "with "or "full of" and less to form adjectives that mean "without".
1.1 FULL:
1.1.1 The suffix -ful has been derived from the English word "full" and the literal meaning is "full of". Some meanings are can be a little more abstract and it may be harder to understand the meaning the first time you meet these words.
1.1.1.1 for example:power→ powerful
1.2 LESS:
1.2.1 The suffix -less has been derived from the English word "less" and the literal meaning is "without" or "lacking". Some meanings are more abstract. For example the suffix -less can mean "unable to act or be acted on in a specified way"
1.2.1.1 for example:law→ lawless
2 MODALS OF DEDUCTION: We use modal verbs to say how sure we are about something.
2.1 We use must when we feel sure that something is true because there’s very strong evidence. EXAMPLE:He must live near here because he comes to work on foot. We don’t know where he lives but we’re sure it’s not far away.
3 might, may, could
3.1 We use might, may or could to say that we think something is possible but we’re not sure.
3.1.1 EXAMPLE:Don’t put it up there. It could fall off and hit someone. Might, may and could are also followed by an infinitive without ‘to’.
4 can’t
4.1 We use can’t when we feel sure something is not true.
4.1.1 EXAMPLE: It can’t be a burglar. All the doors and windows are locked. He doesn’t know it’s not a burglar but he feels sure it’s not.
5 In the same way that we use modal verbs to say how certain we are about things in the present we can also use them to speculate about the past.
5.1 (‘have done’, ‘have been’ have stolen’ etc.) is called the perfect infinitive
5.1.1 must + perfect infinitive We use must + perfect infinitive when we feel sure about something in the past. EXAMPLE:You must have been delighted when you heard you’d won the lottery.
5.1.1.1 might/may/could + perfect infinitive: We use might, may or could with the perfect infinitive to say that we think something was possible but we aren’t sure.
5.1.1.2 can’t + perfect infinitive We use can’t + perfect infinitive: when we feel sure something didn’t happen in the past.
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