Plant reproduction

Shubh Malde
Mind Map by Shubh Malde, updated more than 1 year ago
Shubh Malde
Created by Shubh Malde about 6 years ago
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Plant reproduction

Resource summary

Plant reproduction
  1. A plants anther produce the male sex cell (pollen) and the ovary makes the female sex cells (in the ovule)
    1. Fertilisation-A pollen grain starts to grow if it lands on the stigma of a flower of the correct species. A pollen tube grows through the tissues of the flower until it reaches an ovule inside the ovary. The nucleus of the pollen grain (the male gamete) then passes along the pollen tube and joins with the nucleus of the ovule (the female gamete). This process is called fertilisation.
      1. After fertilisation ovules become seeds and the ovary wall forms the rest of the fruit.
        1. Plants compete with each other for factors such as: light, water, space and minerals in the soil
          1. Seeds must be dispersed or spread away from each other and from the parent plant. This is to reduce competition between the parent plant and the new plants, and between the new plants.
            1. Dispersion methods are wind, animal (in and out) and self-propelled (like a bomb)
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