The Concert of Europe - British Geopolitical Order (1815-75)

Itzi Mh
Mind Map by , created about 4 years ago

The Concert of Europe - British Geopolitical Order (1815-75)

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Itzi Mh
Created by Itzi Mh about 4 years ago
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The Concert of Europe - British Geopolitical Order (1815-75)
1 Strong evidence for the view that there are alternatives to rules of governance
1.1 Total anarchy
1.2 Strict hierarchy
2 No one state "laid down the law" for the continent as a whole and an emerging British economic hegemony in much of the rest of the world.
3 BRITAIN
3.1 World power did not translate into continental hegemony
3.2 After 1875: The concert and British economy hegemony decayed
3.2.1 By 1875 Britain had also turned away from Europe and the United States towards its empire and those world regions where its hegemony was apparently more secure. This provided the impetus for the collapse of the Concert in Europe and the beginning of a British retreat from its constitutive role in the international political economy.
3.3 NAVAL POWER
3.4 Britain not only experienced an Industrial Revolution it also traded with and invested in other continents on a much larger scale than other European countries.
3.4.1 The technical innovation and organizational efficiency of early nineteenth-century British industry produced goods for export and capital for investment overseas and a demand for certain raw materials.
3.4.2 Britain acquired a competitive advantage over other European states in the growing world economy.
3.5 From 1823 to 1840 through the sponsorship and unilateral practice of freer trade, British leaders created a worldwide network of trade and financial flows that presented their centrality as a byproduct of the workings of a "world market" that operated to the benefit of all.
3.5.1 Under British auspices market exchange was effectively globalized as production for the market replaced the mere trading of goods. The British national economy became the locomotive of the world economy.
3.6 Internationalization of the British economy
3.6.1 Crucial element in the quickening pace and increasing spatial scope of the world economy
3.6.2 In the 1870s Britain began to lose its central position within the Concert of Europe and also to sacrifice its industrial strength on the altar of free trade.
3.6.3 British concentration on the "old" industrial technologies of the steam era and its increased commitment to such geographically extensive activities as commerce and finance put it at a disadvantage relative to the two massive territorial economies with which it now had to compete.
4 Governance system (19th century): Polyarchy
5 Mainly created to handle revolution
5.1 There was an agreement that this meant preventing a French way of revenge or the restoration of the regime of Napoleon Bonaparte
5.2 Disagreement over the extent to which this justified unilateral interventions in small states to suppress rebellion.
5.3 Certain rules of behavior became widely accepted and unilateral responses were decried.
6 A consensus evolved among the dominant political elites in Europe:
6.1 1. No one state in Europe could predominate within the continent.
6.2 2. Europe-wide wars were best avoided because of their potential for unleashing revolutionary forces.
7 One of the most important aspects of the Concert constructed in 1814-15 was its territorial equilibrium of power.
8 The main measure of state power was maintenance of national territory.

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