Merrill's Chapter 8

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Quiz by Korie Hi, updated more than 1 year ago More Less
Korie Hi
Created by Korie Hi almost 3 years ago
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Question 1

Question
Label the image
Answer
  • Cervical
  • Thoracic
  • Lumbar
  • Sacrum
  • Coccyx

Question 2

Question
What are the function(s) of the vertebral column?
Answer
  • Encloses and protects the spinal cord
  • Acts as as support for the trunk
  • Supports the skull
  • Provides attachment for the deep muscles of the back and ribs laterally

Question 3

Question
What holds the vertebral column together?
Answer
  • Tendons
  • Cartilage
  • Ligaments
  • Muscle

Question 4

Question
How many vertebrae make up the sacrum?
Answer
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

Question 5

Question
The coccyx is made up of 3 vertebrae.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 6

Question
The 24 vertebral segments in the upper three regions are termed the [blank_start]true[blank_end] or [blank_start]movable[blank_end] vertebrae. The pelvic segments in the lower regions are called [blank_start]false[blank_end] or [blank_start]fixed[blank_end] vertebrae.
Answer
  • true
  • false
  • movable
  • fixed
  • false
  • true
  • fixed
  • movable

Question 7

Question
The vertebral column is made up of three curves.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 8

Question
The cervical and lumbar curves, which are [blank_start]convex[blank_end] anteriorly, are called [blank_start]lordotic[blank_end] curves. The thoracic and pelvic curves are [blank_start]concave[blank_end] anteriorly and are called [blank_start]kyphotic[blank_end] curves
Answer
  • convex
  • concave
  • lordotic
  • kyphotic
  • concave
  • convex
  • kyphotic
  • lordotic

Question 9

Question
The [blank_start]thoracic[blank_end] and [blank_start]pelvic[blank_end] curves are called primary curves because they are present at birth. The [blank_start]cervical[blank_end] and [blank_start]lumbar[blank_end] curves are called secondary or compensatory curves because they develop after birth.
Answer
  • thoracic
  • cervical
  • lumbar
  • pelvic
  • sacral
  • lumbar
  • cervical
  • pelvic
  • thoracic
  • lumbar
  • sacral
  • thoracic

Question 10

Question
The [blank_start]cervical[blank_end] curve, which is the least pronounced of the curves, develops when an infant begins to hold the head up at about [blank_start]3[blank_end] or [blank_start]4[blank_end] months of age and begins to sit alone at about [blank_start]8[blank_end] or [blank_start]9[blank_end] months of age. The [blank_start]lumbar[blank_end] curve develops when the child begins to walk at about [blank_start]1[blank_end] to [blank_start]1.5[blank_end] years of age.
Answer
  • cervical
  • thoracic
  • lumbar
  • lumbar
  • cervical
  • thoracic
  • 3
  • 2
  • 1
  • 4
  • 4
  • 5
  • 3
  • 2
  • 8
  • 6
  • 7
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 10
  • 11
  • 1
  • 0.5
  • 2
  • 1.5
  • 1.5
  • 2
  • 2.5
  • 3

Question 11

Question
The lumbar and pelvic curves are more pronounced in females, who have a more acute angle at the lumbosacral junction.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 12

Question
Any abnormal increase in the anterior concavity (or posterior convexity) of the thoracic curve is termed [blank_start]kyphosis[blank_end]. Any abnormal increase in the anterior convexity (or posterior concavity) of the lumbar or cervical curve is termed [blank_start]lordosis[blank_end].
Answer
  • kyphosis
  • lordosis
  • lordosis
  • kyphosis

Question 13

Question
The superior and inferior surfaces of the vertebra bodies are flattened and are covered by a thin layer of articular cartilage.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 14

Question
In the articulated spine, the vertebral bodies are separated by intervertebral disks, forming the cartilaginous interver­tebral joints. These disks account for approximately one fourth of the length of the vertebral column. Each disk has a central mass of soft, pulpy, semigelatinous material called the [blank_start]nucleus pulposus[blank_end], which is surrounded by an outer fibrocartilaginous disk called the [blank_start]anulus fibrosus[blank_end].
Answer
  • nucleus pulposus
  • anulus fibrosus
  • anulus fibrosus
  • nucleus pulposus

Question 15

Question
It is common for the pulpy nucleus to rupture or protrude into the vertebral canal, impinging on a spinal nerve. This condition is called herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) or, more commonly, [blank_start]slipped disk[blank_end].
Answer
  • slipped disk

Question 16

Question
The vertebral arch is formed by two pedicles and two laminae that support four articular processes, two transverse processes, and one spinous process.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 17

Question
A congenital defect of the vertebral column in which the laminae fail to unite posteriorly at the midline is called [blank_start]spina bifida[blank_end].
Answer
  • spina bifida

Question 18

Question
What cervical vertebra is a ringlike structure with no body and a very short spinous process?
Answer
  • Atlas
  • Axis

Question 19

Question
Which cervical vertebra is termed the vertebra prominens?
Answer
  • C3
  • C5
  • C7
  • C1

Question 20

Question
The bodies of the typical ([blank_start]third through ninth[blank_end]) thoracic vertebrae are approximately triangular in form.
Answer
  • third through ninth
  • third through eleventh
  • second through ninth
  • fourth through twelfth

Question 21

Question
Although the size and degree of curvature of the sacrum vary considerably in different patients, the bone is normally longer, narrower, more evenly curved, and more vertical in position in [blank_start]males[blank_end] than in [blank_start]females[blank_end].
Answer
  • males
  • females
  • females
  • males

Question 22

Question
The male sacrum is more acutely curved.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 23

Question
Which of the following are cartilaginous joints?
Answer
  • Intervertebral
  • Zygapophyseal
  • Atlantoaxial
  • Costovertebral

Question 24

Question
The atlantoaxial joint is both a gliding and pivot type of joint.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 25

Question
The zygapophyseal joint is the only slightly movable joint.
Answer
  • True
  • False

Question 26

Question
[blank_start]Jefferson[blank_end]: Comminuted fracture of the ring of C1. [blank_start]Sponylolisthesis[blank_end]: Forward displacement of a vertebra over a lower vertebra. [blank_start]Spina bifida[blank_end]: Failure of the posterior encasement of the spinal cord to close. [blank_start]Hangman's[blank_end]: Fracture of the anterior arch of C2 owing to hyperextension. [blank_start]Spondylolysis[blank_end]: Breaking down of the vertebra. [blank_start]Subluxation[blank_end]: Incomplete or partial dislocation. [blank_start]Scoliosis[blank_end]: Lateral deviation of the spine with possible vertebral rotation. [blank_start]Clay shoveler's[blank_end]: Avulsion fracture of the spinous process in the lower cervical and upper thoracic region. [blank_start]Scheuermann disease[blank_end]: Kyphosis with onset in adolescence.
Answer
  • Jefferson
  • Sponylolisthesis
  • Spina bifida
  • Hangman's
  • Spondylolysis
  • Subluxation
  • Scoliosis
  • Clay shoveler's
  • Scheuermann disease
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