United Nations Convention of the Rights of the Child

selinaward
Mind Map by , created over 6 years ago

K218 Working with children, young people and families Mind Map on United Nations Convention of the Rights of the Child, created by selinaward on 05/10/2013.

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selinaward
Created by selinaward over 6 years ago
web of relationships
ibiorban
Social Pedagogy
ibiorban
Skills and strategies for practice
ibiorban
GCSE CHEMISTRY UNIT 2 STRUCTURE AND BONDING
ktmoo.poppypoo
All Edexcel GCSE PE key terms
Millie Berrett
Knowledge, skills and vales for good practice
selinaward
Law, social policy and practice
selinaward
A critical understanding of policy practice and service
ibiorban
Web of relationships/Social ecological perspective
selinaward
Social Pedagogy
selinaward
United Nations Convention of the Rights of the Child
1 Throughout the module, we referred to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC).
1.1 Although not a law, it is an influential, universally-agreed set of standards and obligations incorporating civil, cultural, economic, political and social rights
2 The three Ps are provision, protection and participation, each of which covers a number of articles from the UNCRC
2.1 Provision
2.1.1 It is the states duty to provide free and compulsarly primary education
2.1.1.1 Practitioners working with families from minority groups (such as Mags the traveller lady) should try to maintain good practice and democratic values by respecting diversity and promoting inclusion. For instance, this could be achieved by ensuring these families are aware of, and have access to, the same services as non-minority families e.g. health, education and social care services. This utilizes the 3 P's of the UNCRC by promoting Participation (Freedom of religion),Protection (Social Services) and Provision (Education)
2.2 Protection
2.2.1 Your parents have a responsibility for raising you and the State will support them in this
2.3 Participation
2.3.1 You have the right to a name at birth and the right to acquire a nationality. As far as possible the right to know your parents and be cared for by them
3 Rights frameworks and legislation can focus on different aspects of diversity. Practitioners need knowledge of legislation (and, as employees, they are covered by much of this legislation). Additionally, having this knowledge and skills to signpost parents and young people to useful sources of support is empowering to practitioners and service users alike. Another way of approaching diversity, discrimination and inequalities is through the use of rights frameworks. These can guide practice, empower service users, form the basis of legal challenges, and become a way of contrasting the lives of children, young people and families in different countries
3.1 Sexual orientation equality as an example, the commission suggests that some significant developments in society have been reflected in policy and legislation in the last ten years. Changes to employment rights, civil partnerships, changes to adoption laws, the removal of Section 28 of the Local Government Act 1988 and openly lesbian and gay politicians.
4 Practitioners also need to reflect on their own values, knowledge and practice, and those of their society and workplace, in order to ensure that they are not reinforcing existing forms of discrimination and inequality.
4.1 ‘Knights Enham Primary School’ good example of rights
4.1.1 The children in this school appear to have a working knowledge of their rights and of this rights framework. The way that respect is balanced here alongside responsibility is a fairly typical approach in many settings, and support the view that people should not have rights without taking responsibility. It’s interesting to see in this example that children take the idea of rights into other areas of their lives.

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